Friday Harbor Laboratories
Last modified Feb. 18, 2014

Spring 2014 Courses and Research Apprenticeships


Student Quotes

  • "My experience at FHL as a student … was pivotal in my development as a scientist. I was able to mingle with real live scientists, learn about their research and also experience them as people."
  • "The community of scientists is a prime draw and it happens because FHL works hard to build it through egalitarian support of scientists at all levels."
  • "FHL has been everything to my career. I came to FHL as an undergraduate and fell in love with Marine Biology. I couldn't ask for a better place to be a graduate student."
  • "It was exciting to see the great projects, some of which were even published in peer-reviewed journals, that students were able to turn out during some of the classes. It raised my expectations of what can be accomplished in a short period of time provided a supportive environment rich in a variety of resources."

APPLICATION PERIOD NOW CLOSED. Student applications for coursework in Spring, Summer and Autumn 2015 will be accepted beginning in late October 2014. Course lists and course descriptions for 2015 will be posted soon.


LINK TO SPRING 2015 INFORMATION

 

FHL SPRING QUARTER 2014
Monday, March 31- Friday, June 6, 2014 (10 weeks)
Students arrive Sunday, March 30 after 3:00 p.m., depart Saturday, June 7 after breakfast.
Classes held Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Faculty review of student applications begins JANUARY 25. Applications will be accepted beyond this date on a space-available basis. To check on space availability, please email Stacy Markman, FHL Sudent Coordinator.

 

Links:

Student Information

Research Apprenticeship Program

Summer 2014

Autumn 2014

Frequently Asked Questions - Students

Frequently Asked Questions - General
Apply
Directions to Friday Harbor
How to Request Transcripts
FHL Student Calendar 2014
______________________________________________________________________________

Four options in Spring 2014:

1) THE ZOO-BOT QUARTER

Students participate in a combination of three or four courses (16 or 17 total credits):
• Two foundation courses (required): MARINE ZOOLOGY (Biology 430, 5 credits) and MARINE BOTANY (Biology 445, 5 credits),

• plus a choice of research experience (required): NEARSHORE ECOLOGY or AQUATIC ANIMALS (Biol, Fish or Ocean 479, 6 credits of Research Experience)

• plus (optional): FHL UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR (Biol 490, 1 credit)

2) MARINE SEDIMENTARY PROCESSES RESEARCH APPRENTICESHIP
(Ocean 492, 15 credits)

3) MARINE GENOMICS RESEARCH APPRENTICESHIP
GENOMICS COURSE CANCELLED 2/17/14

(Biology/Ocean/Fish 479, 15 credits)

4) THREE SEAS PROGRAM
offered by Northeastern University at Friday Harbor Laboratories (dates to be determined)
To apply: http://www.northeastern.edu/threeseas/


Student Coordinators at University of Washington

Credits for FHL coursework will be earned through the University of Washington but applicants to FHL courses do not need to be enrolled at University of Washington. Students from all over the world come to study and conduct research at Friday Harbor Labs.

UW students are encouraged to contact the Student Coordinators in their respective departments:

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

How do students apply for courses at Friday Harbor Labs?
Link here for application procedures and, if applying for the ZooBot Quarter in spring or the Marine Biology Quarter in fall, e-mail your preferred course choices to Stacy Markman, Student Coordinator at Friday Harbor Laboratories.

How do students register for courses at Friday Harbor Labs?

Students must apply and be accepted by Friday Harbor Labs before they can register for FHL courses or reserach apprenticeships. Registration instructions will be provided by FHL staff to all accepted students. Link here for registration information.



The Zoo-Bot Quarter 2014

The review of applications will begin on January 25, 2014. Applications will be accepted past that date if space is available. For information please contact Stacy Markman, FHL Student Coordinator: fhladmin@uw.edu

The Zoo-Bot Quarter requires full-time enrollment: 16 or 17 total credits in a combination of three or four courses:
• Participants enroll in the Marine Zoology course (Biol 430, 5 credits) and the Marine Botany course (Biol 445, 5 credits), designed to complement each other and give students an overview of marine life of the region,

• plus one of the research experiences: Nearshore Ecology or Aquatic Animals (Biol, Fish or Ocean 479, 6 credits),

• and students are also encouraged to participate in the FHL Undergraduate Seminar (Biol 490, 1 credit).


To apply for the Zoo-Bot Quarter :

1) Submit the web-based FHL application form, selecting "Zoo-Bot Quarter 2014" from the Spring Quarter course list, and then

2) Email Stacy Markman to state your preference for the Zoo-Bot Quarter research experience: Nearshore Ecology or Aquatic Animals.

Course descriptions provided below.

3) Email an electronic copy of your transcripts to Stacy Markman
.


