Friday Harbor Laboratories
last modified 9-23-09

2009 Courses of Instruction
Spring, Summer and Autumn

FHL COURSE LIST 2009

SPRING QUARTER
Mar 30-Jun 5 (10 weeks), three options:


1) THE ZOO-BOT QUARTER:
Marine Zoology + Marine Botany + Marine Benthic Research Apprenticeship
3 integrated courses, 16 total credits (Biol 430, 5 credits + Biol 445, 5 credits + Biol 499, 6 credits) $1200 stipend from FHL 2) RESEARCH APPRENTICESHIP:
Dynamics of Cellular Morphogenesis: Experiments and Computer Simulations
(Biol 499, 15 credits) $3000 stipend from FHL

3) BEAM REACH PROGRAM, Mar. 30- Jun. 5
(Ocean 360 + Ocean 365, 18 total credits)
SUMMER SESSION A
review begins Feb. 1
Jun 15-Jul 17 (5 weeks)
4 course options, 9 credits each
(one undergraduate-level course, Biol 432,
three graduate-level courses, numbered 500+):

1) MARINE INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY
(Biol 432)

2) FISH SWIMMING
(Fish 565)

3) COMPARATIVE INVERTEBRATE EMBRYOLOGY
(Biol 533)

4) MARINE ALGAE
(Biol 539)

SUMMER SESSION B
Jul 20-Aug 21 (5 weeks), three graduate-level courses, 9 credits each:


1) MARINE BIOACOUSTICS (Fish 507)

2) LARVAL BIOLOGY
(Biol 533)

3) ESTUARINE AND COASTAL FLUID DYNAMICS
(Ocean 590)

BLINKS RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP
(Summer, 8-12 weeks) Seeking senior undergrads, post-bacs or grad students from diverse cultural backgrounds, especially those under-represented in the sciences; includes financial support.

AUTUMN QUARTER

Sept 28 - Dec 11 (11 weeks), three options:

1) SEMINAR IN ORGANISMAL BIOLOGY

2) MARINE BIOLOGY QUARTER:
3 of the following 4 courses,15 or 16 total credits:

- Marine Biology (5 credits: Biol 250, Ocean 250 or Fish 250)
- Social Change and the Marine Environment (5 credits, Envir 450 or Soc 401)
- Scientific Diving (5 credits, Biol 499)
- Marine Environment Research Apprenticeship
(6 credits: Biol 479, Fish 479, Ocean 479, Envir 499 or Soc 499).

3) RESEARCH APPRENTICESHIP: Pelagic Ecosystem Function in the San Juan Archipelago (Ocean 492, 15 credits.)

4) BEAM REACH PROGRAM , Aug. 23 -Oct. 31
(Ocean 360 + Ocean 365, 18 total credits).

Independent Study
Friday Harbor Laboratories (FHL), part of the University of Washington, offers coursework for undergraduates, post-baccalaureates and graduate students.

Spring and autumn sessions run a full academic quarter (10-11 weeks) with courses and research apprenticeships targeted to undergraduates and post-baccalaureates.

In summer FHL offers six graduate-level courses plus one undergraduate-level course. Summer courses run 5 weeks in one of two summer sessions.

Courses and research apprenticeships at Friday Harbor Laboratories require a full-time commitment: in Spring Quarter and Autumn Quarter this normally includes all day Monday-Friday; courses in summer include all day Monday-Friday plus Saturday mornings.

Students in all courses and research apprenticeships earn credits through the University of Washington (UW) but do not need to be currently enrolled at UW in order to attend; students come to FHL from all over the world.

During all quarters, graduate students may register for research at FHL with the consent of their faculty advisors: Independent Study or Research (600 level course), Master's Thesis (700 level course), Doctoral Dissertation (800 course).

Students generally live in double-occupancy dormitories on the FHL campus with meals provided in the FHL Dining Hall. FHL has limited capacity to house family members of students. If you would like your familiy to accompany you, please submit a request as early as possible.

