Friday Harbor Laboratories

2006 Courses of Instruction
Spring, Summer and Autumn

Friday Harbor Laboratories (FHL), part of the University of Washington, offers coursework for undergraduates, post-baccalaureates and graduate students. Spring and autumn sessions run a full academic quarter (10-11 weeks) with courses and research apprenticeships targeted to undergraduates and post-baccalaureates. In summer we offer 6 graduate-level courses plus 1 undergraduate-level course. Summer courses generally run 5 weeks in one of two summer sessions. This summer FHL will also offer one 10-week research apprenticeship targeted to undergraduates and post-baccalaureates.

Courses and research apprenticeships at Friday Harbor Laboratories require a full-time commitment, normally all day Monday-Friday plus Saturday mornings. Students in all courses earn credits through the University of Washington.

SPRING QUARTER 2006

Marine Zoology/Marine Botany (Biol 430 + Biol 445)

Plus three Research Apprenticeship Teams for undergrads or post-bacs

  • Comparative Biology of Egg Maturation and Fertilization (Biol 499)
  • Marine Molecular Ecology (Biol 499)
  • Neuroethology of Orientation: Analysis using an Invertebrate Model (Biol 499)

SUMMER Session A 2006
5 weeks, June 12-July 15.

Courses listed below. Plus a Research Apprenticeship Team for undergrads or post-bacs

SUMMER Session B 2006
5 weeks July 17-August 19.

SUMMER Session A & B 2006
10 weeks, June 12-August 19

A Research Apprenticeship Team for undergrads or post-bacs: Biophysics of the Aquatic Gel Phase (Biol 499)

 

AUTUMN SEMESTER 2006
16 weeks, August 21-December 9

A Research Apprenticeship Team for undergrads or post-bacs: Ecological and Evolutionary Analysis of Spatial Variation in Marine Systems (Bio 499).

 

AUTUMN QUARTER 2006
11 weeks, September 25-December 9

Three Research Apprenticeship Teams for undergrads or post-bacs

  • Pelagic Ecosystem Function in the San Juan Archipelago (Ocean 499)
  • Marine Fish: Ecology, Habitat Requirements and the Design of MPAs (Fish 492)
  • Gene Network Dynamics and Cellular Behavior (Biol 499)

Beam Reach Program (Ocean 499)

Independent Study

During all quarters, graduate students may register for research at FHL with the consent of their faculty advisors: Independent Study or Research (600 level course), Master's Thesis (700 level course), Doctoral Dissertation (800 course).

Students live in dormitories on the FHL campus and are provided meals in the FHL Dining Hall. The FHL campus is sited on a 484-acre biological preserve on San Juan Island (75 miles NW of Seattle) accessible by scheduled ferry service, float plane and commuter aircraft. Accepted students should plan to arrive at FHL on the Sunday afternoon or evening the day before class begins, and may depart on the final Saturday of the session following lab clean up, normally completed by about noon.

Students may apply directly from this web site (see link provided at end of page). Admission decisions are usually made within four weeks following the application deadline, and applicants will be notified via email.

TRANSCRIPTS: to receive a transcript for a course or apprenticeship completed at FHL, follow instructions provided at the following University of Washington web site: http://washington.edu/students/ reg/transcripts.html#Q1.


SPRING QUARTER 2006

For information contact: fhladmin@u.washington.edu.

MARINE ZOOLOGY / MARINE BOTANY

March 27 - June 3, 2006 (10 weeks) M-F 8-5; S 8-12
16 credits total:
Biology 430 (8 credits) Marine Zoology
Biology 445 (8 credits) Marine Botany

Dr. Megan Dethier, Department of Biology, University of Washington
Dr. Emily Carrington, Department of Biology, University of Washington

A survey of groups of marine animals and plants represented in the San Juan Archipelago; natural history, functional morphology, ecology, distribution, habitat, adaptation, trophic interrelationships, and evolution. Considerable field work and individual research projects are included. The courses are integrated and students must register for both. Prerequisites: Appropriate background in biological sciences and permission of instructors. Enrollment limited to 20 students.

For additional information about the Marine Zoology/Marine Botany course visit http://depts.washington.edu/fhl/zoobot.html

Visit a site developed by a former "ZooBot" student (warning - pictures may take a long time to download): http://students.washington.edu/ljj/fridayharborjournal.htm

 

RESEARCH APPRENTICESHIPS
(for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates)

Research apprenticeships at FHL are generally offered for a full academic quarter (10-11 weeks) in Spring, Summer and Autumn Quarters. There will be three options in Spring quarter 2006. For 2006 research apprenticeship descriptions and information go to Research Apprenticeships 2006.

 

SUMMER Session A 2006

For information contact: fhladmin@u.washington.edu.

