UW Bothell Learning Technologies Blog Rotating Header Image

tips

6 Dimensions of Effective Online Video Presentation

Article Source: Campus Technology at https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/12/07/6-dimensions-for-more-effective-online-instructional-videos.aspx#

 

presentations

Image Source: http://samn.co/tips-for-giving-your-first-demo/

Understanding how to make a good online video presentations can sometimes be daunting and even the best effort can sometimes fall short. To streamline this process, here are 6 quick tips to help you create better video presentations online from an article from CampusTechnology.com

1. Sound – The first thing you need for a successful online video presentation is a good script. Cut down on confusing words or sentences and stay away from words like “um” or “so”. The first take won’t always be perfect so try multiple recordings until you sound confident and professional.

2. Visuals – Videos that constantly zoom in and out can sometimes detract from the viewer’s experience especially when you’re trying to explain a concept. The best way to work around this issue is to put the concept on a full page while you start talking about it in your video.

3. Applications – Applications are a little more difficult due to the fact that you can’t teach someone everything they need to know about the program in one video. There are two approaches to teaching someone about a program. The first approach is to give a general overview of the program. The second approach is to go in depth on specific features without trying to teach them all at once.

4. Framing – The general outline of the video, also known as “framing”, consists of three steps:

  •  Tell them what you’re going to tell them
  • Tell them
  • Tell them what you told them

Viewers aren’t looking for a structured lecture like they would get at school. All they really want is the information as fast as they can get it so the more straightforward you make your video presentation, the better.

5. Personality – There’s a fine balance between appearing too introverted, and appearing too extroverted in your video. As the instructor, you need to find this middle ground that shows your passion for the subject, but allows you to recite the information in a professional manner. When searching for the sweet spot, take into account your who your audience is and the subject matter you are teaching.

6. Balance – The final dimension of video presentation is balance. Will the video you created meet the criteria for what you want to teach and is the material serious enough to be taught in the first place?

Creating an online presentation video can be difficult but if you follow these 6 dimensions, you will find yourself creating a great educational video. Just remember to balance each dimension in order to find the sweet spot because going to far in either direction can sometimes have the opposite result.

Canvas Tips to Start the Year Off Right!

Want help with learning technologies, digital media, assignment/course design, or hybrid/online learning? Go to our LT website to book time with us or ask us a question!

Students:

Tip #1: SENDING A MESSAGE IN CANVAS

Did you know? You can send a private message to your professor or classmates through Canvas. All you need to do is click on Inbox in the top right hand corner of your Canvas window. Click on compose a new message, then select your course and the professor/classmate you want to communicate with. This tool is incredibly useful for asking your professor or classmates questions, or even talking to members in your group.

p

Tip #2: OPENING CANVAS

Did you know? You don’t always need to log in to MyUW in order to access Canvas. All you need to do is type in canvas.uw.edu and you will automatically be taken to the login page for Canvas. No need to navigate through your MyUW page to find the Canvas link.

o

Tip #3:  COURSES AND GROUPS CUSTOMIZATION

Did you know?  You can change what courses and groups appear under the Courses and Groups tab on your Canvas Homepage. All you need to do is hover over the Courses and Groups tab, then click on View all or Customize

op

in the top right hand corner. From there you can star which courses you want to appear on the dropdown menu. This can save you the time of searching for your course every time you need to access it.

Tip #4: COURSE ACCESS

Did you know? You will always have access on Canvas to the courses you have taken, long after the course is completed. You can look at assignments you turned in, grades you received, files and readings you were assigned, and much more! You can use previous courses as a resource for courses you will take in the future.

k

Faculty:

Tip #1: REGISTRATION ISSUE IN CANVAS 

There is a known issue in the Canvas system that sometimes causes a discrepancy between students who are enrolled through MyUW and those who show up as enrolled in your Canvas course. To resolve this issue, send an email to HELP@UW.EDU with the course title and quarter and request that they update your Canvas course enrollments.

Tip #2: PUBLISH YOUR CANVAS COURSE

pub

Remember that you can build your course in Canvas before the quarter without the students seeing all of the changes. Once you are prepared for students to interact with your Canvas course site, you must make sure to publish it. To do so, follow these steps:

  1. Go to your Canvas course and click Home
  2. At the top of the page under the heading THIS COURSE IS UNPUBLISHED click the link published.
  3. Finally, click the Publish Course button that shows up near the bottom of the page.

Tip #3: REMOVE UNNEEDED NAVIGATION ITEMS

To reduce confusion for your students, we recommend that you remove links in the course navigation that you are not using. For example, you might remove the Outcomes, Conferences, and Collaborations links in the navigation, if those tools are not being used in your course. Here’s how to do this:

  1. Click Settings in your course navigation
  2. Click the Navigation tab in Settings, near the top of the page
  3. Now drag and drop items that are not needed below the line that reads Drag items here to hide them from students.
  4. Click Save at the bottom of the page.

set

Note: removing the links means that students will not see them. However, as an instructor, you will still see the grayed out links, and you are still able to access them.

Tip #4: CANVAS DRAFT STATE – PUBLISH EVERYTHING

Recently, UW implemented the Canvas Draft State feature. Draft State allows content in Assignments, Quizzes, Discussions, Pages, and Modules to exist in an unpublished (draft) state. By default, any newly created content remains in an unpublished (draft state) that is not visible to students until you publish them. For more details on Draft State for the individual content areas, view the Canvas Lessons:

pan

For more Canvas tutorials – check out the Learning Tech Canvas website!

Five Key Tips to being a Successful Online Student

Introducing IMD at UWB 061413-2Students enrolled in online courses often find it difficult to balance their academic, social, and occupational lives. As such, we at UWB LT have created this list of five key tips on how to be a successful digital learner.

You may find that these steps are also useful for being a successful traditional student, but they are especially critical for online students to succeed. (more…)

iPad + Dropbox + Airsketch = Cheap & Easy Interactive Whiteboard

Have you ever wanted to annotate pictures, slideshow presentations, class readings, or any other files during a lecture? For example, say you’re examining a work of art that is full of visual symbolism. When discussing this art work, it would be helpful to highlight the symbolic objects in the painting for the whole class to see, right? Now, using only an iPad, ePodium, and two apps…you can very easily do this!

The video below shows the process of turning your iPad and projector into an interactive whiteboard. Before you get started following the tutorial, you will need to download two apps to your iPad: Dropbox and Airsketch. Note that you will need to create a Dropbox account. You will also need to convert the file you wish to annotate to PDF format and upload the file to Dropbox. Here are links to tutorials from the Learning Technologies website that will guide you through this process:

Full transcript available here via Google Docs