Friday Harbor Laboratories
last modified June 11, 2013

LINK TO SUMMER 2014 INFORMATION


Summer 2013 Courses


Student Quotes

  • "My experience in FHL was one of the best in my academic background….The course filled out all my expectation about the application of marine conservation sciences in the real world. Also as an Hispanic student I could share my academic and professional experience in Latin America with my classmates and professors."
  • "FHL has an incredible task to educate future marine biologists with a holistic point of view about sciences and that is the reason why I do believe the support for this cause has to continue."
  • "Part of my integral formation as Marine Biologist and Ecologist is due to the course I attended in FHL. It was not only an academic experience but a cultural one. The opportunity to attend one of the courses you offered there was a great experience for an international student."
  • "It got me interested in all sorts of things starting with studies of development of marine invertebrates, and continuing with the nervous system! It exposed me to great joy of exploring the world around us! It changed my life forever! I was able to find great jobs! And, because of FHL I am planning on going to Masters School in marine related science!"
SUMMER A TERM COURSES:
June 17-July 19 (5 weeks), applications review begins Feb. 1 *
Students arrive Sunday, June 16 after 3:00 p.m.
Students depart Friday, July 19 after lunch (served 12:15 - 12:45 p.m.).

SUMMER B TERM COURSES:
July 22-August 23 (5 weeks), applications review begins Feb. 1*
Students arrive Sunday, July 21 after 3:00 p.m.
Students depart Friday, August 23 after lunch (served 12:15 - 12:45 p.m.).

SUMMER B WORKSHOP:
July 22-August 17 (4 weeks), applications reviews begin Feb. 1*
Students arrive Sunday, July 21 after 3:00 p.m.
Students depart Saturday morning, Aug. 17 after breakfast (served 7:45-8:15 a.m.).

SCIENTIFIC DIVING COURSE:
August 12-25 (12.5 days), applications due April 15*

COURSE CANCELLED



*Students are encouraged to apply as early as possible. Applications will be accepted past the Feb. 1st review date if space is available. For information please contact Stacy Markman, FHL Student Coordinator: fhladmin@uw.edu.

Summer classes held Monday-Saturday: Mon-Fri 8:30 am-5:00 pm, plus Saturday mornings 8 am-noon, except during the final week of the term when the final Friday is a half-day and there is no Saturday meeting.

Each 5-week course in summer is 9 credits. Courses may be taken sequentially, i.e., one in each summer session, but not concurrently. Most summer courses are intended primarily for graduate students, with the exception of two undergraduate-level summer courses: Marine Invertebrate Zoology, and Ecology & Conservation of Marine Birds & Mammals. Well-qualified undergraduates may be admitted to a graduate-level course with theconsent of the FHL Director and the faculty teaching the course.

Please note: All graduate-level courses at Friday Harbor Laboratories will be offered under the "umbrella" course Biology 533: Advanced Organismal Biology. Thus transcripts from University of Washington will list the course title ADV ORG BIOL rather than the specific Friday Harbor Laboratories' course titles listed below for graduate-level courses (level 500 courses). Students may wish to print the FHL course description or provide a link to the appropriate FHL web page to give to their home department or advisor.

Credits for FHL coursework will be earned through the University of Washington but applicants to FHL courses do not need to be matriculated at University of Washington. Students from all over the world come to study and conduct research at Friday Harbor Labs.

How do students register for courses at Friday Harbor Labs?
Students much be apply and be accepted by Friday Harbor Labs before they can register for FHL courses. Accepted students will be assisted by FHL staff to be registered through UW Professional and Continuing Education (UWPCE). Students, including UW students, may not register themselves for FHL summer courses without assistance from FHL staff.

 

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Spring 2013

Autumn 2013


FHL SUMMER 2013 COURSE LIST

Each course in Summer A Term and Summer B Term will be 9 credits.
400-level courses are undergraduate-level, 500-level courses are graduate-level.


SUMMER A TERM (5-week, 9-credit courses)

Monday, June 17 - Friday, July 19, Application review date: Feb 1st (students are encouraged to apply as early as possible. Applications will be accepted past the Feb. 1st review date if space is available. For FHL Student Coordinator: fhladmin@uw.edu).

