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6 Dimensions of Effective Online Video Presentation

Article Source: Campus Technology at https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/12/07/6-dimensions-for-more-effective-online-instructional-videos.aspx#

 

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Image Source: http://samn.co/tips-for-giving-your-first-demo/

Understanding how to make a good online video presentations can sometimes be daunting and even the best effort can sometimes fall short. To streamline this process, here are 6 quick tips to help you create better video presentations online from an article from CampusTechnology.com

1. Sound – The first thing you need for a successful online video presentation is a good script. Cut down on confusing words or sentences and stay away from words like “um” or “so”. The first take won’t always be perfect so try multiple recordings until you sound confident and professional.

2. Visuals – Videos that constantly zoom in and out can sometimes detract from the viewer’s experience especially when you’re trying to explain a concept. The best way to work around this issue is to put the concept on a full page while you start talking about it in your video.

3. Applications – Applications are a little more difficult due to the fact that you can’t teach someone everything they need to know about the program in one video. There are two approaches to teaching someone about a program. The first approach is to give a general overview of the program. The second approach is to go in depth on specific features without trying to teach them all at once.

4. Framing – The general outline of the video, also known as “framing”, consists of three steps:

  •  Tell them what you’re going to tell them
  • Tell them
  • Tell them what you told them

Viewers aren’t looking for a structured lecture like they would get at school. All they really want is the information as fast as they can get it so the more straightforward you make your video presentation, the better.

5. Personality – There’s a fine balance between appearing too introverted, and appearing too extroverted in your video. As the instructor, you need to find this middle ground that shows your passion for the subject, but allows you to recite the information in a professional manner. When searching for the sweet spot, take into account your who your audience is and the subject matter you are teaching.

6. Balance – The final dimension of video presentation is balance. Will the video you created meet the criteria for what you want to teach and is the material serious enough to be taught in the first place?

Creating an online presentation video can be difficult but if you follow these 6 dimensions, you will find yourself creating a great educational video. Just remember to balance each dimension in order to find the sweet spot because going to far in either direction can sometimes have the opposite result.

Video Observation is helping Professors Grade Themselves

Video observation is not a new concept on a college campus; though typically, it’s used for athletes, rather than professors. But this could be changing, according to a study done at Harvard University that suggests that this same tactic could benefit educators. In an article by Erin McIntyre, in Harvard’s two-year study, video observation was found to improve a teacher’s evaluation in several ways. Additionally, video-recorded performances were found to be more productive rather than on an in-person review. Feedback was more specific and educators got the chance to watch themselves interact with students. While Harvard’s studies focused only on the educators of K-12, there are several colleges and universities that already offer video observations to their faculty in order to improve their teaching.

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At the University of Michigan, the Center for Research on Learning and Teaching (CRLT) encourages faculty members to obtain feedback in several ways.  These include student questionnaires, self-reflection and peer observation, as well as video observation and confidential reviews with its staff to faculty throughout the university.

At Harvard, through their Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning, any educator can request a video recording that they can then review it with a trained consultant.

At the University of Colorado at Boulder, they consider video observations so important that students are required to do two in order to complete the Graduate Teacher Program. Students use the videos as a basis for a self-assessment and an improvement plan.

As research continues to strongly support the value observations, a video camera in the classroom may be just as common as a camera on the football field.

For more information, please visit the article here

Digital Media Lab: A Media Oasis

Students in Digital Media LabHave you had a chance to check out UW2-121? It is the University of Washington Bothell’s Digital Media Lab!

Inside you will find twenty-four high-end audio, photo and video production machines. The Digital Media Lab, or DML for short, is an open computer lab, a tutoring space and a digital media classroom.

We offer in-class workshops for a number of different software titles such as Adobe Photoshop, Final Cut Pro 7 and Audacity. Students can come in during our open lab hours to receive one-on-one help with pre and post production filmmaking techniques, Google Sites and an ever growing list of media production related software titles. Finally, the DML is a cool place to hang out and have fun!

Check out the DML website for more information at http://www.uwb.edu/learningtech/dml121.

Wait there’s more! UWB’s Digital Media Lab is expanding! We have received four new computers, located in the Open Computer Lab UW2-140, for audio, photo and video production.  Also, a new 6400dpi color scanner will be installed in the DML towards the end of the winter quarter.

UW Bothell Faculty Members Experiment with Tegrity

UPDATE (2/13/2012): Dr. Kim Williams-Guillén reports that her class attendance remains at 90 percent, even with the availability of the recordings.

“Even though I have all the lectures posted on Tegrity I have been averaging above 90% attendance rate for the quarter, so it’s not like all the students abandoned ship once the lectures went online!  Partly that is because we actually do a lot of activities and group work in class that Tegrity is (not yet, at least) able to capture,Williams-Guillén wrote.

Since the Tegrity lecture capture system arrived on campus Winter quarter, Dr. Carol Leppa, Interim Director and Professor of Nursing, Dr. Kim Williams-Guillén, Acting Assistant Professor in Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, and Dr. Robert Turner, Assistant Professor of Interdisciplinary Arts and Science, have all made forays into using the technology and all report positive results.

Tegrity is lecture capture software that allows instructors to capture video of themselves, audio of their voice and computer screen activity, such as Web browsing or PowerPoint presentation slides. Lectures (construe this term broadly) can be captured as they take place in front of a room of students or privately in one’s office as a way to create a video lecture for students to view outside of class.*

[Note: if you are interested in learning more about Tegrity as an instructional tool, contact Learning Technologies at learningtech@uwb.edu.]

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Student videos from UWB’s Computing Technology & Public Policy classes

As part of the CSS411/BIS421 Computing Technology & Public Policy class at UW Bothell, students created informational videos on the use of computers and technology today and their impact on everyday life. These videos span a range of topics from privacy issues on the Internet to piracy to e-waste and cybercrime.

You can view these videos on the class YouTube page at http://www.youtube.com/user/css411uwb.