Friday Harbor Laboratories
last modified 1-4-10

INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS, FRIDAY HARBOR LABORATORIES

2010 Courses of Instruction

Spring, Summer and Autumn


FHL COURSE LIST 2010
(links provided to course descriptions)

SPRING QUARTER

March 29 - June 4 (10 weeks)

1) THE ZOO-BOT QUARTER:
Three integrated courses, 16 credits total:
- Marine Zoology (Biol 430, 5 credits)
- Marine Botany (Biol 445, 5 credits)
- Research Apprenticeship: Climate Change and Coastal Marine Organisms (Biol 479, 6 credits)

2) RESEARCH APPRENTICESHIP:
Genomic Biology and Physiology of Basal Metazoans and Deuterostomes
(Biol 479, 15 credits)
3) BEAM REACH PROGRAM, March 30 - June 5 tentative dates
(Ocean 360 + Ocean 365, 18 total credits) 4) SEMINAR IN ORGANISMAL BIOLOGY (Biol 590C, 1-3 credits)

RESEARCH APPRENTICESHIP:
Marine Sedimentary Processes
(Ocean 492)
Cancelled for Spring 2010,
Postponed until Spring 2011

SUMMER SESSION A

June 14 - July 16 (5 weeks)
4 course options, 9 credits each
One undergraduate-level course, Biol 432,
three graduate-level courses, numbered 500+:

1) MARINE INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY
(Biol 432)
2) MARINE ALGAE (Biol 539)
3) COMPARATIVE INVERTEBRATE EMBRYOLOGY (Biol 536)
4) BIOMECHANICS (Biol 533)

SUMMER SESSION B

July 19 - Aug 20 (5 weeks)
Four graduate-level course options, 9 credits each:


1) NEUROETHOLOGY (Biol 533)
2) ECOLOGY OF INFECTIOUS MARINE DISEASE (Biol 533)
3) LARVAL BIOLOGY (Ocean 590 or Biol 533)
4) FUNCTIONAL MORPHOLOGY AND ECOLOGY OF MARINE FISHES (Fish 565)

BLINKS RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP
(Summer, 8-12 weeks) Seeking senior undergrads, post-bacs or grad students from diverse cultural backgrounds, especially those under-represented in the sciences; includes financial support. AUTUMN QUARTER
Sept 29 - Dec 10 (11 weeks), three options:

1) MARINE BIOLOGY QUARTER:
3 of the following 4 courses,15 or 16 total credits:

- Marine Biology (5 credits: Biol 250, Ocean 250 or Fish 250)
- Social Change and the Marine Environment (5 credits, Envir 450 or Soc 401)
- Scientific Diving (5 credits, Biol 479)
- Marine Environment Research Apprenticeship
(6 credits: Biol 479, Fish 479, Ocean 479, Envir 499 or Soc 499).

2) RESEARCH APPRENTICESHIP: Pelagic Ecosystem Function in the San Juan Archipelago (Ocean 492, 15 credits.)

3) BEAM REACH PROGRAM , Aug. 23 -Oct. 31
(Ocean 360 + Ocean 365, 18 total credits).

Independent Study
Friday Harbor Laboratories (FHL), part of the University of Washington, offers coursework for undergraduates, post-baccalaureates and graduate students.

Spring and autumn sessions run a full academic quarter (10 weeks) with courses and research apprenticeships targeted to undergraduates and post-baccalaureates.

In summer FHL offers six graduate-level courses plus one undergraduate-level course. Summer courses run 5 weeks in one of two summer sessions.

Courses and research apprenticeships at Friday Harbor Laboratories require a full-time commitment: in Spring Quarter and Autumn Quarter this normally includes all day Monday-Friday; courses in summer include all day Monday-Friday plus Saturday mornings.

Students in all courses and research apprenticeships earn credits through the University of Washington (UW) but do not need to be currently enrolled at UW in order to attend; students come to FHL from all over the world.

During all quarters, graduate students may register for research at FHL with the consent of their faculty advisors: Independent Study or Research (600 level course), Master's Thesis (700 level course), Doctoral Dissertation (800 course).

