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Friday Harbor Laboratories

2005 Courses of Instruction
Spring, Summer and Autumn

Friday Harbor Laboratories, part of the University of Washington, offers coursework for undergraduates, post-baccalaureates and graduate students. Spring and autumn sessions run a full academic quarter (10-11 weeks) with courses and research apprenticeships targeted to undergraduates and post-baccalaureates. In summer we offer six graduate-level courses plus one undergraduate-level course. Summer courses generally run 5 weeks in one of two summer sessions (one of this summer's courses will run for 3 weeks).

Courses and research apprenticeships at Friday Harbor Laboratories (FHL) require a full-time commitment, normally all day Monday-Friday plus Saturday mornings. Students in all courses earn credits through the University of Washington.

SPRING 2005
10 weeks, March 28-June 4, Applications due January 15th

Marine Zoology/Marine Botany (Biol 430 + Biol 445)

Plus four Research Apprenticeship Teams for undergrads or post-bacs

  • The Neuroethology of Orientation Behavior: Analysis using an Invertebrate Model System (Biol 499)
  • Apprentices in Marine Fish Ecology and Marine Protected Areas (Fish 492)
  • Invertebrate Immunity and Metamorphosis (Biol 499)
  • Development and Behavioral Endocrinology of Arthropods (Biol 499)

SUMMER Term A 2005
5 weeks, June 13-July 16, Applications due March 1st

SUMMER Term B 2005
5 weeks July 18-August 20 (Marine Bioacoustics 3 weeks August 1-August 20) Applications due March 1st

AUTUMN 2005
11 weeks, September 26-December 10, Applications due July 1st

Three Research Apprenticeship Teams for undergrads or post-bacs

  • Biophysics of the Aquatic Gel Phase (Biol 499)
  • Gene Network Dynamics and Cellular Behavior (Biol 499)
  • Pelagic Ecosystem Function in the San Juan Archipelago (Ocean 499)

Beam Reach Program

Independent Study

During all quarters, graduate students may register for research at FHL with the consent of their faculty advisors: Independent Study or Research (600 level course), Master's Thesis (700 level course), Doctoral Dissertation (800 course).

Students live in dormitories on the FHL campus and are provided meals in the FHL Dining Hall. The FHL campus is sited on a 484-acre biological preserve on San Juan Island (75 miles NW of Seattle) accessible by scheduled ferry service, float plane and commuter aircraft. Accepted students should plan to arrive at FHL on the Sunday afternoon or evening the day before class begins, and may depart on the final Saturday of the session following lab clean up, normally completed by about noon.

Students may apply directly from this web site (see link provided at end of page). Admission decisions are usually made within two to four weeks following the application deadline, and applicants will be notified via email.

TRANSCRIPTS: to receive a transcript for a course or apprenticeship completed at FHL, follow instructions provided at the following University of Washington web site: http://washington.edu/students/ reg/transcripts.html#Q1.

SPRING 2005
Student applications due January 15th*

*Applications will be accepted past the due date if space available. For information contact: fhladmin@u.washington.edu.

MARINE ZOOLOGY / MARINE BOTANY

March 28 - June 4, 2005 (10 weeks) M-F 8-5; S 8-12
16 credits total:
Biology 430 (8 credits) Marine Zoology
Biology 445 (8 credits) Marine Botany

Dr. Megan Dethier and Dr. Kevin Britton-Simmons

A survey of groups of marine animals and plants represented in the San Juan Archipelago; natural history, functional morphology, ecology, distribution, habitat, adaptation, trophic interrelationships, and evolution. Considerable field work and individual research projects are included. The courses are integrated and students must register for both. Prerequisites: Appropriate background in biological sciences and permission of instructors. Enrollment limited to 20 students. For additional course information contact mdethier@u.washington.edu or aquaman@kevinbs.net

For additional information about the Marine Zoology/Marine Botany course visit http://depts.washington.edu/fhl/zoobot.html

Visit a site developed by a former "ZooBot" student (warning - pictures may take a long time to download): http://students.washington.edu/ljj/fridayharborjournal.htm

Application instructions >>

 

RESEARCH APPRENTICESHIPS
(for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates)

Research apprenticeships at FHL are offered for a full academic quarter (10-11 weeks) in both Spring and Autumn Quarters. There will be four options in Spring 2005 and three options in Autumn 2005. For 2005 research apprenticeship descriptions and information go to Undergraduate Research Apprenticeships.

 

SUMMER 2005 Session A
Student applications due March 1st*

*Applications will be accepted past due date if space available. For information contact: fhladmin@u.washington.edu.

The 5-week courses in summer (and one 3-week course) are intended primarily for graduate students, with the exception of Marine Invertebrate Zoology. Courses may be taken sequentially, i.e., one in each summer session, but not concurrently. Well-qualified undergraduates may be admitted to graduate level courses with the consent of the Director and the faculty involved.

