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Tableau Desktop Review

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As part of UW Bothell’s mission to establish digital literacy in its students and faculty, bridging digital media tools with other areas of study is an important educational strategy that greatly enhances the value and skillset of students and instructors, as well as prepares individuals for a society where digital media tools and practices exist as the standard and norm. In an article written by Andreas Brockhaus, UW Bothell’s Director of Learning Technologies, he states that the importance of acquiring digital literacy skills is even higher now, as digital media becomes pertinent in all forms of professional and institutional work. “For faculty and especially for students, the explosion of digital media tools and practices in society have made it ever more vital that students gain skills in using media across many disciplines.” (Brockhaus, 34)

 

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Tableau Desktop, one of four main products under the Tableau Software name: Tableau Desktop, Tableau Server, Tableau Reader and Tableau Public, is one of the leading digital literacy tools in data visualization for statistical and data analysis. With a simple interface and powerful set of features and tools, Tableau Desktop has made analyzing data easier and much more intuitive.

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Introducing the Learning Technologies Video Tutorial Library

Here at UW Bothell Learning Technologies, we’ve produced dozens of video tutorials to help UW students, faculty and staff find their way around technologies like Canvas, UW Google Apps, Tegrity and more. Previously, all of the videos could only be found on the site among the written tutorial pages. In an effort to make our video selection more centralized and easier to browse, we’re introducing the Learning Technologies Video Tutorial Library!

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The library–which will also be continuously updated as new content is published–features links to all Learning Technologies videos as well as the tutorial pages where they are embedded (provided the pages still exist). The videos are organized by the tool they are associated with, which you can quickly navigate from the shortcut links at the top of the page.

We hope that this will make the videos on our site easier to find and more convenient to anyone looking for help or interested in learning something new!

Media & Communication Students’ Projects are Great Examples of Blogs/Sites in Education

Last quarter, I completed BISMCS 333: Media and Communication Studies, the core class for the UWB Media & Communication studies major. Taught by Amoshaun Toft, the class covered many different aspects of communications, media, and policy, all while putting them in a 21st-century context. As part of our final project, each group created a communication object to share with the rest of the class, also to be showcased to the public in a way of our choosing. Initially, groups were assigned to research and discuss topics of gender, race or class within the media. The research turned to analysis, which then turned into the object, presentation and reflection. Communication objects groups chose to create included Twitter accounts, memes, informational/satirical posters, and web sites–which I’d like to take a moment to discuss.

All of the student work was creative, impressive and fantastically put together. Although, working in Learning Technologies made me automatically pay close attention to the sites some groups created using WordPress and Wix. Usually whenever these sites appear in the classroom, they are being used as the course website (a great example of this is Professor Toft’s site for that class). Using these sites and others like it for student projects is a bit less common. However, all of these groups pulled it off and created some great sites. If you are wondering how to use blog hosting sites in your classroom, or if you just want to be inspired by awesome student work, read on:

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iPad + Dropbox + Airsketch = Cheap & Easy Interactive Whiteboard

Have you ever wanted to annotate pictures, slideshow presentations, class readings, or any other files during a lecture? For example, say you’re examining a work of art that is full of visual symbolism. When discussing this art work, it would be helpful to highlight the symbolic objects in the painting for the whole class to see, right? Now, using only an iPad, ePodium, and two apps…you can very easily do this!

The video below shows the process of turning your iPad and projector into an interactive whiteboard. Before you get started following the tutorial, you will need to download two apps to your iPad: Dropbox and Airsketch. Note that you will need to create a Dropbox account. You will also need to convert the file you wish to annotate to PDF format and upload the file to Dropbox. Here are links to tutorials from the Learning Technologies website that will guide you through this process:

Full transcript available here via Google Docs

Student videos from UWB’s Computing Technology & Public Policy classes

As part of the CSS411/BIS421 Computing Technology & Public Policy class at UW Bothell, students created informational videos on the use of computers and technology today and their impact on everyday life. These videos span a range of topics from privacy issues on the Internet to piracy to e-waste and cybercrime.

You can view these videos on the class YouTube page at http://www.youtube.com/user/css411uwb.