Students generally live in double-occupancy dormitories on the FHL campus with meals provided in the FHL Dining Hall. FHL has limited capacity to house family members of students. If you would like your familiy to accompany you, please submit a request as early as possible.

FHL is sited on a 484-acre biological preserve on San Juan Island (75 miles NW of Seattle) accessible by scheduled ferry service, float plane and commuter aircraft, or by charter airline.

Accepted students should plan to arrive at FHL on the Sunday afternoon or evening the day before class begins, and may depart on the final Friday of the session following lab clean up, normally completed by about noon.

Admission decisions are usually made within three to five weeks following the application deadline, and applicants will be notified via email.

See the FHL Student Costs webpage for information about costs.

TRANSCRIPTS: Click here for information about requesting transcripts from University of Washington after you complete your course or apprenticeship at Friday Harbor Labs.



SPRING QUARTER 2010


The Zoo-Bot Quarter (three integrated courses):
1) Marine Zoology
2) Marine Botany
3) Research Apprenticeship: Climate Change and Coastal Marine Organisms

March 29 - June 4, 2010 (10 weeks)
Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Arrive Sunday, March 28 after 3 pm, depart Friday, June 4 after lunch.

Students must register concurrently for all three integrated courses for a total of 16 credits:
Biology 430 (5 credits) Marine Zoology
Biology 445 (5 credits) Marine Botany
Biology 479 (6 credits) Research Apprenticeship: Climate Change and Coastal Marine Organisms

Dr. Megan Dethier, Department of Biology, University of Washington
Dr. Charles O'Kelly, Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington
Dr. Robin Kodner, Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington
Dr. Michael O'Donnell, Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington

This trio of courses surveys the groups of marine invertebrates and plants represented in the San Juan Archipelago; natural history, adaptations, evolution, and taxonomy. Considerable field work and detailed laboratory study of organisms is included. All students will perform organized outreach activities with the local schools. A field trip to the outer coast will allow contrasts of the organisms and ecology there. The linked apprenticeship will focus on the study of the ecology of intertidal organisms. Each student will select an independent research topic to perform in the field, laboratory, or both; examples include interactions between introduced seaweeds and native herbivores, the adaptive significance of morphological variation in marine invertebrates, variation in rates of recruitment of juvenile clams onto beaches. The apprenticeship will be integrated with the Marine Zoology/Botany program.

Enrollment limited to 16 students.

Photo: Dr. Emily Carrington

See the FHL Student Cost webpage for information about costs.

Prerequisites: Appropriate background in biological sciences and permission of instructors.

For additional information, contact
mdethier@u.washington.edu
okelly@gmail.com
rkodner@u.washington.edu
mooseo@moosecraft.org


Seminar in Organismal Biology

March 29 - June 4, 2010 (10 weeks)
Schedule to be determined.

Biology 590 (1-3 credits)

Dr. Richard Strathmann, Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington
Dr. Ken Sebens, Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington

This seminar continues the weekly discussions at FHL of papers in biology, except that UW graduate students can register for credit.

Organismal biology is interpreted broadly to include aspects of evolutionary, developmental, and functional biology; also ecology. The organisms do not organize themselves according to academic specialties. It is expected that participants in this seminar/discussion will differ in fields of research but be broadly curious about organisms.

Papers to be discussed will be selected by agreement of the participants. Some discussions can be constructive review of papers that participating students are about to submit for publication. the discussions will last approximately an hour, be at a time on a weekday that fits the participants’ schedules, and be at the Fernald Building at the Friday Harbor Laboratories.

Photo: Bryozoans by Dr. Scottie Henderson

For additional information, contact rrstrath@uw.edu, sebens@uw.edu

RESEARCH APPRENTICESHIPS
(for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates)

Research apprenticeships at FHL are scheduled for a full academic quarter (10-11 weeks) in Spring and Autumn Quarters. For 2010 research apprenticeship descriptions and information, please visit our Research Apprenticeships 2010 webpage.