4) If you are not a matriculated Univ. of Washington student (or are a UW student wishing to apply for Mary Gates Endowment support) you should also submit, via email, your personal statement and a letter of recommendation.

*Note: FOR THE ZOO-BOT QUARTER AT FRIDAY HARBOR LABS, THERE ARE NO PREREQUISITE COURSES FOR THE RESEARCH EXPERIENCE COURSES (Biol/Fish/Ocean 479, 6 W credits). UW STUDENTS ADMITTED FOR FHL CLASSES WILL BE PROVIDED WITH ADD CODES TO OVERRIDE PREREQUISITES.



ZOO-BOT QUARTER WEEKLY SCHEDULE
Weeks 1-8: See table below
Weeks 9-10: Full-time focus on research

WEEKS 1-8
MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
8:30 - 12:00
Botany
Botany
Zoology
Zoology
Research
12:00 - 1:30
Lunch served 12:15-12:45
Lunch Break
Lunch Break
Lunch Break
Lunch Break
Lunch Break
1:30 - 4:00
Botany
Botany
Zoology
Zoology
Research
4:00 - 5:00
Botany
Research
Seminar
Zoology
Research


COURSE FACULTY:

Marine Zoology: Dr. Megan Dethier, Department of Biology, University of Washington
Marine Botany: Dr. Thomas Mumford, Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington
Nearshore Ecology Research Experience: Dr. Megan Dethier, Department of Biology, University of Washington
Aquatic Animals Research Experience: Dr. Petra Ditsche, Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington
FHL Undergraduate Seminar: Dr. Nicholas Gidmark, Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington

Faculty contact information:

mdethier@uw.edu
tmumford@uw.edu
pditsche@uw.edu
gidmark@uw.edu


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS:

The Zoology and Botany courses survey the groups of marine invertebrates and plants represented in the San Juan Archipelago; natural history, adaptations, evolution, and taxonomy. Considerable field work and detailed laboratory study of organisms is included. All students will perform organized outreach activities with the local schools. A field trip to the outer coast will allow contrasts of the organisms and ecology there.

The Nearshore Ecology Research Experience* will focus on the ecology and physiology of marine organisms and their communities. The projects are guided research, under diverse local mentors, on a preselected topic, with some latitude for students to develop their own directions. Example projects involve food web ecology, including the role of seaweeds exported into deep water habitats; assessing algae as targets for the biofuels and other aquaculture-based industries; and behavioral predator-prey observations, for instance of crabs consuming clams or protozoa consuming microalgae. Skills gained include overall conduct of independent research, data analysis and interpretation, and practice in scientific writing. UW students earn “W” credits in this writing-intensive course.

The Aquatic Animals Research Experience*
will enable students to explore a research topic in close collaboration with a supervisor. The topics are open ended but one thematic focus will be on functional morphology and biomechanics of fish and invertebrates. This could include such questions as: How does an anemone attach to different substrates? Does shark skin really reduce friction drag? Are there surfaces that barnacles cannot attach to? How elastic is a sea cucumber skin? … and many more. Ecologically oriented topics are also an area of interest. Potential questions might include: what is the impact of selected physicochemical factors on animal species? How does distribution of species change with abiotic parameters of the landscape? In close collaboration with local mentors we will provide a list of preselected topics, and students may also propose their own ideas. Students will engage in a supervised practical research experience and learn more about scientific thinking and the process of becoming a professional scientist. Techniques learned will be related to the chosen topic and could include scanning electron microscopy, mechanical testing, high speed videotaping, and flume or field experiments. UW students earn “W” credits.

FHL Undergraduate Seminar
: One lecture per week by a research scientist; all students are encouraged to attend.

Prerequisites for ZooBot Quarter: Appropriate background in biological sciences and a high interest in solving questions.

The Zoology and Botany courses survey the groups of marine invertebrates, algae and plants represented in the San Juan Archipelago; natural history, adaptations, evolution, and taxonomy. Frequent local field trips to different habitats allow study of organisms in their natural environments, and trips on the RV Centennial permit exploration of subtidal and open-water systems. Daily lectures are followed by detailed laboratory study of organisms. All students also perform organized outreach activities with the local schools. A 4-day camping field trip to the exposed rocky coast of Vancouver Island enables study of the organisms on wave-swept shores. Note: all students will need a passport or equivalent paperwork to allow travel into Canada.

*If you are a matriculated undergraduate at University of Washington you may be eligible to apply for $1200 in funding from the Mary Gates Endowment for Students (MGE). Mimumum eligibility guidelines for this MGE funding are at least a sophomore standing, 3.0 GPA and sufficient course background in introductory science courses; exceptions can be made for students with excellent recommendations and other specific information.