FHL is sited on a 484-acre biological preserve on San Juan Island (75 miles NW of Seattle) accessible by scheduled ferry service, float plane and commuter aircraft, or by charter airline.

Accepted students should plan to arrive at FHL on the Sunday afternoon or evening the day before class begins, and may depart on the final Friday of the session following lab clean up, normally completed by about noon.


Admission decisions are usually made within three to five weeks following the application deadline, and applicants will be notified via email.

See the FHL Student Costs webpage for information about costs.

TRANSCRIPTS: to receive a transcript for a course or apprenticeship completed at FHL, follow instructions provided at the following University of Washington web site: http://washington.edu/students/ reg/transcripts.html#Q1.


SPRING QUARTER 2009

The Zoo-Bot Quarter:
MARINE ZOOLOGY, MARINE BOTANY and MARINE BENTHIC ECOLOGY

March 30 - June 5, 2009 (10 weeks)
Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Arrive Sunday, March 29 after 3 pm, depart Friday, June 5 after lunch.

Students must register concurrently for all three integrated courses for a total of 16 credits:
Biology 430 (5 credits) Marine Zoology
Biology 445 (5 credits) Marine Botany
Biology 499 (6 credits) Marine Benthic Ecology Research Apprenticeship ($1200 in FHL support)

Dr. Megan Dethier, Department of Biology, University of Washington
Dr. Emily Carrington, Department of Biology, University of Washington
Dr. Kevin Britton-Simmons, Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington

This trio of courses surveys the groups of marine invertebrates and plants represented in the San Juan Archipelago; natural history, adaptations, evolution, and taxonomy. Considerable field work and detailed laboratory study of organisms is included. All students will perform organized outreach activities with the local schools. A field trip to the outer coast will allow contrasts of the organisms and ecology there. The linked apprenticeship will focus on the study of the ecology of intertidal organisms. Each student will select an independent research topic to perform in the field, laboratory, or both; examples include interactions between introduced seaweeds and native herbivores, the adaptive significance of morphological variation in marine invertebrates, variation in rates of recruitment of juvenile clams onto beaches. The apprenticeship will be integrated with the Marine Zoology/Botany program.

Enrollment limited to 16 students.

Photo: Dr. Emily Carrington

See the FHL Student Cost webpage for information about costs.

Prerequisites: Appropriate background in biological sciences and permission of instructors.

For additional information, contact
aquaman@u.washington.edu
ecarring@u.washington.edu
mdethier@u.washington.edu


 

RESEARCH APPRENTICESHIPS
(for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates)

Research apprenticeships at FHL are schedule for a full academic quarter (10-11 weeks) in Spring and Autumn Quarters. For 2009 research apprenticeship descriptions and information, please visit our Research Apprenticeships 2009 webpage.


BEAM REACH PROGRAM

Ocean 360: Marine Field Research
Ocean 365: Practicing Sustainability Science

Intensive 10-week acoustic exploration of orcas and their ecosystem, with time split between FHL campus and onboard a sailing research vessel. Please visit the Beam Reach website for information about the program, its admission process and costs.


SUMMER Session A 2009


For information please contact Stacy Markman, FHL Student Coordinator.

The 5-week courses in summer are intended primarily for graduate students, with the exception of Marine Invertebrate Zoology. Courses may be taken sequentially, i.e., one in each summer session, but not concurrently. Well-qualified undergraduates may be admitted to graduate level courses with the consent of the FHL Director and the faculty involved.

In Summer 2009 FHL is offering one undergraduate-level course and six graduate-level courses. Each course is 9 credits.

See the FHL Student Cost webpage for information about costs.

 

Marine Invertebrate Zoology

Biol 432 (9 undergraduate-level credits)
Session A: June 15 - July 17, 2009 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8 am-noon)
Arrive Sunday, June 14 after 3 pm, depart Friday, July 17 after lunch.