1) MARINE INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY (Biol 432A)
2) SENSORY BIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR OF FISHES (Biol 533A)
3) MARINE ALGAE (Biol 539A)
4) COMPARATIVE INVERTEBRATE EMBRYOLOGY (Biol 536A)


SUMMER B TERM (5-week, 9-credit courses)

Monday, July 22 - Friday, Aug. 23, Application review date: Feb 1st (students are encouraged to apply as early as possible. Applications will be accepted past the Feb. 1st review date if space is available. For FHL Student Coordinator: fhladmin@uw.edu).

1) ECOLOGY & CONSERVATION OF MARINE BIRDS & MAMMALS (Fish 492A)
2) OCEAN ACIDIFICATION (Biol 533B)
3) FISH SWIMMING (Biol 533C)


SUMMER B TERM WORKSHOP (4 weeks, non-credit)

MARINE BIOACOUSTICS WORKSHOP
Monday, July 22 - Friday, Aug. 17, Application review date: Feb 1st (students are encouraged to apply as early as possible. Applications will be accepted past the Feb. 1st review date if space is available. For FHL Student Coordinator: fhladmin@uw.edu).

SUMMER RESEARCH (8-12 weeks)

BLINKS - NSF - BEACON Internship Program: Providing paid research experiences for undergrads, post-bacs or grad students from diverse cultural backgrounds.

Application deadline: March 1, 2013
Program dates: June 18 to August 10, 2013


LATE SUMMER (non-credit short course)

SCIENTIFIC DIVING
Aug. 12 -25, 2013, APPLICATION DEADLINE EXTENDED TO MAY 6, COURSE CANCELLED


Independent Study for UW graduate students


SUMMER A TERM 2013

APPLICATIONS STILL BEING ACCEPTED FOR SUMMER COURSES. APPLICATIONS WILL BE ACCEPTED UNTIL ALL CLASSES ARE FILLED.


Student application review begins: February 1st*

*Students are encouraged to apply as early as possible. Applications will be accepted beyond this date if space is available. For information please contact Stacy Markman, FHL Student Coordinator.


Marine Invertebrate Zoology

(Biol 432, 9 undergraduate-level credits)

Summer Term A: June 17 - July 19, 2013 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8:30 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8:30 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Students arrive Sunday, June 16 after 3:00 p.m., depart Friday, July 19 after lunch.

Dr. Gustav Paulay
University of Florida, Florida Museum of Natural History
paulay@flmnh.ufl.edu

Dr. Bernadette Holthuis
bholthuis@hotmail.com

This course takes advantage of the rich marine biota of the Friday Harbor region to teach the principles of animal organization and biodiversity. It emphasizes comparative study of form and function, and of complexity and diversity in phylogenetic and environmental contexts. It focuses on the study of living animals in the laboratory and field in the diverse marine habitats surrounding San Juan Island.

Alternating with two lectures a day, students will study living representatives of most major groups of marine animals in the laboratory, and through fieldwork in diverse marine habitats.The course reviews the diversity of animal life in an evolutionary and ecological context, focusing on a comparative study of form, function, and life history. We will review all animal phyla, and also explore diversity within phyla based on available exemplars.

Biodiversity is one of the most topical subjects in biology, partly because of its accelerating erosion as a result of increasing human pressures and global change. Having a working knowledge of the diversity of life is also fundamental to the study of any subject in biology. Over 90% of the macroscopic species in the marine biosphere are “invertebrates”. This course introduces students to this diversity through a study of living exemplars of most major groups of marine animals. FHL is the best location in the US for such a course, given the wealth of local diversity and accumulated knowledge built over a century of investigations.

And check out the video on the right of this species retreating into its shell (something they do not do very willingly, but all that foot does fit into the shell).

Applications are welcome from undergraduate students, post-baccalaureates and graduate students. Prior coursework in invertebrate biology or animal diversity is advisable but not essential.

Enrollment is limited to 20 students.

For additional information, contact Gustav Paulay.