ZooBot Course Registration: Students must apply and be accepted by Friday Harbor Labs before they can register for FHL courses. UW students will receive Add Codes from FHL staff to access registration through MyUW. Students not matriculated at University of Washington will be registered by FHL staff. Link here for additional registration information.


Apply

Estimated Costs 2014

Student Information

Research Apprenticeship Program

Summer 2014

Autumn 2014


Marine Sedimentary Processes: Elwha River Dam Removal Impacts
Research Apprenticeship

(Ocean 492, 15 credits)

The review of applications will begin on January 25, 2014. Applications will be accepted past that date if space is available. For information please contact Stacy Markman, FHL Student Coordinator: fhladmin@uw.edu

Photo: Emily Eidam

Spring Quarter 2014: Monday, March 31- Friday, June 6, 2014 (10 weeks)

Students arrive Sunday, March 30 after 3:00 p.m., depart Saturday, June 7 after breakfast. Classes held Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.


Dr. Andrea Ogston
School of Oceanography
University of Washington
ogston@ocean.washington.edu


Dr. Charles Nittrouer

School of Oceanography
University of Washington
nittroue@ocean.washington.edu


Dr. Ian M. Miller
Washington Sea Grant
Coastal Hazards Specialist
immiller@uw.edu

This research apprenticeship focuses on the impacts of dams on the marine sedimentary system and the impacts during dam deconstruction of the release of reservoir-trapped sediment into the marine environment. Rivers deliver tons of sediment each year into the Puget Sound area, creating a variety of seabed morphologies and habitats for benthic biology. Dam removal projects are becoming an attractive means of restoration for depleted fisheries, river ecosystems, and coastlines, and we are working to understand the full range of effects these restoration efforts will have. One such effect is an increase in sediment discharge to the coastal ocean during dam removal, which, in many areas, can aid erosion control and shoreline rebuilding. We must form a better understanding of the offshore transport of sediment, however, in order to evaluate the overall impacts of dam removal and to inform over-seeing agencies as they make policies and recommendations.

The proximity of Friday Harbor Labs to the Elwha River and the timing of this apprenticeship during the later stages of dam removal (and the spring freshet) provide an ideal opportunity to conduct field surveys of the Elwha Delta to learn about active sediment dynamics and the impacts of dam removal. With help from mentors, students will design and complete individual research projects using data they collect at the delta, and these projects will become part of a larger nearshore research initiative. Research work will be complemented by lectures, guest presentations, and weekly field trips to a variety of nearby sedimentary environments (e.g., local tidal flats, Skagit River delta, and San Juan Island). Through this classroom and experiential learning, students learn about the range of sedimentary processes that occur near river mouths, human impacts on coastlines, interactions between biology and sediment, and regional geology. An informed evaluation of processes in different settings and under differing environmental conditions allow scientists to predict hazardous material transport, shoreline erosion and deposition, and change in seabed habitats due to dam installation and removal. The apprentices to be recruited for this course will have the potential to become informed scientists and managers in charge of decision-making in future restoration projects.

Photo: Emily Eidam


https://catalyst.uw.edu/workspace/ogston/23399

Students from University of Washington may be eligible for funding from the Mary Gates Endowment for Students ($3000 for a 15-credit research apprenticeship). Minimum eligibility guidelines are at least a junior standing as a matriculated undergraduate student at University of Washington, a 3.0 GPA and sufficient course background in introductory science courses; exceptions can be made for students with excellent recommendations and other specific information.

Research Apprenticeship Course Registration: All students accepted for a research apprentcieship at FHL will be registered by FHL staff through University of Washington Professional and Continuing Education (UWPCE); UW students may not register themsleves for FHL research apprenticeships. Link here for additional registration information.

Apply

Estimated Costs 2014

Student Information

Research Apprenticeship Program

Summer 2014

Autumn 2014



Marine Genomics: from Biodiversity to Evolution Research Apprenticeship

COURSE CANCELLED, RESCHEDULED FOR SPRING 2015

(Biology 479, Ocean 479 or Fish 479, 15 credits)

Integration of Genomics, Development and Neuroscience into a Coordinated Training Program to explore the origin of major innovations in the evolution of signaling systems.

Dr. Andrea Kohn
University of Florida
Whitney Lab for Marine Bioscience
abkohn@msn.com

Dr. Leonid L. Moroz
University of Florida
Professor of Neuroscience, Biology and Chemistry, Department of Neuroscience, College of Medicine and The Whitney Laboratory for Marine Bioscience
moroz@whitney.ufl.edu

 

Advances of modern genomic sciences and technologies are just beginning to be introduced into traditional zoological and comparative disciplines including marine biology. Moreover, there is an unfortunate divide between a few so-called “genomic” model organisms and a diversity of available species with unique development or functional characteristics but which lack genomic information. This gap is even more dramatic when an experimental biologist starts to address complex evolutionary questions or mechanisms of adaptation in various ecosystems including marine habitats. It is a long-desired goal of a biologist to both use a wide diversity of species for physiological tests and to integrate these experimental tests (or evolutionary hypotheses) with sufficient genomic information for any given species (or even multiple species) within months or even weeks.

