Friday Harbor Laboratories
last modified March 16, 2017

Autumn 2017 Courses


Student Quotes

  • "It was the best part of my undergraduate education for so many reasons. It improved my critical thinking and my understanding of biology and physiology which helps me in my career in medicine now. FHL is an invaluable place!!"
  • "Coming from Norway, doing courses at FHL gave me the opportunity to make contact with students and researchers from the US, which have been very valuable to me. In addition, the knowledge I gained during my stay in FHL is valuable to my career, because I could not get similar courses in my country."
  • "Because of FHL, I'm applying to doctoral programs in ecology and evolutionary biology, despite having studied physics as an undergraduate. FHL enabled me to do this by providing research opportunities, excellent courses, and an open, inviting atmosphere."
  • "… I got an important taste of laboratory and fieldwork that I never would have gotten through normal courses at the UW. I learned a lot about evolution and development, a topic I am becoming more and more interested in. It was also a good chance to meet and interact with people studying evolution at other universities -- people I still see at conferences every now and then."

APPLY BY:

MAY 15, 2017 - early admission review date
JULY 1, 2017 - standard application due date*


*Students are encouraged to apply as early as possible. Applications will be accepted after July 1 if space is available. For information please contact Stacy Markman, FHL Student Coordinator.

FHL AUTUMN QUARTER:

Wednesday, September 27 to Friday, December 8, 2017 (10.5 weeks), classes held Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Classes start Wed., Sept. 27 at 8:30 a.m. and end Friday, Dec. 8 at 5:00 p.m.

Students should arrive at FHL on Tuesday, Sept. 26 anytime after 3:00 p.m. (the first dinner at FHL is served at 6:00 p.m. but is not required) and depart no later than Saturday, Dec. 9 after breakfast which is served 7:45-8:15 a.m. (Students may depart anytime after 5:00 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 8 or may choose to stay overnight at FHL on Friday, Dec. 8 departing Saturday morning, Dec. 9.)


Thanksgiving Holiday 2017:

No classes will be held on Thursday, November 23 or Friday, November 24 for the Thanksgiving holiday weekend. Students may choose to stay on campus during this holiday. The FHL Dining Hall will be closed after lunch on Wednesday (hot lunches will be served on Wednesday, but no dinner), through Sunday morning, reopening for dinner on Sunday at 5:00 p.m. Students staying on campus will be given access to cooking facilities for these four days, if requested.


• Credits for FHL coursework will be earned through the University of Washington but applicants to FHL courses do not need to be enrolled at UW to apply. Students from all over the world come to study and conduct research at Friday Harbor Labs.

• UW students with dorm contracts in Seattle should cancel their application and dorm assignment in Seattle within one week of confirming their attendance at Friday Harbor Labs. Log into the UW Housing & Food Services Application and Assignment Home Page and submit an Agreement Termination Notice (located under the Resident Resources header for the relevant academic year). On the HFS form, to answer the question "Where are you moving to?" please select the choice "off-campus house/apartment."

How do students register for courses at Friday Harbor Labs?
Students must apply and be accepted by Friday Harbor Labs before they can be registered for FHL courses or research apprenticeships. There are different registration procedures for spring, summer and autumn quarters at FHL, and for University of Washington (UW) students and non-UW students.

• Marine Biology Quarter (MBQ) Course Registration: FHL staff will provide Add Codes to UW-matriculated students so that students can register themselves for MBQ courses at FHL. All non-UW students will be registered with the assistance of FHL staff.

• Research Apprenticeship Course Registration: All research apprenticeship students will be registered by FHL staff; UW students do not register themselves directly for research apprenticeships.

Apply

Estimated Costs 2017

Student Information

Research Apprenticeship Program

Summer 2017

Spring 2017



AUTUMN QUARTER 2017 COURSE LIST


1) MARINE BIOLOGY QUARTER

Students select a combination of courses to total full-time enrollment (12 or more credits); course choices and course descriptions are listed below.

2) PELAGIC ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION IN THE SAN JUAN ARCHIPELAGO
RESEARCH APPRENTICESHIP

(Ocean 492 A, 15 credits)



Marine Biology Quarter (MBQ)
Autumn 2017

MAY 15, 2017 - early application due date
JULY 1, 2017 - standard application due date*


*Students are encouraged to apply as early as possible. Applications will be accepted after July 1 if space is available. For information, please contact Stacy Markman, FHL Student Coordinator.

To apply, students should: (a) follow the application procedures and (b) email their preferred course choices to Stacy Markman. Nine course options are listed below; students select a combination of courses (usually 3, 4 or 5 courses) to total 12 or more credits, full-time enrollment. Course descriptions are available further down the page.