BEAM REACH PROGRAM

Ocean 360: Marine Field Research
Ocean 365: Practicing Sustainability Science

Intensive 10-week acoustic exploration of orcas and their ecosystem, with time split between FHL campus and onboard a sailing research vessel. Please visit the Beam Reach website for information about the program, its admission process and costs.


SUMMER 2010 Session A

For information please contact Stacy Markman, FHL Student Coordinator.

The 5-week courses in summer are intended primarily for graduate students, with the exception of Marine Invertebrate Zoology. Courses may be taken sequentially, i.e., one in each summer session, but not concurrently. Well-qualified undergraduates may be admitted to graduate level courses with the consent of the FHL Director and the faculty involved.

In Summer 2010 FHL is offering one undergraduate-level course and seven graduate-level courses. Each course is 9 credits.

See the FHL Student Cost webpage for information about costs.

Marine Invertebrate Zoology

Biol 432 (9 undergraduate-level credits)
Session A: June 14 - July 16, 2010 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Arrive Sunday, June 13 after 3 pm, depart Friday, July 16 after lunch.

Dr. Marjorie Wonham and Dr. Noa Shenkar

Comparative biology of marine invertebrate animals, focusing on morphology, natural history, functional biology, life history, and evolutionary relationships. Two daily lectures will provide overviews of the major and many smaller phyla, but the heart of the course comprises study of living animals in the laboratory and fieldwork in the diverse marine habitats surrounding San Juan Island.

Applications are welcome from undergraduate students, post-baccalaureates and graduate students. Prior coursework in invertebrate biology or animal diversity is advisable but not essential.

Enrollment is limited to 16 students.

Photo: Dr. Andrea Ogston

For additional information, contact marwonham@yahoo.com or nshenkar@u.washington.edu


Marine Algae
Biol 539 (9 credits)

Session A: June 14 - July 16, 2010 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Arrive Sunday, June 13 after 3 pm, depart Friday, July 16 after lunch.

Dr. Bob Waaland and Dr. Tom Mumford

This course explores the biodiversity of marine algae with emphasis on their role in marine ecosystems.  The course will have four major components:

1. Seaweed diversity will be investigated by introducing and practicing the techniques and skills essential for identification of marine macrophytes.  Seaweeds from a diversity of habitats (e.g., intertidal, subtidal, sheltered and exposed, eelgrass beds, salt marshes) will be examined through field forays and laboratory studies of seaweed-dominated cool temperate marine communities accessible in the San Juan Archipelago and on the exposed outer coast of Vancouver Island.  Collection, preservation and record keeping essential for biodiversity sampling and analysis will be emphasized.  Laboratory methods will emphasize the use of essential literature, internet databases, and microscopic examination in order to understand the morphological and reproductive diversity and the details required for identification of diverse seaweed taxa. We plan to include at least two dredging trips on the R/V Centennial for access to the deeper marine flora; we plan to use an underwater ROV to examine seaweed communities in select localities.

2. The functional role of seaweeds in marine ecosystems will be examined through discussion, laboratory and field methods emphasizing the role of seaweeds as primary producers in coastal marine communities.  The functional morphology of seaweeds and their interactions (e.g., in their role as primary producers in food webs, their function as structural elements in habitats) with other marine community components will be explored. Lab and field exercises will include introduction to selected analytical gear (e.g., dissolved oxygen meters, nutrient analysis, and data loggers for temperature and light).

Photo by A. Cheng

3. Quantitative analysis of the distributions and abundances of seaweed populations will be investigated with a combination of lectures, field and lab exercises.  Emphasis will be placed on study designs, sampling procedures, methods of data analysis and data interpretation.  Students will obtain experience with different field methods of sampling seaweeds and with handling and analyzing population and community data.  Various approaches for analyzing assemblage or community data will be discussed and supported by computer sessions with relevant software.  Practical applications such as the design of monitoring programs at multiple scales will be addressed; prior statistical knowledge is not a prerequisite.