Dr. Gustav Paulay and Dr. Rick Hochberg

Comparative biology of marine invertebrate animals, focusing on morphology, natural history, functional biology, life history, and evolutionary relationships. Two daily lectures will provide overviews of the major and many smaller phyla, but the heart of the course comprises study of living animals in the laboratory and fieldwork in the diverse marine habitats surrounding San Juan Island.

Applications are welcome from undergraduate students, post-baccalaureates and graduate students. Prior coursework in invertebrate biology or animal diversity is advisable but not essential.

Enrollment is limited to 16 students.

Photo: Dr. James Murray

For additional information, contact paulay@flmnh.ufl.edu or Rick_Hochberg@uml.edu


Fish swimming: Kinematics, ecomorphology,  behavior, and environmental physiology
Fish 565 (9 credits)

Session A: June 15 - July 17, 2009 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8 am-5 pm, plus Sat mornings 8 am-noon)
Arrive Sunday, June 14 after 3 pm, depart Friday, July 17 after lunch.

Dr. Paolo Domenici and Dr. John Steffensen

Fish swimming is a multidisciplinary area of research that encompasses biomechanics, physiology, evolution, ecology and behavior. Knowledge of fish swimming is relevant both for students interested in mechanisms of locomotion, and those interested in locomotor adaptations to the environment.

The main subjects will be:

1) The kinematics and performance of swimming in fish using various locomotory modes
2) The ecomorphology of fish locomotion
3) Locomotor strategies
4) Metabolic aspects of fish swimming
5) The effect of various environmental factors on fish swimming.

These topics will be treated in lectures and laboratory sessions. Students will learn techniques of video analysis, kinematics, energetics and respirometry. The first half of the course will have an emphasis on lectures and explanations of various techniques for studying fish swimming. In the second half of the course, emphasis will be placed mainly on laboratory work. Students will pursue independent research projects. These will be discussed between each student and the instructors, who will also suggest a number of relevant projects. At the end of the course, students are expected to present the results of their independent projects orally and as a written report in the format of a scientific paper.

Enrollment limited to 12 students.

For additional information contact: paolo.domenici@iamc.cnr.it or jfsteffensen@bio.ku.dk

Course webpage: http://www.mbl.ku.dk/JFSteffensen/fhl/

 

Comparative Invertebrate Embryology
Biol 533 (9 credits)

Session A: June 15 - July 17, 2009 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8 am-5 pm, plus Sat mornings 8 am-noon)
Arrive Sunday, June 14 after 3 pm, depart Friday, July 17 after lunch.

Dr. Billie Swalla and Dr. Andrew Ransick

We will provide extensive hands-on laboratory experience with the fertilization and development of most invertebrate phyla including: Cnidaria, Ctenophora, Platyhelminthes, Nemertea, Brachiopoda, Phoronida, Bryozoa, Mollusca, Polychaeta, Chaetognatha, Echinodermata, Hemichordata and Urochordata.

Lectures will focus on cellular and molecular analysis of evolutionary changes in development as well as reproduction and gametogenesis. We will emphasize morphological processes and discuss similarities and differences in embryos and how they develop. Several field trips will acquaint students with the rich invertebrate fauna of the San Juan Islands. We will read and critique original literature on Comparative Embryology.

The class is at the graduate student level, but exceptionally qualified undergraduate students are also admitted. We encourage applications from foreign institutions and diverse scientific backgrounds.

Enrollment is limited to 12 students.

Photo: Dr. Lori Krueger

For additional information, contact bjswalla@u.washington.edu or andyr@caltech.edu

 

Marine Algae

Biol 539 (9 credits)

Session A: June 15 - July 17, 2009 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8 am-5 pm, plus Sat mornings 8 am-noon)
Arrive Sunday, June 14 after 3 pm, depart Friday, July 17 after lunch.