MARINE INVERETBRATE ZOOLOGY

Session A June 13 - July 16, 2005
5 weeks: M-F 8-5; S 8-12
Biology 432 (9 credits)

Dr. Jennie Hoffman and Dr. Louise Page

This course will provide a comparative survey of marine invertebrate animals, focusing on morphology, functional biology, life history, natural history, and evolutionary relationships. Overviews of the major and some minor taxa of marine invertebrates will be given in daily lectures, but the backbone of the course consists of the study of living animals in the laboratory and in the diverse marine habitats surrounding San Juan Island. Invertebrates represent most of animal diversity. In the sea, they are important ecologically, as model systems (e.g., in neurobiology, development, ecology, evolution) and as harvested resources. The FHL invertebrate biology course is unique because its location provides easy access to an extraordinary wealth of organisms in their natural habitats.

Enrollment is limited to 20 students. For additional information contact: jhoffman@everettcc.edu

Application instructions >>

 

COMPARATIVE INVERTEBRATE EMBRYOLOGY

Session A June 13 - July 16, 2005
5 weeks: M-F 8-5; S 8-12
Biology 536 (9 credits)

Dr. George von Dassow, Dr. Julia Dallman and Dr. Richard Strathmann

This course provides extensive hands-on laboratory experience with the fertilization and development of diverse animals. Phyla represented include the Cnidaria, Ctenophora, Platyhelminthes, Nemertea, Mollusca, Annelida, Brachiopoda, Phoronida, Bryozoa, Echinodermata, Chordata, Chaetognatha, and Arthropoda. In addition to the basics of invertebrate reproduction and development, lectures will also include cellular and molecular analysis of morphogenetic processes, evolutionary changes in development, and functional consequences of different modes of development. Although the majority of lab time will be devoted to observing and drawing embryos, lecture and lab practice will also introduce various techniques for modern comparative embryologists, including confocal microscopy and imaging methods. Field collecting trips to diverse habitats will acquaint students with the environments in which reproduction and development occur and diverse sources of embryos in the San Juan Islands. The course is intended to serve both marine biologists who wish to understand diversity in modes of development for ecological and evolutionary studies and developmental biologists wishing to broaden their knowledge of embryos.

The class is at the graduate student level, but exceptionally qualified undergraduate students will be considered. Enrollment is limited to 12 students.

For additional information, contact: dassow@u.washington.edu, jdallman@notes.cc.sunysb.edu or rrstrath@u.washington.edu.

Application instructions >>

 

MARINE ALGAE

Session A June 13 - July 16, 2005
5 weeks: M-F 8-5; S 8-12
Biology 539 (9 credits)

Dr. Charles O'Kelly and Dr. Paul Gabrielson

The theme of the course is “principles, methods, and applications of marine algal biodiversity studies, in particular the macro- and microalgae of benthic environments. Students will learn a) classical and contemporary methods for the identification, classification, and phylogenetic analysis of algae, b) the theories underlying the methods, and c) the application of biodiversity information in, for example, benthic ecology, cellularevolution, and natural products exploration. Students will gain practical experience in such tools as specimen collection, preservation, and databasing; light and electron microscopy; culturing macro- and microalgae; DNA isolation and sequencing; computational approaches to phylogeny reconstruction. Field work will be extensive, as the diverse and species-rich aquatic habitats on and around San Juan Island provide ideal sites for the examination of both macroalgal and microalgal diversity. We will emphasize the use of combined approaches to answer questions. Individual and group projects will use morphological, ecological and molecular data to assess the diversity of algal populations and interpret that diversity in its ecological context. Sample questions: “How do we identify outliers of a morphologically highly variable or of an ecologically broad macroalgal species?” “What is the best way to find out what, and how many, species are present in an algal bloom?” At the end of the course, students will be able to use several of the tools now available to identify and classify algae and to critically assess the value of these tools in studies of algal biodiversity and marine benthic ecosystems. This course is appropriate for marine biologists, botanists and oceanographers with interests in marine biodiversity, conservation biology, and coastal ecology with an emphasis on primary producers. We encourage applications from graduate students and advanced undergraduates (juniors, seniors). Enrollment is limited to 12 students.

For additional information contact: cokelly@bigelow.org or drseaweed@hotmail.com

Application instructions >>

 

SUMMER 2005 - Session B
Student applications due March 1st*

*Applications will be accepted past the due date if space available. For information contact: fhladmin@u.washington.edu

The 5-week courses in summer (and one 3-week course) are intended primarily for graduate students, with the exception of Marine Invertebrate Zoology. Courses may be taken sequentially, i.e., one in each summer session, but not concurrently. Well-qualified undergraduates may be admitted to graduate level courses with the consent of the Director and the faculty involved.

PARASITES OF MARINE ORGANISMS

Session B July 18 - August 20, 2005
5 weeks: M-F 8-5; S 8-12
Fish 507 A (9 credits)

Dr. Richard Kocan

This course will acquaint students with the numerous metazoan and protozoan parasites that infect fishes and invertebrates in the San Juan Archipelago and NE Pacific. They will learn basic parasitology and to recognize and identify adult and juvenile parasites as well as their complex multispecies life cycles. The biological, economic and public health significance of each parasite group will be emphasized as well as historical changes in the parasite fauna of the Pacific NW. A permanent teaching collection of representative parasite species will be archived at FHL for future instructional and research use. Enrollment limited to 12 students.