4. Methods for cultivation of seaweeds will be investigated for use at laboratory to commercial scales as tools to elucidate algal life histories, growth rates and development patterns, and physiological responses.  The use of mesocosms as experimental systems, and for production of food, chemicals and restoration will be discussed.  Special emphasis will be placed on kelp monitoring and restoration techniques in the vicinity of Friday Harbor.

This is a course appropriate for marine biologists, botanists and ecologists as well as oceanographers with interests in marine biodiversity, conservation biology, and coastal ecology with an emphasis on macroalgal primary producers. Graduate students and advanced undergraduates students (juniors, seniors) are encouraged to apply.

The FHL facilities and environment provide the ideal combination of laboratory facilities, housing and a great variety of marine habitat types with high biodiversity representative of cool-temperate marine habitats which are widely distributed throughout temperate regions of the world. Ready access to a diversity of field sites, to small boats, a larger research vessel, labs with seawater aquaria for maintaining specimens and conducting experiments, excellent microscopy facilities, an excellent library and computing facilities with internet access make this an ideal environment for this course.

Enrollment limited to 12 students.

For additional information contact Bob Waaland (jrw@washington.edu) or Tom Mumford (Thomas.Mumford@dnr.wa.gov).

 

Comparative Invertebrate Embryology
Biol 536 (9 credits)

Session A: June 14 - July 16, 2010 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Arrive Sunday, June 13 after 3 pm, depart Friday, July 16 after lunch.

Dr. Billie Swalla and Dr. Alexandra Eaves

Comparative Invertebrate Embryology will focus on the development of invertebrate phyla with an evolutionary perspective. We will provide extensive hands-on laboratory experience with the fertilization and development of most invertebrate phyla including: Cnidaria, Ctenophora, Platyhelminthes, Nemertea, Brachiopoda, Phoronida, Bryozoa, Mollusca, Polychaeta, Chaetognatha, Echinodermata, Hemichordata and Tunicata.

The lectures will focus on cellular and molecular analysis of evolutionary changes in development as well as reproduction and gametogenesis. We will emphasize morphological processes and discuss similarities and differences in embryos and how they develop. We will read and critique original literature on Comparative Embryology. Several field trips will acquaint students with the rich invertebrate fauna of the San Juan Islands. Class meets Monday-Friday 8-5 and Saturday 8-12. The class is at the graduate student level, but exceptionally qualified undergraduate students are also admitted. We encourage applications from foreign institutions and diverse scientific backgrounds.

Photo: Greg Gavelis, University of Oregon, student in Comparative Invertebrate Embryology, 2008

Enrollment is limited to 12 students.

For additional information, contact bjswalla@u.washington.edu or alex.eaves@cahs-bc.ca

 

Biomechanics

Biol 533 (9 credits)

Session A: June 14 - July 16, 2010 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Arrive Sunday, June 13 after 3 pm, depart Friday, July 16 after lunch.

Dr. Emily Carrington, Dr. John Gosline

This course uses an engineering perspective to evaluate the mechanical design of organisms.  We will develop an understanding of the diversity of ways organisms construct materials, organize body plans, and interact with their physical environment.  We will explore the basic principles of both solid and fluid mechanics, and apply these principles to specific biological examples.  The emphasis will be on the design of marine organisms (especially invertebrates and seaweeds), but terrestrial examples will be drawn upon as well. 



Photo by L. Coutts


Topics covered will include: basic laws of fluid motion, life in boundary layers, turbulence and mixing, mechanical properties of biological materials, static and dynamic beam theory,

mechanical design for the surf zone, phenotypic plasticity in mechanical design, and biomechanical techniques. This course is quantitative; a basic understanding of calculus and physics is assumed.