Dr. Paul Gabrielson and Dr. Charles O'Kelly

The theme of this class is principles, methods, and applications of marine algal biodiversity studies, in particular the macro- and microalgae of benthic environments. Students will learn classical and contemporary methods for the identification, classification, and phylogenetic analysis of algae; the theories underlying the methods; the application of biodiversity information in (for example) benthic ecology, cellular evolution, and natural products exploration. Students will gain practical experience in such tools as: specimen collection, preservation, and databasing; light and electron microscopy; DNA isolation and sequencing; computational approaches to phylogeny reconstruction. Field work will be extensive, as the diverse and species-rich aquatic habitats on and around San Juan Island provide ideal sites for the examination of both macroalgal and microalgal diversity.

Photo: Erin Spencer

 

We will emphasize the use of combined approaches to answer questions; individual and group projects will use morphological, ecological and molecular data to assess the diversity of algal populations and interpret that diversity in its ecological context.  A sample question: “What is the best way to find out how many species make up a ‘green tide’ algal bloom?”  At the end of the course, students should be able to use several of the tools now available to identify and classify algae and to critically assess the value of these tools in studies of algal biodiversity and marine benthic ecosystems.

Photo: Dr. Tom Mumford

This is a course appropriate for marine biologists, botanists and oceanographers with interests in marine biodiversity, conservation biology, coastal ecology with an emphasis on primary producers, and commercial applications of algae. The class is at the graduate student level, but exceptionally qualified undergraduate students will be considered.

Enrollment is limited to 12 students.

For additional information contact: drseaweed@hotmail.com or okelly@hawaii.edu

 


 

SUMMER Session B 2009

The 5-week courses in summer are intended primarily for graduate students, with the exception of Marine Invertebrate Zoology. Courses may be taken sequentially, i.e., one in each summer session, but not concurrently. Well-qualified undergraduates may be admitted to graduate level courses with the consent of the Director and the faculty involved.

 

Marine Bioacoustics
Fish 507 (9 credits)

Session B: July 20 - August 21, 2009 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8 am-5 pm, plus Sat mornings 8 am-noon)
Arrive Sunday, July 19 after 3 pm, depart Friday, Aug. 21 after lunch.

Dr. Chuck Greene

This course will be held to train advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral investigators in the fundamental principles of marine bioacoustics. The primary goal of the course is to provide students with a broad understanding of the acoustic tools and techniques used to study marine organisms in their natural environment.

Lectures include the following subjects: Principles of Underwater Sound, Signal Processing, Zooplankton & Fisheries Acoustics, Marine Mammal Bioacoustics, Acoustic Tracking, Assessing Distribution & Abundance, Predator-Prey Ecology & Behavior, Data Management, Analysis & Visualization.

Many experts in the field will be brought in to participate in the instruction. Students have a unique opportunity to work side by side with active scientists using state-of-the-art tools and techniques.

Enrollment limited to 15 students.

Photo: Dr. Chuck Greene

For additional information contact: CHG2@cornell.edu

 

Larval Biology

Biology 533 (9 credits)

Session B: July 20 - August 21, 2009 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8 am-5 pm, plus Sat mornings 8 am-noon)
Arrive Sunday, July 19 after 3 pm, depart Friday, Aug. 21 after lunch.

Dr. Richard Strathmann and Dr. Richard Emlet

Emphasis is on functional requirements and constraints for embryos, larvae, and juveniles of marine animals. Topics include parental investment per ovum, fertilization, parental protection and retention of embryos, extraembryonic nutrition, larval feeding and swimming, functional morphology of embryos and larvae, dispersal, settling, mortality, recruitment, effects of larval nutrition on performance of juveniles, juvenile ecology, and evolutionary transitions between modes of development. The course includes short research projects by groups of 2 or more students with a short written paper from each project.

Enrollment limited to 12 students.

