Meet the Staff

Christopher Sanford | Claire Fung | Frederica Overstreet |
Christopher Behrens | John Lynch | Christopher Spitters | Anna McDonald


Christopher Sanford, MD, MPH, DTM&H

Dr. Christopher Sanford is a family medicine physician who has practiced at the University of Washington since 2000; he joined UW’s Family Medicine Residency in 2009. In addition to being the Director of the Global Health Fellowship, he is Director of the Travel Clinic at the UW Neighborhood Northgate Clinic, which offers a full spectrum of pre- and post-travel services. He serves as Coordinator of the seven travel clinics within the University of Washington. Together with two other UW physicians, Drs. David Roesel and Paul Pottinger, Dr. Sanford was awarded a three-year grant from UW’s Dept. of Global Health to establish a tropical medicine training program for physicians in East Africa. Now hosted by a consortium of five institutions (UW, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Makerere University [Uganda], and Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Center [Tanzania]), this three-month course is held annually, and enrolls 60 African and Global North physicians. He is Chair of a biennial CME course, Update, Travel Medicine & Global Health. During this two-and-a-half day conference, experts speak on a variety of topics within travel and tropical medicine, and global health, including public health in low-resource settings.

His overseas work has included work at clinics and hospitals in the Peruvian Amazon and Ethiopia. His research interests include threats to health in cities in the Global South, disaster medicine, public health, and medical education in low- resource settings.

He is Acting Deputy Director on his US federal disaster response team, IMSuRT-West. His deployments with that team have included deployments to New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina, Port-au-Prince following the 2010 earthquake, and the wildfires in San Diego, California, in 2007.

He is on the University of Washington’s Faculty Senate (2012-2014) and Information Technology Advisory Committee.

He serves on the Examinations Committee for the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.
He published two books in 2008: The Travel and Tropical Medicine Manual, 4th Edition, Elsevier, which he edited with Dr. Elaine Jong, and The Adventurous Traveler’s Guide to Health, University of Washington Press. He has also published over a dozen chapters for texts and several papers on topics within tropical medicine, infectious disease, disaster medicine, and travel medicine.

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Claire Fung, MD, MPH

Claire Fung completed her residency training in Family Medicine at the University of Washington. She then served as the Chief Resident in the Residency and acted as Program Coordinator for the Global Health Fellowship in its first year.

Dr. Fung completed her undergraduate studies at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, majoring in Cell Biology and minoring in Psychology/Child Development.  She then went on to receive her MD/MPH at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana with a concentration in International Health and Development.

Her passion for working with underserved populations stems from her experience traveling around the world for medical outreach and pleasure, and from living and working in post-Katrina New Orleans.  During medical school, she travelled to Peru to explore ongoing intiatives in Public Health and also to Lesotho to volunteer with the Touching Tiny Lives Foundation.

Dr. Fung's professional interests outside of Global Health and Travel Medicine include Medical Education, and Preventive Medicine (childhood obesity prevention).  She also speaks four languages: English, French, Spanish and Cantonese.  When not at work, you will find her spending time with her family, making music, cooking up something delicious, or producing artwork with her camera or paintbrush!

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Frederica Overstreet, MD, MPH.

Frederica Overstreet, MD, MPH is a native of Seattle, Washington. She has a B.A. from Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland (1986) where her training in molecular biology landed her work in the emerging field of biotechnology. A competing interest in anthropology took her to the Andes then to West Africa as a Peace Corps volunteer where she was introduced to maternal and child health. She pursued this field further, obtaining a master’s degree in public health from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor specializing in international health (1992). She enjoyed brief stints as a global health consultant at PATH (Program for Appropriate Technologies in Health) headquarters in Seattle before entering the University of Washington School of Medicine earning an M.D. in 1996. She completed her residency in family medicine at Providence Seattle Medical Center (currently Swedish Cherry Hill) in 2000. From 2000 to 2008 she was a staff physician at Providence and Swedish Hospitals and had her practice at the Carolyn Downs Family Medical Center satellite of the Country Doctor Community Health Centers in Seattle. She joined the University of Washington Department of Family Medicine in 2009, and has her clinical practice at Harborview Family Medical Clinic. She teaches family medicine residents and medical students; and has an interest in issues affecting the health of vulnerable populations around the world. She works on projects and with agencies providing for the diverse and underserved neighborhoods of South East Seattle.

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Christopher Behrens, MD

Dr. Behrens is the Medical Director of the International Training and Education Center on Health (I-TECH) and a Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine with joint appointments in the Departments of Global Health and Medicine/Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Washington. He has been providing HIV- and TB-focused technical assistance to multiple countries in Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, South America and the Caribbean region.
Dr. Behrens obtained a BA in Political Science at Stanford University and his medical degree from the University of California – San Francisco. He is board certified in Family Medicine.

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John Lynch, MD, MPH

John Lynch, MD, MPH is the medical director of the Infectious Diseases Clinic at Harborview Medical Center, which provides care for patients for all types of infectious diseases. As part of his practice, he also provides travel medicine consultations to the patients and staff of Harborview and the UW. Dr. Lynch's areas of interest outside of clinical care are focused on prevention of healthcare associated infections in patients, antimicrobial resistant bacteria and the health of healthcare workers.

Born in Rhode Island, Dr. Lynch received his B.A. in anthropology and history from the University of Washington, followed by several years of clinical experiences and research before attending the UW School of Medicine. He did his residency in internal medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital before returning to Seattle for a fellowship in infectious diseases and a post-doctoral fellowship at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in the laboratory of Dr. Julie Overbaugh. He joined the faculty a the UW in 2009 and is now an Assistant Professor in the Division of Allergy/Infectious Diseases. Sites of work internationally include Gyumbri, Armenia, Nairobi, Kenya, and Lagos, Nigeria.

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Christopher Spitters, MD/MPH/MA

Dr. Spitters is the medical director of the King County Tuberculosis Clinic at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle.  He also serves as TB control officer in Snohomish and Island Counties and health officer in Yakima and Klickitat Counties and is a medical consultant to the National Tuberculosis Program in Suriname.  He is certified by the American Board of Preventive Medicine and is an Associate Clinical Professor of both Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology at the University of Washington (UW) Schools of Medicine and Public Health, respectively.  Dr. Spitters also is a TB lecturer and medical consultant for Curry International Tuberculosis Center at UC San Francisco.

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Anna McDonald

Having spent the majority of my life rooted in the southern culture of North Carolina, I moved to Seattle to see what life would be like on the “best coast”. I completed my undergrad at Duke University, then spent the next year living and working in various public health and clinical settings in Guatemala, Peru, and Tanzania – an experience that confirmed my desire to spend my life working towards providing basic healthcare services to the world’s most vulnerable populations. To that end, I began my medical education at the University of North Carolina, taking an extra year to complete my MPH at Harvard University, with a concentration in Global Health. When it came time to choose a residency program, I was drawn to the Swedish Family Medicine program and the Downtown Family Medicine Clinic because of the ubiquitous commitment to working with underserved populations, the wealth of international experience, and the passion and commitment to leading political and social change I found in the faculty and my co-residents there. Completing residency in a health department-based training system allowed me to learn from and care for some of Seattle’s most vulnerable populations, and furthered my commitment to this type of work. I became involved with Seattle’s Ethiopian community and helped to lead a series of health education sessions at the monthly community meetings, and eventually got to spend a month in Gondar, Ethiopia, working towards the development of a new Family Medicine curriculum there. I am excited to continue to pursue my wide array of interests within family medicine - global health policy, maternal and child health, and advocating for social justice/eliminating health disparities – during my fellowship year at UW.

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