The 5-week courses in summer are intended primarily for graduate students, with the exception of Marine Invertebrate Zoology. Courses may be taken sequentially, i.e., one in each summer session, but not concurrently. Well-qualified undergraduates may be admitted to graduate level courses with the consent of the Director and the faculty involved. In 2006, FHL has also scheduled a 16-week research apprenticeship, targeted to undergraduates and post-baccalaureates.

MARINE INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY

Session A June 12 - July 15, 2006
5 weeks: M-F 8-5; S 8-12
Biology 432 (9 credits)

Dr. Mike Hart and Dr. Bruno Pernet

Comparative biology of marine invertebrate animals, focusing on morphology, functional biology, life history, and evolutionary relationships. Overviews of the major taxa and many smaller groups will be given in daily lectures, but the backbone of the course consists of the study of living animals in the laboratory and fieldwork in the diverse marine habitats surrounding San Juan Island.

Enrollment is limited to 20 students. For additional information contact: mike_hart@sfu.ca or bpernet@csulb.edu

 

COMPARATIVE INVERTEBRATE EMBRYOLOGY

Session A June 12 - July 15, 2006
5 weeks: M-F 8-5; S 8-12
Biology 536 (9 credits)

Dr. Billie J. Swalla and Dr. Sally Leys

This course will provide extensive hands-on laboratory experience with the fertilization and development of most invertebrate phyla including: Cnidaria, Ctenophora, Platyhelminthes, Nemertea, Brachiopoda, Phoronida, Bryozoa, Mollusca, Polychaeta, Chaetognatha, Echinodermata, Hemichordata and Urochordata. The lectures will focus on cellular and molecular analysis of evolutionary changes in development as well as reproduction and gametogenesis. The course will emphasize morphological processes and discuss similarities and differences in embryos. Several field trips will acquaint students with the rich invertebrate fauna of the San Juan Islands.

The class is at the graduate student level, but exceptionally qualified undergraduate students will be considered. Enrollment is limited to 12 students.

For additional information, contact: bjswalla@u.washington.edu or sleys@ualberta.ca

 

FUNCTIONAL MORPHOLOGY AND ECOLOGY OF MARINE FISHES

Session A June 12 - July 15, 2006
5 weeks: M-F 8-5; S 8-12
Fish 565 (9 credits)

Dr. Adam P. Summers and Dr. Lara Ferry-Graham

The course will use the diverse marine fish community of the San Juan Islands as a tool for exploring the relationship between functional morphology and ecology. Students in the course will learn: 1) the evolutionary history and relationships of the major radiations of bony and cartilaginous fishes; 2) the tools and techniques of collecting; 3) the tools and techniques of functional morphology. For the first several weeks of the course there will be daily lectures and field trips to familiarize students with the basic tools and animals that they will need for the latter portion of the course. For the second half of the course students will pursue an independent research project. A variety of projects will be suggested but it is also possible to come up with a completely original project based on personal interest. In the past, projects have covered a wide range of topics including purely ecological, eco-morphology, comparative physiology, comparative morphology and functional morphology. The course will culminate in an oral and written presentation of the results of the research project.

The class is at the graduate student level, but exceptionally qualified undergraduate students will be considered. Enrollment is limited to 14 students.


For additional information contact: asummers@uci.edu or lfgraham@mlml.calstate.edu

 

SUMMER Session B 2006

For information contact: fhladmin@u.washington.edu

The 5-week courses in summer are intended primarily for graduate students, with the exception of Marine Invertebrate Zoology. Courses may be taken sequentially, i.e., one in each summer session, but not concurrently. Well-qualified undergraduates may be admitted to graduate level courses with the consent of the Director and the faculty involved.

 

MARINE ALGAE (Seaweed Biodiversity and Ecology)

Session B July 17 - August 19, 2006
5 weeks: M-F 8-5; S 8-12
Biology 539 (9 credits)

Dr. J. Robert Waaland and Dr. Thomas F. Mumford, Jr.

This course explores marine algae with emphasis on their role in marine ecosystems. The course will have four key components. 1) Investigating seaweed diversity and the practical skills essential for identification of these organisms will be examined through field forays and laboratory studies of seaweed-dominated cool temperate water communities accessible in the San Juan Archipelago and on the exposed outer coast of Vancouver Island. 2) The functional role of seaweeds in marine ecosystems will be examined through discussion, laboratory and field methods emphasizing the role of seaweeds as primary producers in coastal marine communities, their functional morphology and their interactions with other members of the marine community (e.g., role in food webs and as habitat). 3) Quantitative analysis of the distributions and abundances of seaweed populations will be investigated with a combination of lectures and field and lab exercises. Emphasis will be placed on study designs, sampling procedures, methods of data analysis, and data interpretation. 4) Methods for cultivation of seaweeds will be investigated for use at laboratory to commercial scale as a tool to elucidate algal life histories, growth patterns and rates, physiological responses, ecosystem mesocosm experiments, and for production of food and chemicals.