1. Marine Biology (FISH/OCEAN/BIOL 250, 5 credits)*
2. Integrative Oceans (OCEAN 210, 4 credits)
3. Biology of Fishes (FHL 305, 5 credits)
4. Comparative Animal Physiology (BIOL 467, 3 credits)*
5. Research in Marine Biology (FHL 470, 6 credits)*
6. Science Writing (FHL 333, 3 or 5 credits / ENGL 381, 5 credits)
7. Reading and Writing the Marine Environment (ENGL 365, 5 credits)
8. Creative Writing Lab (ENGL 383, 5 credits / ENGL 493, variable credits 1-5)
9. Marine Sciences Seminar (FHL 490, 1 credit)

*Note: Due to scheduling issues, it will not be possible to take the following courses together:
- Marine Biology
and Comparative Animal Physiology
- Marine Biology
and Research in Marine Biology


AUTUMN QUARTER 2017:
Wednesday, September 27 to Friday, December 8, 2017 (10.5 weeks).


Students should arrive at FHL on Tuesday, Sept. 26 anytime after 3:00 p.m. (the first dinner at FHL is served at 6:00 p.m. but attendance is not required) and depart no later than Saturday, Dec. 9 after breakfast which is served 7:45-8:15 a.m. (Students may depart anytime after 5:00 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 8 or may choose to stay overnight at FHL on Friday, Dec. 8, departing Saturday morning, Dec. 9.)

MARINE BIOLOGY QUARTER
AUTUMN 2017
WEEKLY CLASS SCHEDULE - TO BE DETERMINED

 
MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
8:30-9:30 a.m.
9:30-10:30 a.m.
10:30-Noon
Noon-1:00 p.m.
LUNCH
12:15-12:45
LUNCH
12:15-12:45
LUNCH
12:15-12:45
LUNCH
12:15-12:45
LUNCH
12:15-12:45
1:00-5:00 p.m.

 

5:00-7:30 p.m.

DINNER
6:00-6:30

DINNER
6:00-6:30
DINNER
6:00-6:30
DINNER
6:00-6:30
DINNER
6:00-6:30
7:30-8:30 p.m.

*On the first day of the term, Wednesday, Sept. 27, students will spend part of the day attending an introductory session plus a tour of the FHL facilities.


Marine Biology Quarter course descriptions:

1) Marine Biology
FISH/OCEAN/BIOL 250
, 5 credits

Alexander (Zander) Fodor
University of Washington
zebinini@gmail.com

Christopher Wells
University of Washington
christopher.wells.23@gmail.com


This 5-credit lecture/laboratory course focuses on the incredible diversity of organisms inhabiting the marine environment. During the quarter we will take a broad tour through the plants and animals of the marine realm (plankton, seaweeds, invertebrates, fish, birds, and mammals), exploring how these organisms have adapted to life under water. Numerous field and laboratory exercises will expose students to common marine biological techniques and to the diverse marine communities common to Washington’s San Juan Islands. (Note: this course fulfills a core requirement of the Marine Biology minor for UW students.) Recommended: at least one quarter of introductory biology (more is preferable).
Enrollment limited to 30 students.

 

2) Integrative Oceans
OCEAN 210, 4 credits

Dr. Adam Summers
University of Washington
fishguy@uw.edu

The objectives of this course are to learn the patterns of, and processes that cause, the large scale circulation of currents in the surface ocean and deep sea. The ocean's circulation plays a very important role in controlling the earth's climate. We will learn how to use observations (data) to answer oceanographic questions quantitatively in addition to qualitatively (problem solving skills). Our focus is on the large-scale circulation of the ocean. Topics include temperature-salinity analysis; water mass identification; water, salt, and heat budgets; chemical tracer distributions; advection and diffusion.

Textbook to be determined.

Photo: Dr. Tom Mumford



3) Biology of Fishes

FHL 305, 5 credits (W credits)

Dr. Matthew Kolmann
University of Washington
kolmann@uw.edu

FHL 305, Biology of Fishes, is an introductory course designed to provide an overview on the diversity of fishes, namely on their ecology and evolutionary relationships. We'll discuss and conduct hands-on examinations of the anatomy, systematics, behavior, and trends in diversity of extinct and extant fishes — from jawless fishes like hagfish and lampreys, to jawed animals like cartilaginous sharks and rays, and on to the most diverse group of fishes: the bony fishes and teleosts. This survey will impart students with the basic rules governing where we find certain fishes, from the freshwaters of Amazonia onto mangrove swamps and coral reefs in the Indo-Pacific, and focusing especially on the fishes of the Salish Sea in lab. Students will leave with an understanding of the history of fishes, the basics of their identification and relationships, and a global perspective on modern fish diversity and biogeography.


4) Comparative Animal Physiology
BIOL 467, 3 credits

Dr. Adam Summers
University of Washington
fishguy@uw.edu

Students in this course will study organismal function in an evolutionary context. Uses a variety of animals to highlight transitions in metabolism, muscle function, respiration, circulation, digestion, excretion, and ion regulation.