Photo: Fernanda X. Oyarzun

For additional information contact: rrstrath@u.washington.edu or remlet@uoregon.edu

 

Estuarine and Coastal Fluid Dynamics

Ocean 590 (9 credits)

Session B: July 20 - August 21, 2009 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8 am-5 pm, plus Sat mornings 8 am-noon)
Arrive Sunday, July 19 after 3 pm, depart Friday, Aug. 21 after lunch.

Dr. Parker MacCready and Dr. W. Rockwell Geyer

This course is intended for graduate students, typically in their second year of study or beyond, and focused on the Physical Oceanography of estuarine and coastal systems.  It consists of intensive lectures on basic fluid mechanics for scales relevant to estuarine and coastal systems, lectures and readings on estuarine and coastal fluid dynamics, and field experiments in nearby waters, complemented in some cases by numerical simulation. Students will complete a final written report and talk on individual research projects.

Enrollment limited to 12 students.

Photo: Dr. W. Rockwell Geyer

For additional information contact: parker@ocean.washington.edu or rgeyer@whoi.edu


AUTUMN QUARTER 2009


Pelagic Ecosystem Function in the San Juan Archipelago

Research Apprenticeship (for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates)
Ocean 492 (15 credits)


Autumn Quarter: Sept. 28 to Dec. 11, 2009 (11 weeks)
Mon-Fri 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Arrive Sunday, Sept 27 after 3 p.m., depart Friday, Dec. 11 after lunch.
Thanksgiving holiday Thurs-Sun, Nov. 26-29


For research apprenticeship descriptions and information go to Undergraduate Research Apprenticeships.

 



Seminar in Organismal Biology

Biology 590

(1-3 credits)

Dr. Richard Strathmann, Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington
Dr. Ken Sebens, Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington

This seminar continues the weekly discussions at FHL of papers in biology, except that UW graduate students can register for credit.
Organismal biology is interpreted broadly to include aspects of evolutionary, developmental, and functional biology; also ecology. The organisms do not organize themselves according to academic specialties. It is expected that participants in this seminar/discussion will differ in fields of research but be broadly curious about organisms.

Papers to be discussed will be selected by agreement of the participants. Some discussions can be constructive review of papers that participating students are about to submit for publication. the discussions will last approximately an hour, be at a time on a weekday that fits the participants’ schedules, and be at the Fernald Building at the Friday Harbor Laboratories.

For additional information, contact rrstrath@uw.edu, sebens@uw.edu



Marine Biology Quarter

Autumn Quarter: Sept. 28 to Dec. 11, 2009 (11 weeks)
Mon-Fri 8-5
Arrive Sunday, Sept 27 after 3 p.m., depart Friday, Dec. 11 after lunch.
Thanksgiving holiday Thurs-Sun, Nov. 26-29


Of the following four course options available for the Marine Biology Quarter, students will enroll in three courses which together constitute a full-time enrollment of either 15 or 16 credits for each student, i.e., students must be registered concurrently for three of the following four courses:

1)
Marine Biology (5 credits: Biol 250, Ocean 250 or Fish 250)
2)
Social Change and the Marine Environment (5 credits, Envir 450 or Soc 401)
3) Scientific Diving (5 credits, Biol 499)
4) Marine Environment Research Apprenticeship (6 credits: Biol 479, Fish 479, Ocean 479, Envir 499 or Soc 499)

Course descriptions:

1) Marine Biology
Dr. Emily Carrington, Dr. Michael O'Donnell
5 credits through one of the following three choices:
- Biology 250
- Ocean 250
- Fish 250

This 5-credit lecture/laboratory course focuses on the incredible diversity of organisms inhabiting the marine environment. During the quarter we will take a broad tour through the plants and animals of the marine realm (plankton, seaweeds, invertebrates, fish, birds, and mammals), exploring how these organisms have adapted to life under water. Numerous field and laboratory exercises will expose students to common marine biological techniques and to the diverse marine communities common to Washington’s San Juan Islands. (Note: this course fulfills a core requirement of the Marine Biology minor for University of Washington students.) Recommendation: at least one quarter of introductory biology (more is preferable). Enrollment limited to 16 students.