Graduate students and advanced undergraduates students (juniors, seniors) are encouraged to apply. Enrollment limited to 12 students.

For additional information contact: jrw@u.washington.edu or tom.mumford@wadnr.gov

 

COASTAL AND ESTUARINE FLUID DYNAMICS

Session B July 17 - August 19, 2006
5 weeks: M-F 8-5; S 8-12
Ocean 578 (9 credits)

Dr. Parker MacCready and Dr. W. Rockwell Geyer

This is a class on the physics of estuarine and coastal regions, aimed at Physical Oceanography grad students. It emphasizes fundamentals of stratified, turbulent fluid mechanics, with high level application of the fundamentals to estuarine, river plume, and other systems. The field experiments are, in large measure, planned by the students as part of the educational experience. In the past these have led to student presentations of their research at national meetings.

Enrollment limited to 12 students.

For additional information contact: parker@ocean.washington.edu

 

PREDATOR-PREY INTERACTIONS: Experimental and Field Approaches

Session B July 17 - August 19, 2006
5 weeks: M-F 8-5; S 8-12
Biology 533 (9 credits)

Dr. Michal Kowalewski and Dr. Lindsey Leighton

This course will explore experimental and practical field approaches to predator-prey interactions. Predation plays a key role in many ecosystems and may have been critical in shaping the evolution of life on our planet. Predator-prey interactions affect nearly every animal and provide a rich source of data of interest to biologists and paleobiologists. The lectures will review optimization models (ESS, OFT, etc.), behavioral/ecological aspects of predator-prey interactions, the long-term evolutionary consequences of predation (e.g., Escalation Hypothesis), experimental/field methods used to study predation in modern environments, and data acquisition strategies used by paleontologists in the fossil record. Lectures, laboratory exercises, and field activities will be explicitly integrated. Students will also be required to conduct a small, independent research project during the course. Several field trips (including boat dredging) will
be included to acquaint students with practical aspects of research on predator-prey interactions. The field trips may also serve to obtain data for individual student projects.

Enrollment limited to 15 students.

For additional information contact: michalk@vt.edu or leighton@geology.sdsu.edu

 

LARVAL BIOLOGY

Session B JULY 17 - August 19, 2006
5 weeks: M-F 8-5; S 8-12
Biology 533 (9 credits)

Dr. Richard Emlet and Dr. Richard Strathmann

Emphasis is on functional requirements and constraints for embryos, larvae, and juveniles of marine animals. Topics include parental investment per ovum, fertilization, parental protection and retention of embryos, extraembryonic nutrition, larval feeding and swimming, functional morphology of embryos and larvae, dispersal, settling, mortality, recruitment, effects of larval nutrition on performance of juveniles, juvenile ecology, and evolutionary transitions between modes of development. The course includes two short research projects by groups of 2 or more students with a short written paper from each project. One or two lectures each day and discussion of a published research paper each week provide background on this field of research. The course also includes demonstration of methods to the whole class.

Enrollment limited to 12 students.

For additional information contact: remlet@darkwing.uoregon.edu or rrstrath@u.washington.edu

SUMMER Session A & B 2006

RESEARCH APPRENTICESHIPS
(for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates)

Research apprenticeships at FHL are generally offered for a full academic quarter (10-11 weeks) in Spring, Summer and Autumn Quarters. There will be one option in Summer A and B sessions. For 2006 research apprenticeship descriptions and information go to Research Apprenticeships 2006.

 

AUTUMN SEMESTER 2006

RESEARCH APPRENTICESHIPS
(for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates)

Research apprenticeships at FHL are generally offered for a full academic quarter (10-11 weeks) in Spring, Summer and Autumn Quarters. NEW for 2006: there will be one 16-week Autumn Semester research apprenticeship. For 2006 research apprenticeship descriptions and information go to Research Apprenticeships 2006.

 

AUTUMN QUARTER 2006

RESEARCH APPRENTICESHIPS
(for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates)

There will be three research apprenticeship choices in Autumn 2006 (September 26-December 10). For research apprenticeship descriptions and information go to Undergraduate Research Apprenticeships.

 

Beam Reach Program

10 weeks, August 21 - October 30, 2006, rolling admissions.

Independent Study for UW Graduate Students

During all quarters, graduate students may register for research with the consent of their faculty advisors.

600 Independent Study or Research

700 Master's Thesis

800 Doctoral Dissertation

 

2005 Courses

2004 Course archive.