5) Research in Marine Biology
FHL 470, 6 credits (W credits)
Faculty to be determined

This course provides students with a hands-on introduction of "doing science." The bulk of the course will be spent engaged in research activities in close collaboration with a supervisor. Students' projects will focus on selected questions of marine biology; research topics vary, but will involve lab experiments and/or field work in the local marine habitats of the San Juan Archipelago. We will also engage in lectures and class activities to gain skills in gathering, analyzing, and presenting data, as well as ethical dilemmas in the sciences (the nuts and bolts of collaboration, authorship, grant-writing, and professional conduct). Mary Gates funding may be available for UW-matriculated undergraduates.* Enrollment limited to 20 students.

 


6) Science Writing
FHL 333, 3 or 5 credits
or ENGL 381, 5 credits
'W' Writing credit is available by request. Interested UW students should speak with the instructor on the first class day of the program.

Dr. Adam Summers
University of Washington
fishguy@uw.edu


Richard Kenney
University of Washington
rlkenney@gmail.com

There is no greater impediment to communication of scientific ideas than writing style. Lack of style, or style with a poor foundation for this type of communication, leads to ideas poorly expressed, alienated readers, and frustrated authors. The classic style of writing is a framework for the clear and direct communication of information. You will learn the elements of this style, and will apply your understanding to communicating scientific ideas. The textbook for the course is Thomas and Turner's Clear and Simple as the Truth.


7) Reading and Writing the Marine Environment

ENGL 365 (5 credits)
'W' Writing credit is available for ENGL 365 by request. Interested UW students should speak with the instructor on the first class day of the program.

Richard Kenney
University of Washington
rlkenney@gmail.com

Inspired by writers, artists, scientists and naturalists who have taken the sea for their subject, this is a marine-minded literature and writing course intended for readers and writers from all disciplinary backgrounds, engaging both creative and critical processes.

Q: What book is an unparalleled extravagance of literary ambition and style, a firsthand observatory of sea and life at sea, a serious natural history of cetacean mammals, an apparently bottomless mirror for American philosophical self-reflection, at once a mythic quest and a white-knuckle adventure story?

A: Moby Dick, our principal quarry. Chasing the White Whale, we’ll net other specimens from the literatures of the sea, contemporary and ancient, verse and prose. In all cases, this will be reading from a writerly perspective, considering the technical aspects of literary art, asking in a practical way how this work is done.

Q: Or, in a broader sense, how does a mind move from sea to seascape—from Nature to its representation—in any medium? Consider “the marine environment” in paint, verse, field note, and mathematics: do representations in each of these modes have anything in common? What are their various intents and purposes? How does nerve by language nudge the world and come away with an impression?

A: That’s the class. Our conversation will draw courage from large questions like these and others we may wish to bring to the table. Meanwhile, our principal considerations will be practical: reading for joy, conversing together, and testing our thoughts in an experimental spirit at the point of a pencil.

All welcome: no previous experience in creative writing or literary study is presumed.

UW students earn “VLPA” credits in this course. No textbook is required for this course.

8) Creative Writing Lab
ENGL 383, 5 credits,
or ENGL 493, 1-5 variable credits
'W' Writing credit is available by request. Interested UW students should speak with the instructor on the first class day of the program.

Richard Kenney
University of Washington
rlkenney@gmail.com


Integrated with the literature class (ENGL 365) this hands-on course further engages students through a series of generative creative writing experiments inspired by science and literature of the sea, as well as a dynamic roster of Visiting Artists and Scholars whose readings, lectures and prompts will focus our binoculars and microscopes more carefully on the language and skills of craft. Culminating in a portfolio of new creative writing and providing a more critical pressure toward revision than the parent class may permit, this course ignites new approaches to the creative process and develops conversational critical faculties in a communal setting. Previous creative writing experience is not required; curiosity and engagement is a requisite.
Link here for more course information.


9) Marine Sciences Seminar
FHL 490, 1 credit
Dr. Megan Dethier
mdethier@uw.edu

Course description: One lecture per week by a research scientist; all students are encouraged to attend. No textbook is required.


For general information about Friday Harbor Labs contact:
Stacy Markman,
FHL Student Coordinator

Student Coordinators at University of Washington

Credits for FHL coursework will be earned through UW but applicants to FHL courses do not need to be enrolled at University of Washington. Students from all over the world come to study and conduct research at Friday Harbor Labs.

UW students are encouraged to contact the Student Coordinators in their respective departments:


To apply, students should: (a) follow the application procedures, and (b) e-mail their preferred course choices to Stacy Markman.