Our activities will be focused around two major themes that are current hot topics in the field of biomechanics: 1) Ecomechanics.  Organisms must perform within the constraints of their physical environment.  How have environmental parameters guided the evolution of organismal form and function and how will future shifts in climate (temperature, water motion, ocean acidification, etc.) affect organismal form and function?  2) Biomaterials.  Material scientists are increasingly looking to nature for inspiration in the design of high performance materials, such as the strong underwater adhesives of barnacles, the tough durable tethers of mussels, and the fracture resistance of snail shells.  How many other marine biomaterials could be considered “high performing”? To date, relatively few marine biomaterials have been adequately characterized; the richly diverse biota of the San Juan Islands will undoubtedly provide for novel observations.  FHL is the ideal setting for this course because of the diversity of marine flora and fauna available and the accessibility of broad range of habitats.

The first three weeks of the course will be devoted to topical lectures, field trips, and laboratory exercises.  Problem sets will be assigned to reinforce principles covered in the lectures and labs.  Field trips will introduce students to the rich biota of area, as well as the diversity of habitats common to the San Juan Islands.  Laboratory exercises will introduce students to state-of-the-art biomechanical techniques and require written lab reports.  Topics covered will include: measuring flow in the lab and field, static testing of materials, dynamic testing, beam theory, fracture mechanics, fatigue failure, hydrodynamic forces in a flume, flow visualization, field force measurement (tenacity & hydrodynamic), wave mechanics, measurement and instrumentation (force transducers, field devices, optical methods, etc.).

The final two weeks of the course will be devoted to independent student projects.  Students will design their own experiments, develop protocols, gather data, and interpret their results with respect to other related studies. The final products are 1) an oral presentation and 2) a scientific paper.

Enrollment is limited to 12 students.

For additional information contact: ecarring@u.washington.edu or gosline@zoology.ubc.ca



Photo by M. Boller


SUMMER 2010 Session B

For information please contact Stacy Markman, FHL Student Coordinator.

The 5-week courses in summer are intended primarily for graduate students, with the exception of Marine Invertebrate Zoology. Courses may be taken sequentially, i.e., one in each summer session, but not concurrently. Well-qualified undergraduates may be admitted to graduate level courses with the consent of the Director and the faculty involved.

In Summer 2010 FHL is offering one undergraduate-level course and seven graduate-level courses. Each course is 9 credits.

See the FHL Student Cost webpage for information about costs.

Neuroethology
Biol 533 (9 credits)

Session B: July 19 - August 20, 2010 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Arrive Sunday, July 18 after 3 pm, depart Friday, Aug. 20 after lunch.

Dr. Jim Murray, Dr. Shaun Cain

This animation is derived from a confocal image stack of four neurons that have been injected with a fluorescent tracer.  The largest cell body is ~100 microns wide.  By Dr. Jim Murray.

This 5-week graduate course will focus on learning techniques in neuroethological research such as behavioral recording and analysis, electrophysiology of intact and reduced preparations, voltage clamp and pharmacology, immunohistochemistry, and confocal microscopy of neural structures.  Each pair of students will explore a project that helps them to learn the techniques that they need in their own research.  Research here will focus on the nudibranch sea slug Tritonia diomedea because it is amenable to neuroethological analysis.  Lectures will focus on background necessary to understand fundamental techniques in neurophysiology.

This course is one of very few advanced courses offered worldwide on advanced topics in the neurobiology of behavior.  Neuroscience, like molecular biology and genetics, has tended over recent decades to emphasize reductionistic techniques that have been extremely fruitful in illuminating the basic principles of how cells interact to produce nervous systems.  But now we find that our ability to collect large data sets of recordings from dozens or hundreds of nerve cells have often outstripped our ability to relate these data back to the behavior of the organism, and ultimately to the ecological context of that behavior.  The Tritonia sea slug has served as a model system both in this reductionist approach, but also in a complementary integrative approach to relating the activities of multiple nerve cells to behavior in a natural context. The system is now ripe for an integrative approach to show how animals orient using multimodal sensory cues and how their brains make ecologically-relevant decisions on a cellular level (e.g. should a slug turn right if it smells both food and predator).