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Sensory Biology and Behavior of Fishes

(Biol 533 A, 9 credits)

Please note: course is offered under the "umbrella" course Biology 533: Advanced Organismal Biology. Thus transcripts from University of Washington will list the course title ADV ORG BIOL rather than the specific Friday Harbor Laboratories' course title listed above.

Summer Term A: June 17 - July 19, 2013 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8:30 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8:30 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Students arrive Sunday, June 16 after 3:00 p.m., depart Friday, July 19 after lunch.


Dr. Joseph Sisneros

University of Washington
Department of Psychology and Biology
sisneros@uw.edu
http://faculty.washington.edu/sisneros/sisneros.htm

Dr. Stephen Kajiura

Florida Atlantic University
Department of Biological Sciences
kajiura@fau.edu
http://www.science.fau.edu/sharklab/

Dr. Paul Forlano

CUNY Brooklyn College
Department of Biology
pforlano@brooklyn.cuny.edu
http://www.brooklyn.cuny.edu/web/academics/faculty/faculty_profile.jsp?faculty=946
Photo: Dr. Joe Sisneros

This five-week graduate course control behaviors necessary for survival and reproduction in fishes. Through a combination of intensive lectures and discussions, extensive hands-on laboratory training, one-on-one interactions with course faculty, lab exercises and student-led projects, students will investigate the sensory biology and behavior of fishes at the organismal, systems, and cellular levels using modern techniques that include behavioral recordings and analysis, electrophysiology, neuroanatomy, immunohistochemistry, and brain activation imaging. Laboratory exercises will include the behavioral analysis of fishes to biologically-relevant stimuli (electrosensory and lateral line stimuli), fish vocalization recordings and analysis, morphological analysis of sensory receptor systems and associated brain structures, brain dissection, sectioning and staining, auditory evoked potential, electroretinogram and electro-olfactogram recordings, analysis of brain activation patterns and the functional mapping of neural activity during the expression of behavior via immunohistochemistry for products of immediate early gene expression.

In addition to the intensive hands-on laboratory training, students will also be required to give presentations and lead group paper discussions throughout the course. Student presentations and group discussions will focus on 2-3 research papers per week. Papers will be drawn from the current primary literature and will be chosen to complement the lecture topics for that week. The papers will be presented by a pair of students. The goals of these presentations/discussions will be two-fold: first, to improve the student’s ability to think critically, and second, to give the students a sense of the work being conducted in this field of research.

The purpose of the group discussions is to provoke in-class discussions of the assigned papers in terms of the research goals, methods, approaches, implications of discoveries, and of scientific writing. The job of the student will be to not only understand the research presented in the papers, but also to pick out its strengths and weakness and evaluate its importance in the field.

Enrollment is limited to 15 students.

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Marine Algae 2013

(Biol 539A, 9 credits)

Marine Algae 2012 Brochure

Please note: course is offered as Biology 539: Marine Phycology; this is the course title that will be listed on transcripts from University of Washington.

Summer Term A: June 17 - July 19, 2013 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8:30 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8:30 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Students arrive Sunday, June 16 after 3:00 p.m., depart Friday, July 19 after lunch.


O'Kelly algae

Dr. Charles J. O’Kelly

University of Washington
Friday Harbor Laboratories
cjokelly@u.washington.edu


Dr. Brian Wysor

Roger Williams University
Department of Biology, Marine Biology & Environmental Sciences
bwysor@rwu.edu

The theme of the course is “principles, methods, and applications of marine algal biodiversity studies”, in particular the macro- and microalgae of benthic environments. Students will learn classical and contemporary methods for the identification, classification, and phylogenetic analysis of algae; the theories underlying the methods; the application of biodiversity information in (for example) benthic ecology, cellular evolution, and natural products exploration. Students will gain practical experience in such tools as: specimen collection, preservation, and databasing; light and electron microscopy; DNA isolation and sequencing; computational approaches to phylogeny reconstruction. Field work will be extensive, as the diverse and species-rich aquatic habitats on and around San Juan Island provide ideal sites for the examination of both macroalgal and microalgal diversity.