Apply

Estimated Costs 2017

Student Information

Research Apprenticeship Program

Summer 2017

Spring 2017


• Students from UW may be eligible for funding from the Mary Gates Endowment for Students

(*$1250 for the 6-credit FHL research portion of the Marine Biology Quarter or $3000 for a 15-credit FHL research apprenticeship). Minimum eligibility guidelines are at least sophomore standing for a 6-credit apprenticeship, and at least junior standing for a 15-credit apprenticeship, a minimum 3.0 GPA and sufficient course background in introductory science courses; exceptions can be made for students with excellent recommendations and other specific information.

• Students from other universities may apply for limited financial aid from Friday Harbor Laboratories.


Pelagic Ecosystem Function in the San Juan Archipelago

Research Apprenticeship, Autumn 2017
Ocean 492 A, 15 credits

MAY 15, 2017 - early application due date
JULY 1, 2017 - standard application due date*

*Students are encouraged to apply as early as possible. Applications will be accepted past July 1 if space is available. For information, please contact Stacy Markman, FHL Student Coordinator.

 

AUTUMN QUARTER 2017: Wednesday, September 27 to Friday, December 8, 2017 (10.5 weeks), classes held Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Classes start Wed., Sept. 27 at 8:30 a.m., and end Friday, Dec. 9 at 5:00 p.m.

Students should arrive at FHL on Tuesday, Sept. 26 anytime after 3:00 p.m. (the first dinner at FHL is served at 6:00 p.m. but is not required) and depart no later than Saturday, Dec. 9 after breakfast which is served 7:45-8:15 a.m. (Students may depart anytime after 5:00 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 8 or may choose to stay overnight at FHL on Friday, Dec. 8, departing Saturday morning, Dec. 9.)

Dr. Jan Newton
University of Washington
Applied Physics Laboratory
newton@apl.washington.edu

W. Breck Tyler
University of California, Santa Cruz
Long Marine Laboratory
ospr@ucsc.edu

Dr. Matthew Baker
University of Washington
School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences
mattbakr@u.washington.edu

Now in its 14th year, this very successful apprenticeship, Pelagic Ecosystem Function (PEF), uses the natural laboratory of the waters in the San Juan Archipelago to investigate the workings of a unique pelagic (open water) ecosystem. Friday Harbor is an ideal place for pelagic ecosystem studies because here, inputs from oceanic realms and major river systems are mixed by powerful tidal currents, creating an oceanographically complex habitat that supports a diverse community of plankton, fishes, seabirds, and marine mammals.

For this apprenticeship, we will use university research vessels to examine the patterns, interactions, and links among all the components of this complex marine ecosystem, to understand how oceanographic processes shape the spatial and temporal patterns of open water biotic communities. Our goal is to gather data to document ecosystem trends and to teach you methods that you can use throughout your career. To achieve this, we help you design and implement an independent but integrated research project that is the keystone of this program.

Our apprenticeship features formal instruction, independent fieldwork, and a collaborative learning environment. For the first two weeks, the instructors provide an overview of basic concepts and field and laboratory techniques. Throughout the rest of the quarter, we work together to examine spatial and temporal variability in the fall transitional season for five pelagic ecosystem components: physical oceanography, chemical oceanography (DO, chlorophyll) phytoplankton, zooplankton, and predators (birds and mammals). You will to learn research methods for all of these but will then select one for intense focus. Working as part of a cooperative research team, you will have the opportunity to collect and analyze field and laboratory data. You will also learn to report your findings in a professional manner, verbally and in a written scientific paper.



This apprenticeship is a unique opportunity for you to spend a quarter conducting meaningful field research in a stimulating but supportive environment. Your work, building on the findings of previous apprentices, will contribute to a valuable data set that may enable us to document long-term changes in the region. You will also have the opportunity to learn from professional scientists and to work collaboratively with students from other institutions, teaching the methods you have learned and facilitating peer-to-peer learning.

Enrollment limited to 12 students. UW students earn “W” credits in this writing-intensive course. No textbook is required for this course.


Click here for information and testimonials from past PEF research apprentices


Apply

Estimated Costs 2017

Student Information

Research Apprenticeship Program

Spring 2017

Summer 2017


Research Apprenticeship Program Information


• UW students may be eligible for funding from the Mary Gates Endowment (MGE) for Students: $1250 for the 6-credit FHL research portion of the Marine Biology Quarter or $3000 for a 15-credit FHL research apprenticeship. Minimum eligibility guidelines are a minimum 3.0 GPA and sufficient course background in introductory science courses, at least sophomore standing for the 6-credit research portion of the Marine Biology Quarter and at least junior standing for a 15-credit research apprenticeship; exceptions can be made for students with excellent recommendations and other specific information.


• Students from other universities may apply for limited financial aid from Friday Harbor Laboratories.



Independent Study for UW Graduate Students

During all quarters, graduate students may register for research with the consent of their faculty advisors.

600 Independent Study or Research
700 Master's Thesis
800 Doctoral Dissertation