Students will be paired-up for 4-week projects, and we will set up a "rig" of electronic equipment for each group.  These rigs will include amplifiers of neural activity, analog/digital interfaces to record data onto computers, microscopes to help guide the recording electrodes, and other devices as necessary.  We will instruct students in techniques such as intracellular recording, single-cell inactivation, whole nerve recording, and fine-wire recording in freely-moving animals.  We will also teach students how to track animal movement in an large tank using cameras computer software, how to analyze video of body movement, and how to correlate movement with neural activity.  Students can compare the behavior of sham-operated animals with that of animals whose cells have been inactivated using drugs.  Students will also learn to label specific nerve cells using iontophoresis of fluorescent tracers, to immunolabel or use in situ hybridization, and to section and process tissue for confocal microscopy. 

Neuroethology has historically been characterized by a focus on comparative, interdisciplinary, integrative, evolutionary, and ecologically-relevant approaches.  FHL has traditionally emphasized these approaches is the ideal location for the study of the neuroethology of navigation in Tritonia and other sea slugs.

Links to additional information:

http://gallery.me.com/tritoniadiomedea#100065&bgcolor=black&view=grid

http://depts.washington.edu/fhl/biol533a/

Enrollment limited to 12 students.

Photo: Dr. Jim Murray. The marine slug Tritonia diomedea glides on its foot and explores its world with a touch and taste sensitive oral veil (mustached like anterior tentacles), and it smells food and mates using its posterior head tentacles known as "rhinophores").

For additional information contact: shaun.cain@eou.edu or james.murray@csueastbay.edu

 

Ecology of Infectious Marine Disease

Biology 533 (9 credits)

Session B: July 19 - August 20, 2010 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Arrive Sunday, July 18 after 3 pm, depart Friday, Aug. 20 after lunch.

Dr. Drew Harvell, Dr. Carolyn Friedman, and Dr. Steven Roberts

Infectious diseases of marine organisms are on the increase, and yet processes governing host infectivity and pathogen virulence are poorly known, especially for non-commercial marine invertebrates. Indeed, one of the emerging frontiers in ocean research is invertebrate-microbial interactions. Despite these knowledge gaps, the prediction is that diseases will increase in warming oceans and become an ever-present component of near-shore ecological interactions. This course will be a training program in invertebrate-pathogen ecology that will bring together and train the future leaders in this rapidly emerging, multidisciplinary field. The course will 1) survey host-pathogen interaction in the Friday Harbor region, 2) teach diagnostic tools for identifying viral, bacterial, protozoan and fungal infections of invertebrates, 3) teach approaches to examine the invertebrate innate immune response to different pathogens, and finally 4) use these methods to address ecological questions about the distribution of pathogenic interactions, and the experimental effects of temperature and increased acidification on interactions.

A primary goal of the program is to provide advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral investigators with a broad understanding of host-pathogen interactions as well as the techniques used to study the ecology of marine animals in situ. By bringing together top researchers in host-pathogen interactions, we provide students with a unique opportunity to work side by side with world experts using state-of-the-art tools and technologies. The program also provides a setting for developing and testing new technologies and methods. We also hope it will serve as a research magnet, attracting leading scientists to conduct their own research in a creative teaching and learning environment that catalyzes interactions across the various disciplines associated with Marine Disease Ecology.

In a broader sense, this project will add to our limited understanding of how climate change affects the ecological health of temperate coastal communities. It will also help to address basic information gaps concerning direct biological effects of climate change on susceptible species and the dynamics of parasitism and symbiosis. This understanding is critical to developing realistic management schemes for mitigating impacts of climate change.

Enrollment limited to 12-16 students.

Photos: Dr. Drew Harvell

For additional information contact: cdh5@cornell.edu, carolynf@u.washington.edu, or sr320@u.washington.edu

 

Larval Biology

Ocean 590 or Biology 533 (9 credits)
Session B: July 19 - August 20, 2010 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Arrive Sunday, July 18 after 3 pm, depart Friday, Aug. 20 after lunch.