We will emphasize the use of combined approaches to answer questions; individual and group projects will use morphological, ecological and molecular data to assess the diversity of algal populations and interpret that diversity in its ecological context. A sample question: “What is the best way to find out how many species make up a ‘green tide’ algal bloom?” At the end of the course, students should be able to use several of the tools now available to identify and classify algae and to critically assess the value of these tools in studies of algal biodiversity and marine benthic ecosystems.

This is a course appropriate for marine biologists, botanists and oceanographers with interests in marine biodiversity, conservation biology, coastal ecology with an emphasis on primary producers, and commercial applications of algae.

Enrollment limited to 15 students.

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Comparative Invertebrate Embryology

(Biol 536 A, 9 credits)

Summer Term A: June 17 - July 19, 2013 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8:30 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8:30 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Students arrive Sunday, June 16 after 3:00 p.m., depart Friday, July 19 after lunch.

Dr. Michelangelo von Dassow

Duke University Marine Laboratory

Dr. Scott Santagata
Long Island University, Department of Biology

This course provides extensive hands-on laboratory experience with the fertilization and development of diverse animals. Phyla represented usually include the Porifera, Cnidaria, Ctenophora, Platyhelminthes, Nemertea, Mollusca, Annelida, Brachiopoda, Phoronida, Bryozoa, Echinodermata, Chordata, Chaetognatha, and Arthropoda.

In addition to the basics of invertebrate reproduction and development, lectures will also include analysis of morphogenetic processes, evolutionary changes in development, and functional consequences of different modes of development. Lab time will be devoted to obtaining, observing and documenting stages of embryogenesis. Lecture and lab practice will also introduce various techniques including (but not limited to) time-lapse microscopy, in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence. Field collecting trips to diverse habitats will acquaint students with the environments in which reproduction and development occur and diverse sources of embryos.

MVonDassow

The course is intended to serve both marine biologists who wish to understand diversity in modes of development for ecological and evolutionary studies and developmental biologists who wish to broaden their knowledge of embryos beyond the standard model system organisms.
This is a graduate course, but exceptionally qualified undergraduates will be considered. We encourage applicants from foreign institutions and diverse scientific backgrounds.

Enrollment is limited to 15 students.

Faculty contact information:

mvondass@gmail.com
scott.santagata@liu.edu


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SUMMER B TERM 2013

APPLICATIONS STILL BEING ACCEPTED FOR SUMMER COURSES. APPLICATIONS WILL BE ACCEPTED UNTIL ALL CLASSES ARE FILLED.

Student application review begins: February 1st*

*Students are encouraged to apply as early as possible. Applications will be accepted beyond this date if space is available. For information please contact Stacy Markman, FHL Student Coordinator.


Ecology and Conservation of Marine Birds and Mammals

(Fish 492, 9 credits)

July 22 - August 23, 2013 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8:30 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8:30 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Arrive Sunday, July 21 after 3 pm, depart Friday, Aug. 23 after lunch.

Breck Tyler

Institute of Marine Sciences
University of California, Santa Cruz
Long Marine Laboratory

Eric Anderson

Center for Wildlife Ecology
Simon Fraser University

The Salish Sea supports a diverse community of marine birds and mammals. This intensive, field-based course offers motivated students the opportunity to learn about these ecologically and culturally important animals and the conservation problems they face. Perched at the edge of the San Juan Channel, the Friday Harbor Labs are a great place to develop the research skills needed to study a range of species including eagles, auklets, seals, and porpoises. We welcome applications from undergraduates, post-baccalaureates, and graduate students.

This course emphasizes first-hand learning and makes full use of the Labs’ research boats and facilities. Students will learn: 1) the systematics, morphology, physiology, and ecology of local species; 2) field identification and research techniques for studies of populations, behavior, diet, energetics, and other topics; 3) relationship of tides and other environmental variables to animal distribution and abundance; and 4) the status and conservation of local species. During the first two weeks, lectures, field trips, and lab demonstrations will familiarize students with the local fauna, their habitats, and relevant research techniques. For the next three weeks, students will conduct independent research on the ecology of local species and communities. Projects will cover a variety of topics and will be designed to gather data pertinent to pressing conservation problems. Students will present their results and discuss their findings in light of these conservation issues. Examples of past projects include effects of tidal currents on Harbor Seal haul out patterns, foraging behavior of molting Harlequin Ducks, and patterns in surface behaviors of Orcas.