Photo: Dr.Tom Mumford

Check out the blog written by the 2009 Marine Biology students.

For additional information contact: Dr. Emily Carrington.

2) Social Change and the Marine Environment
Dr. Susan Thistle
5 credits through one of the two following departments:
- Sociology 401
- Program on the Environment, Envir 450 (this PoE course meets the Environmental Perspectives and Experiences requirement in PoE for University of Washington students)

While providing a close hands-on look at key problems facing the marine environment, this course focuses on the different social groups shaping such problems and their solutions. Looking at efforts to restore salmon and protect orcas, for example, we examine tribal and other views of habitat degradation and marine protected areas. We consider as well the roles played by environmental groups, individual residents, businesses, and state officials, and the varying interests and values which lie behind their actions. The effectiveness of bottom-up policy creation, in which the San Juan Islands play a leading role, rather than a top-down approach is discussed. We also assess possible local consequences of global warming, such as severe storms and rising tides, and steps to combat such warming, comparing local energy codes with those of other states, and Canada, for example. The course ends by considering the role students and teachers, and education overall, can play in marine habitat preservation and restoration. Enrollment limited to 16 students

For additional information contact: Dr. Susan Thistle.

3) Scientific Diving
Dr. Kevin Britton-Simmons, Pema Kitaeff
Biol 499, 5 credits
Enrollment limited to 8 students

The Scientific Diving Course will focus on diving skills/specialties and research techniques commonly used in subtidal ecology. PLEASE NOTE: In order to be considered for participation for this course you must have basic open water SCUBA certification and be able to provide documentation of at least 20 dives at the time of application. We expect that most incoming applicants will not be scientific divers and AAUS certification will be included at the beginning of the quarter.  Students will be required to pass a doctor-administered SCUBA physical well in advance of their arrival to FHL. Detailed information about how to accomplish this will be provided to all participants well in advance of the course.  Students will be responsible for providing their own properly-maintained SCUBA gear (except tanks), appropriate to a cold water environment. The course will include:

4) Marine Environment Research Apprenticeship
Dr. Emily Carrington, Dr. Susan Thistle
6 credits through one of the following five choices:
- Biology 479
- Fish 479
- Ocean 479
- Soc 499
- Envir 499 (this Program on the Environment course meets the Capstone ENVIR 491 PoE requirement for University of Washington students, with permission)

This course guides students in independent research from a natural or social science perspective.  Students interested in a social science approach can select from such methods as interviews, surveys, participant observation, or analysis of already existing data.  They may observe meetings of local environmental groups, for example, or interview selected island residents.   Students interested in pursuing research in marine biology can select from a range of field and/or laboratory techniques.  The course will consist of a mix of group and individual meetings, concluding with presentations by students.

Research projects to be determined by student and faculty. Enrollment limited to 16 students.

For additional information contact: Dr. Emily Carrington.

For general information about the Marine Biology Quarter
contact: Stacy Markman,
FHL Student Coordinator.

UW students are encouraged to contact the Student Coordinators in their respective departments:

Cost Information

BEAM REACH PROGRAM

Ocean 360: Marine Field Research
Ocean 365: Practicing Sustainability Science

Intensive 10-week acoustic exploration of orcas and their ecosystem, with time split between FHL campus and onboard a sailing research vessel. Please visit the Beam Reach website for information about the program, its admission process and costs.


Independent Study for UW Graduate Students

During all quarters, graduate students may register for research with the consent of their faculty advisors.

600 Independent Study or Research

700 Master's Thesis

800 Doctoral Dissertation

 

2008 Courses 

2007 Courses 

2006 Courses 

2005 Courses

2004 Courses