Dr. Danny Grunbaum, Dr. Richard Strathmann

The emphasis will be on functional requirements and constraints for embryos, larvae, and juveniles of marine animals. Topics include maternal investment per ovum, fertilization, parental protection and retention of embryos, extraembryonic nutrition, larval feeding and swimming, functional morphology of embryos and larvae, dispersal, settling, mortality, recruitment, effects of larval nutrition on performance of juveniles, juvenile ecology, and evolutionary transitions between modes of development.D. Grünbaum brings experience with the effects of currents, turbulence, swimming biomechanics and larval behavior on larval distributions. R. Strathmann’s research is on functional constraints on modes of development. The course includes short original research projects, one or occasionally two lectures each day, demonstration of methods, and discussion of papers.

Enrollment limited to 12 students.

Photo: Dr. Richard Strathmann

For additional information contact: random@u.washington.edu or rrstrath@u.washington.edu


Functional Morphology and Ecology of Marine Fishes

Fish 565 (9 credits)
Session B: July 19 - August 20, 2010 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Arrive Sunday, July 18 after 3 pm, depart Friday, Aug. 20 after lunch.

Dr. Adam Summers, Dr. Lara Ferry-Graham

The course will use the diverse marine fish community of the San Juan Islands as a tool to explore the relationship between functional morphology and ecology. Students in the course will learn: 1) the evolutionary history and relationships of the major radiations of bony and cartilaginous fishes; 2) basic ecological principles as they relate to fish biology; 3) tools and techniques for collecting fishes; 4) basic morphology of cartilaginous and bony fishes; 5) tools and techniques of functional morphology.


For the first several weeks of the course there will be daily lectures and field trips to familiarize students with the basic tools and animals that they will need for the latter portion of the course. For the second half of the course students will pursue an independent research project. A variety of projects will be suggested but it is also possible to come up with a completely original project based on personal interest. In the past, projects have covered a wide range of topics including ecology, eco-morphology, comparative physiology, comparative morphology and functional morphology. The course will culminate in an oral and written presentation of the results of the research project. This course has historically enjoyed a strong place in the training of functional morphological researchers and the learning goals reflect this.

Enrollment limited to 12 students.

Photos: Dr. Lara Ferry-Graham

For additional information contact: fishguy@u.washington.edu or lfgraham@mlml.calstate.edu



AUTUMN QUARTER 2010


Pelagic Ecosystem Function in the San Juan Archipelago

Research Apprenticeship (for undergraduates or post-baccalaureates)
Ocean 492 (15 credits)
*Student application review begins July 1st

Autumn Quarter: Sept. 29 to Dec. 10, 2010 (10 weeks)
Mon-Fri 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Arrive Tuesday, Sept 28 after 3 p.m., depart Friday, Dec. 10 after lunch.
Thanksgiving holiday Thurs-Sun, Nov. 25-28


For research apprenticeship descriptions and information go to Undergraduate Research Apprenticeships.

 


Marine Biology Quarter

Autumn Quarter: Sept. 29 to Dec. 10, 2010 (10 weeks)
Mon-Fri 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Arrive Tuesday, Sept 28 after 3 p.m., depart Friday, Dec. 10 after lunch.
Thanksgiving holiday Thurs-Sun, Nov. 25-28


Of the following four course options available for the Marine Biology Quarter, students will enroll in three courses which together constitute a full-time enrollment of either 15 or 16 credits for each student, i.e., students must be registered concurrently for three of the following four courses:

1)
Marine Biology (5 credits: Biol 250, Ocean 250 or Fish 250)
2)
Social Change and the Marine Environment (5 credits, Envir 450 or Soc 401)
3) Scientific Diving (5 credits, Biol 479)
4) Marine Environment Research Apprenticeship (6 credits: Biol 479, Fish 479, Ocean 479, Envir 499 or Soc 499)

Course descriptions:

1) Marine Biology
Dr. Emily Carrington, Dr. Michael O'Donnell
5 credits through one of the following three choices:
- Biology 250
- Ocean 250
- Fish 250

This 5-credit lecture/laboratory course focuses on the incredible diversity of organisms inhabiting the marine environment. During the quarter we will take a broad tour through the plants and animals of the marine realm (plankton, seaweeds, invertebrates, fish, birds, and mammals), exploring how these organisms have adapted to life under water. Numerous field and laboratory exercises will expose students to common marine biological techniques and to the diverse marine communities common to Washington’s San Juan Islands. (Note: this course fulfills a core requirement of the Marine Biology minor for University of Washington students.) Recommendation: at least one quarter of introductory biology (more is preferable).