Recent evidence suggests that populations of many seabirds and marine mammals are declining in the Salish Sea. However, available data are sparse and much additional study is needed. Student projects will contribute to a growing database of population trends in the San Juan Island region now being developed by other FHL courses and researchers. Cumulatively these data will help us better understand the ecology and status of local species.

Enrollment limited to 20.

For more information, contact Breck Tyler: ospr@ucsc.edu

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Ocean Acidification

(Biol 533 B, 9 credits)

Please note: course is offered under the "umbrella" course Biology 533: Advanced Organismal Biology. Thus transcripts from University of Washington will list the course title ADV ORG BIOL rather than the specific Friday Harbor Laboratories' course title listed above.

Summer Term B: July 22 - August 23, 2013 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8:30 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8:30 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Arrive Sunday, July 21 after 3 pm, depart Friday, Aug. 23 after lunch.

Dr. Jon Havenhand

University of Gothenburg
Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences
jon.havenhand@gu.se

Dr. Andrew Dickson

University of California San Diego
Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Marine Chemistry
adickson@ucsd.edu

Ocean acidification is emerging as one of the most pressing issues confronting marine communities worldwide. Elevated levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide are altering the seawater carbonate system and decreasing the pH of surface waters. Although the underlying chemistry of the phenomenon is well understood within the geochemistry community, the consequences for marine organisms are less well understood. This field is gaining increasing prominence within the scientific community, as evidenced by rapidly expanding body of research, recent federal legislation, and recent calls for proposals from funding agencies.
As new researchers turn their attention to studying the effects of ocean acidification on a broad range of biological systems they are frequently stymied by the inherent complexities of manipulating and documenting experimental conditions. Conducting such research requires technical skill beyond the scope of most biologists; there is an urgent need for focused training in this area. This course was offered in Summer 2011, and was a resounding success. The students conducted interesting research that benefited both our understanding of the local environments and helped troubleshoot our laboratory setup. This FHL summer course provides the ideal venue for the sort of hands-on, intensive training that graduate students need to return to their home institutions prepared to embark on productive research programs.

This course will consist of three main components. First, it will serve as a rapid indoctrination into essential topics in geochemistry, de-mystifying this essential piece of ocean acidification research. This module will include lectures on fundamental topics, practical discussions of measuring techniques and equipment and extensive laboratory experience with the critical measurement tools. Secondly, students will gain experience with a range of techniques for conducting experimental manipulations of environmental conditions. Through lectures, demonstrations, and independent research, students will develop skills to design their own experiments. Finally, the course will bring students up-to-date on the rapidly changing state of the field. Lectures, independent readings, and discussions will help the class synthesize a bourgeoning body of research.

Friday Harbor Laboratories is the ideal location for this course. The analytical facilities of the FHL OA lab offer students access to state-of-the-art equipment that they cannot be trained on anywhere else unless they are members of the few labs that have such instruments. The laboratory culture equipment and in-water mesocosms allow students to visualize how they might run experiments in their own laboratories. And, of course, the nearby natural biological systems will provide the opportunity for students to conduct research on well-studied, readily accessible organisms.

Enrollment limited to 15 students.

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Fish Swimming

(Biol 533 C, 9 credits)

Please note: course is offered under the "umbrella" course Biology 533: Advanced Organismal Biology. Thus transcripts from University of Washington will list the course title ADV ORG BIOL rather than the specific Friday Harbor Laboratories' course title listed above.

Session B: July 22 - August 23, 2013 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8:30 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8:30 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Arrive Sunday, July 21 after 3 pm, depart Friday, Aug. 23 after lunch.