 

Thus, we have developed an apprenticeship that will address these emerging challenges in genomic biology and marine genomics in particular. We would like to teach students how to integrate genomics and physiology; how to use non-traditional experimental preparations from less explored invertebrate groups and make them powerful models with extensive genomic information. In fact, during the apprenticeship, we will teach students to sequence and annotate both genomes and transcriptomes. We will design crucial experiments and introduce novel experimental models for genomic biology such as basal metazoans (Ctenophores, possibly selected Cnidarians) and basal deuterostomes (such as Hemichordates, Echinoderms and Tunicates). Conceptually, we will integrate genomic and functional analysis for representatives of these two key lineages known to be crucial in our understanding of the origin and evolution of animal organization, and specifically evolution of signaling pathways.

RESEARCH FOCUS:

 

The primary focus of the research program and individual projects will allow students to address a series of novel but critical questions: how to integrate genomic information about a given species to understand the biology of an organism and how to design functional/physiological tests to understand gene functions in non-traditional experimental models. Proposed training and experimental projects will ultimately provide insight into how animals and signal systems have evolved. These major questions include:

i. How has independent evolution (different lineages) and the modular organization of signaling systems in animals led to the formation of different types of hormonal control, nervous systems and behaviors?

ii. How are multiple signaling pathways and the activity of more than 20,000 genes integrated into the activities of specific neurons, neural circuits and developmental programs?

iii. How have developmental mechanisms, signaling transduction pathways, nervous systems and complex behaviors evolved?

iv. How have hormonal/secretory and other cell types been integrated into developmental and nervous system functions?

v. How have learning and memory mechanisms evolved? Do Ctenophores and Hemichordates learn and remember?

vi. How has the genome-scale organization of hormonal, developmental, and neuronal systems and behavior participated in speciation and evolutionary events? It is ancicipated that a diversity of types of signaling mechanisms in both basal deuterostomes and basal metazoans will form an ideal training and research foundation to address these questions both conceptually and experimentally.

 

In summary, the ultimate research goal of this initiative is to enable students to identify and characterize evolutionarily conserved set(s) of genes by direct genome-wide sequencing and comparisons across phyla. Second, students will learn how to identity and functionally explore novel signal molecules and test their unique expression in specific cells, including neurons and stem cells. We will be able to determine novel homologous cell lineages leading to formation of complex phenotypes and organ systems. The students will be exposed to a variety of organisms, with particular focus on groups that occupy salient points in animal evolution. The latter will include basal animals such as sponges, ctenophores, and cnidarians, and basal deuterostomes, such as echinoderms and selected lophotrochozoans (e.g. brachiopods, phoronids, chaetognaths). The program will explore examples of modular organization of nervous and other signaling systems across phyla. We will also discuss hypotheses and identify trends and possible selective factors leading to independent origins of motor or sensory components, as well as central nervous systems, during evolution in several animal lineages including ctenophores, cnidarians, molluscs and chordates.

 

We propose to take advantage of the marine resources at Friday Harbor Laboratories during the spring of 2012 with the objective to introduce participants to both larval and adult organization of basal animal lineages. Moreover we will encourage individual student projects that address more functionally oriented questions and help place the question of specific cell signaling pathways in an appropriate ecological context of life history transitions and their evolutionary implications. Finally, we are confident that some organisms used in this apprenticeship will be further promoted and developed as novel model systems in neuroscience and genomic sciences.  


Students from University of Washington may be eligible for funding from the Mary Gates Endowment for Students ($3000 for a 15-credit research apprenticeship). Minimum eligibility guidelines are at least a junior standing as a matriculated undergraduate student at University of Washington, a 3.0 GPA and sufficient course background in introductory science courses; exceptions can be made for students with excellent recommendations and other specific information.


Research Apprenticeship Course Registration:
All students accepted for a research apprentcieship at FHL will be registered by FHL staff through University of Washington Professional and Continuing Education (UWPCE); UW students may not register themsleves for FHL research apprenticeships. Link here for additional registration information.

Apply COURSE CANCELLED

Estimated Costs 2014

Student Information

Research Apprenticeship Program

Summer 2014

Autumn 2014



Three Seas Program

Please visit the Three Seas Program website for information about the program, its admission process and costs.

This program will convene at UW-Friday Harbor Laboratories in Spring 2014: dates to be determined
Independent Study for UW Graduate Students
During all quarters, graduate students may register for research with the consent of their faculty advisors.

600 Independent Study or Research
700 Master's Thesis
800 Doctoral Dissertation