For additional information contact: kocan@u.washington.edu

Application instructions >>

 

FISH SWIMMING: Kinematics, Ecomorphology, Behavior, and Environmental Physiology

Session B July 18 - August 20, 2005
5 weeks: M-F 8-5; S 8-12
Fish 565 A (9 credits)

Dr. Paolo Domenici (CNR-IAMC, Italy)
Dr. Guy Claireaux (Crema, La Rochelle, France)
Dr. John Steffensen (University of Copenhagen, Denmark)

Fish swimming is a multidisciplinary area of research that encompasses biomechanics, physiology, ecology and behavior. Knowledge of fish swimming is relevant both for students interested in mechanisms of locomotion, and those interested in locomotor adaptations to the environment. The main subjects will be:

  1. the kinematics and performance of swimming in fish using various locomotory modes,
  2. the ecomorphology of fish locomotion,
  3. locomotor strategies,
  4. metabolic aspects of fish swimming,
  5. the effect of various environmental factors on fish swimming.

These topics will be treated in lectures and laboratory sessions. Students will learn techniques of video analysis, respirometry, principles of telemetry. The first half of the course will have an emphasis on lectures and explanations of techniques for studying fish swimming in the laboratory and in the field. In the second half of the course, emphasis will be placed on experimental work. Students will pursue independent research projects. These will be discussed between each student and the instructors, who will also suggest a number of relevant projects. Original projects on fish locomotion, based on the student’s personal background and interest, will also be welcomed. At the end of the course, students are expected to present the results of their independent projects orally and as a written report in the format of a scientific paper. Enrollment limited to 12 students.

For additional information contact: p.domenici@imc-it.org, guy.claireaux@ifremer.fr, or JFSteffensen@zi.ku.dk.

More details can be found at: http://home.worldonline.dk/swimfish/.

Application instructions >>

 

EVOLUTION AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE METAZOANS

Session B July 18 - August 20, 2005

5 weeks: M-F 8-5; S 8-12
Biology 533 (9 credits)

Dr. Billie Swalla and Dr. Kenneth Halanych

During this course, we plan to review the current hypotheses of metazoan phylogenies and have the students learn about how to construct molecular phylogenies, using data sets pulled from the databases. Then we will learn about developmental genes and how to examine temporal and spatial expression of a gene by in situ hybridization. Finally, we hope to allow the students to complete a mini-project, where they choose a question about morphological evolution and clone a gene for phylogeny and expression studies. We do not expect this course to be concentrated only on molecular evidence. We are interested in functional morphologies of marine organisms, and we hope to stimulate students to think in terms of why certain morphologies evolve repeatedly in marine organisms due to selective constraints of the marine environment. Enrollment limited to 12 students.

For additional information contact: bjswalla@u.washington.edu or Ken@auburn.edu and visit http://faculty.washington.edu/bjswalla/ and http://www.auburn.edu/academic/science_math/biology/faculty/halanych/evodevo2003/index.html

Application instructions >>

 

MARINE BIOACOUSTICS

Session B August 1 - August 20, 2005
NOTE: 3-WEEK COURSE: M-F 8-5; S 8-12
Fish 507 B (6 credits)

Dr. Charles H. Greene, Cornell University
Dr. John Horne, University of Washington

A primary goal of this course is to provide advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral investigators with a broad understanding of the acoustic tools and techniques required to address fundamental questions pertaining to the behavior and ecology of cetaceans, fishes, and zooplankton. By bringing together many of the top research scientists in marine bioacoustics and bioacoustical oceanography, new cross-disciplinary interactions will be encouraged. Students will be exposed to the latest theories in underwater acoustics as they pertain to studying pelagic animal behavior and ecology in situ. Students also will have a unique opportunity to work side by side with active scientists using state-of-the-art tools and techniques (see Deep-Sea Research Part II, Vol. 5, No. 7, 1998). Enrollment is limited to 12 students.

For additional information contact: chg2@cornell.edu.

Chuck Greene's home page: http://www.geo.cornell.edu/geology/faculty/Greene.html.

John Horne's research web site: http://www.acoustics.washington.edu

Application instructions >>

 

AUTUMN 2005
Student applications due July 1st

RESEARCH APPRENTICESHIPS
(for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates)

There will be three research apprenticeship choices in Autumn 2005 (September 26-December 10). For research apprenticeship descriptions and information go to Undergraduate Research Apprenticeships.

 

BEAM REACH PROGRAM

August 21 - October 30, 2005 (10 weeks total, 5 weeks at FHL)

Dr. Scott Veirs, Dr. Val Veirs, and Todd Shuster

Study marine science and sustainability for 5 weeks at Friday Harbor Labs and for 5 weeks aboard a sailing catamaran. The research theme this fall is acoustic assessment of resident orcas and their environment.

For more information or to apply, visit the Beam Reach Program web site at beamreach.org.

 

Independent Study for UW Graduate Students

During all quarters, graduate students may register for research with the consent of their faculty advisors.

600 Independent Study or Research

700 Master's Thesis

800 Doctoral Dissertation

 

2004 Course archive.