Dr. Paolo Domenici

IAMC- CNR Organismal Biology Lab, Oristano, Italy
paolo.domenici@cnr.it

Dr. John F. Steffensen

University of Copenhagen
Marine Biological Laboratory, Helsingor, Denmark
JFSteffensen@zi.ku.dk

Fish swimming: Kinematics, ecomorphology, behavior, and environmental physiology


Fish swimming is a multidisciplinary area of research that encompasses biomechanics, physiology, evolution, ecology and behavior. Knowledge of fish swimming is relevant both for students interested in mechanisms of locomotion, and those interested in locomotor adaptations to the environment. The course will reflect the multidisciplinary nature of fish swimming. The main subjects treated in the course will be: (1) The kinematics and performance of swimming in fish using various locomotory modes, (2) The ecomorphology of fish locomotion, (3) Locomotor strategies, (4) Metabolic aspects of fish swimming, (5) The effect of various environmental factors on fish swimming.

Specific lectures will be given on the following topics: Introduction to local fish fauna, Introduction to fish hydrodynamics, Fish swimming kinematics and biomechanics (steady and unsteady), Fish swimming performance (steady and unsteady), Scaling of swimming performance, Predator-prey encounters, Fish functional morphology and swimming, Behavioral lateralization in fish swimming, Schooling behaviour, Respiratory physiology, Principle of respirometry, Ecophysiology of fish swimming, Metabolism and exercise physiology, The effect of environmental factors on fish swimming, Video analysis techniques, Kinematic analysis, Circular statistics, and Respirometry techniques.

These topics will be treated in lectures and laboratory/field sessions. Students will learn laboratory techniques of video analysis, kinematics, energetics and respirometry. The first half of the course will have an emphasis on lectures and explanations of techniques for studying fish swimming in the laboratory and in the field. In the second half of the course, emphasis will be placed on laboratory and field work. Students will pursue independent research projects. These will be discussed between each student and the instructors. Based on past experience from previous courses taught at FHL, a number of projects will be proposed and rated in terms of their feasibility, their originality and scientific interest. Original projects on fish locomotion, based on the student’s personal background and interest, will also be welcomed. Regular morning meetings will be held in order to discuss various issues such clarifying lecture material, planning logistic matters (fishing, sharing equipment), defining/assigning and updating each project. At the end of the course, students are expected to present the results of their independent projects orally and as a written report in the format of a scientific paper.

Enrollment limited to 15 students.

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Marine Bioacoustics Workshop

Summer Term B: July 22 - Aug. 17, 2013 (4 weeks)
Non-credit workshop

Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8:30 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8:30 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Arrive Sunday, July 21 after 3 pm, depart Saturday morning, Aug. 17 after breakfast (served 7:45-8:15 a.m.)


Dr. Charles Greene

Cornell University
Earth & Atmospheric Sciences
chg2@cornell.edu


Dr. Louise McGarry

Cornell University
Ocean Resources & Ecosystems Program
lpm3@cornell.edu


A primary goal of our workshop is to provide advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral investigators with a broad understanding of ocean acoustics as well as the techniques used to study the ecology of marine animals in situ. By bringing together many of the top researchers in marine bioacoustics, biological oceanography, and marine biology, we provide students with a unique opportunity to work side by side with world experts using state-of-the-art tools and technologies. The workshop also provides a setting for developing and testing new technologies. In this manner, it serves as a research magnet, attracting leading scientists to conduct their own research in a creative teaching and learning environment that catalyzes interactions across the various disciplines associated with Marine Bioacoustics.

The offering at FHL will be a lecture, laboratory, and field workship designed primarily to provide graduate and postdoctoral students with an intensive exposure to the fundamentals of Marine Bioacoustics. We propose to expand the content of our section devoted to animal tracking methods. Specifically, week three will be dedicated to the tracking of vocalizing marine mammals using fixed and towed hydrophone arrays, and week four will be dedicated to the tracking of acoustically tagged animals using a fixed hydrophone array. Topics to be covered in the FHL course are listed below by week.