Photo: Dr.Tom Mumford

Enrollment limited to 20 students.

For additional information contact: Dr. Emily Carrington.

2) Social Change and the Marine Environment
Dr. Susan Thistle
5 credits through one of the two following departments:
- Sociology 401
- Program on the Environment, Envir 450 (this PoE course meets the Environmental Perspectives and Experiences requirement in PoE for University of Washington students)

While providing a close hands-on look at key problems facing the marine environment, this course focuses on the different social groups shaping such problems and their solutions. Looking at efforts to restore salmon and protect orcas, for example, we examine tribal and other views of habitat degradation and marine protected areas. We consider as well the roles played by environmental groups, individual residents, businesses, and state officials, and the varying interests and values which lie behind their actions. The effectiveness of bottom-up policy creation, in which the San Juan Islands play a leading role, rather than a top-down approach is discussed. We also assess possible local consequences of global warming, such as severe storms and rising tides, and steps to combat such warming, comparing local energy codes with those of other states, and Canada, for example. The course ends by considering the role students and teachers, and education overall, can play in marine habitat preservation and restoration. For additional information contact: Dr. Susan Thistle.

Enrollment limited to 20 students

3) Scientific Diving
Dr. Kevin Britton-Simmons, Pema Kitaeff
Biol 479, 5 credits
Enrollment limited to 8 students

The Scientific Diving Course will focus on diving skills/specialties and research techniques commonly used in subtidal ecology. PLEASE NOTE: In order to be considered for participation for this course you must have basic open water SCUBA certification and be able to provide documentation of at least 20 dives at the time of application. We expect that most incoming applicants will not be scientific divers and AAUS certification will be included at the beginning of the quarter.  Students will be required to pass a doctor-administered SCUBA physical well in advance of their arrival to FHL. Detailed information about how to accomplish this will be provided to all participants well in advance of the course.  Students will be responsible for providing their own properly-maintained SCUBA gear (except tanks), appropriate to a cold water environment. The course will include:

For additional information contact: Dr. Kevin Britton-Simmons.

4) Marine Environment Research Apprenticeship
Dr. Emily Carrington, Dr. Susan Thistle
6 credits through one of the following five choices:
- Biology 479
- Fish 479
- Ocean 479
- Soc 499
- Envir 499 (this Program on the Environment course meets the Capstone ENVIR 491 PoE requirement for University of Washington students, with permission)

This course guides students in independent research from a natural or social science perspective.  Students interested in a social science approach can select from such methods as interviews, surveys, participant observation, or analysis of already existing data.  They may observe meetings of local environmental groups, for example, or interview selected island residents.   Students interested in pursuing research in marine biology can select from a range of field and/or laboratory techniques.  The course will consist of a mix of group and individual meetings, concluding with presentations by students.

Research projects to be determined by student and faculty. Enrollment limited to 20 students.

For additional information contact: Dr. Emily Carrington.

For general information about the Marine Biology Quarter
contact: Stacy Markman,
FHL Student Coordinator.

UW students are encouraged to contact the Student Coordinators in their respective departments:

Cost Information

BEAM REACH PROGRAM

Ocean 360: Marine Field Research
Ocean 365: Practicing Sustainability Science

Intensive 10-week acoustic exploration of orcas and their ecosystem, with time split between FHL campus and onboard a sailing research vessel. Please visit the Beam Reach website for information about the program, its admission process and costs.


Independent Study for UW Graduate Students

During all quarters, graduate students may register for research with the consent of their faculty advisors.

600 Independent Study or Research

700 Master's Thesis

800 Doctoral Dissertation

 

2009 Courses 

2008 Courses 

2007 Courses 

2006 Courses 

2005 Courses

2004 Courses