GreeneCentennial

Week 1 Introduction to Marine Bioacoustics

Overview of Marine Bioacoustics

Principles of Underwater Sound:
Source Level
Sound Transmission
Sound Scattering
Target Strength
Sonar Equation
Underwater Noise

Signal Processing:
Target Strength Estimation
Frequency Modulation, Chirp SONARs
Echo Integration
Beamforming
Multi-Beam Imaging
Near- & Far-Field Localization


Week 2 Applications of Acoustics in Marine Biology, Fisheries, and Oceanography

GreeneAcousticEquip Zooplankton & Fisheries Acoustics:
Sound-Scattering Models
Forward Problem and Multi-Frequency Inverse Problem
Broad-Band Methods

In Situ Target Strength Estimation


Assessing Distribution & Abundance:
Acoustic Survey Design Considerations
Acoustic Survey Instrumentation & Techniques
Groundtruthing with Non-Acoustic Techniques


Week 3 Acoustic Studies of Marine Mammals

Biological Sound Classification:
Spectrogram Analysis

Localization and Tracking Methods: Fixed Arrays
Instrumentation
Propagation Models
Array Design Considerations

Localization and Tracking Methods: Towed Arrays
Instrumentation


Week 4 Acoustic Tracking of Tagged Animals

Tracking Animals with Acoustic Tags and Fixed Receivers
Line Arrays and Migration Studies
Three-Dimensional Tracking
Instrumentation

COST: $4000 workshop fee + $1154 room & board* = $5154 total to be paid before or upon arrival at Friday Harbor Labs (FHL). FHL accepts personal checks, made payable to University of Washington, cash, traveler cheques as well as Visa and Mastercard credit and debit cards.

*Room & Board: Students generally live in double-occupancy dormitories on the FHL campus with 20 meals per week provided in the FHL Dining Hall. FHL has limited capacity to house family members of students. If you would like your familiy to accompany you, please submit a request as early as possible.


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Scientific Diving

August 12 - 25, 2013
Non-credit workshop

APPLICATION DEADLINE EXTENDED TO MAY 6th

Students should arrive on Monday, August 12th before noon. Class will begin Monday afternoon, August 12th. Students depart in the afternoon on Sunday, August 25th.

Pema Kitaeff, Instructor

This non-credit short course begins with a standard check-out dive and includes all the components required to achieve current scientific diving status with AAUS (the American Academy of Underwater Scientists, see www.aaus.org for more information) and the University of Washington.

The short intensive course will include First Aid/CPR and Oxygen for SCUBA emergencies certifications and a full SCUBA rescue course resulting in PADI certification. Other topics that will be covered in either lecture, lab, or class-discussion format are local subtidal animal and algae identification, SCUBA accident management, small-boat handling, and commonly-used methods for gathering biological data underwater.

Applications are welcome from undergraduate students, post-baccalaureates and graduate students from UW or other institutions. Prior marine science experience is recommended but not required. Applicants must be able to show a logbook with a minimum of 20 dives. Students will be required to pass a UW-reviewed physical exam and to have their own SCUBA gear that meets FHL safety standards.

Total cost will be $2100. This cost will cover the course fee plus room & board at Friday Harbor Labs.

Following admission to the course, students must pay a $500 non-refundable deposit on or before Friday, June 14.

You may either call Stacy Markman (206-616-0753) with your payment by Visa or Mastercard credit card or mail a check, made payable to University of Washington, to:
Friday Harbor Labs
620 University Rd.
Friday Harbor, WA 98250
Attn: Stacy Markman

The remaining amount will be due upon arrival at Friday Harbor Labs.

Enrollment limited to 12 students.

Photo by Kevin Turner

To apply, students must:

  1. Read carefully through the information about the Scientific Diving Course before completing the application;
  2. Complete the general Friday Harbor Labs' on-line application form (Scientific Diving is listed in the drop-down menu under "Post-Summer");
  3. Download and complete the Scientific Diving Application Addendum and submit via email to Pema Kitaeff (pema at uw.edu) as a PDF file.

For additional information about the Scientific Diving course, please contact Pema Kitaeff

Application deadline: April 15

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Independent Study for UW Graduate Students

During all quarters, graduate students may register for research with the consent of their faculty advisors.

600 Independent Study or Research
700 Master's Thesis
800 Doctoral Dissertation