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Friday Harbor Laboratories

last modified Feb. 24, 2017

Summer 2017

Applications now being accepted! Application review begins February 1, 2017. Applications will be accepted after Feb. 1 if space is available.

*Students are encouraged to apply for courses as early as possible. Applications will be accepted past February 1st if space is still available. For information, please contact Stacy Markman, FHL Student Coordinator: fhladmin@uw.edu


Student Quotes

  • "My experience in FHL was one of the best in my academic background….The course filled out all my expectation about the application of marine conservation sciences in the real world. Also as an Hispanic student I could share my academic and professional experience in Latin America with my classmates and professors."
  • "FHL has an incredible task to educate future marine biologists with a holistic point of view about sciences and that is the reason why I do believe the support for this cause has to continue."
  • "Part of my integral formation as Marine Biologist and Ecologist is due to the course I attended in FHL. It was not only an academic experience but a cultural one. The opportunity to attend one of the courses you offered there was a great experience for an international student."
  • "It got me interested in all sorts of things starting with studies of development of marine invertebrates, and continuing with the nervous system! It exposed me to great joy of exploring the world around us! It changed my life forever! I was able to find great jobs! And, because of FHL I am planning on going to Masters School in marine related science!"

SUMMER A TERM COURSES (5 weeks)

June 12 - July 14, 2017
Students arrive Sunday, June 11 after 3:00 p.m., depart Friday, July 14 after lunch.
Application review begins FEBRUARY 1, 2017 *

1. MARINE INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY(FHL/BIOL 432)
2. MARINE PROTISTS (OCEAN 497)
3. COMPARATIVE INVERTEBRATE EMBRYOLOGY (FHL/BIOL 536)
4. NEUROETHOLOGY (FHL 585)


SUMMER B TERM COURSES (5 weeks)

July 17 - August 18, 2017
Students arrive Sunday, July 16 after 3:00 p.m., depart Friday, August 18 after lunch.
Application review begins FEBRUARY 1, 2017*

1. ECOLOGY & CONSERVATION OF MARINE BIRDS & MAMMALS (FHL/FISH 492)
2. SCIENCE COMMUNICATION (FHL 578) COURSE CANCELLED as of 1/27/17
3. FISH SWIMMING (FHL 528)
4. INVASION BIOLOGY (FHL 568) COURSE CANCELLED as of 2/24/17


REU SUMMER RESEARCH INTERNSHIPS (8 weeks)

BLINKS - NSF - BEACON Internship Program: Providing paid research experiences for undergraduates, postbaccalaureates or graduate students from diverse cultural backgrounds.

Application deadline: Feb. 15, 2017
Tentative internship dates: June 12 - August 5

 


EVOLUTIONARY QUANTITATIVE GENETICS WORKSHOP

Link to description and application information.

Non-credit workshop. Participants arrive at FHL Sunday, June 4 - depart Saturday, June 10.



LATE SUMMER WORKSHOP ON THE DYNAMIC BRAIN (2 weeks)

Link to description.
Application deadline: April 1, 2017
Tentative dates: August 20 - September 3, 2017



NOTES ABOUT SUMMER COURSES AT FRIDAY HARBOR LABS:

• Each 5-week course in Summer A term and Summer B term will be 9 credits.

• Summer classes are held Monday-Saturday: Mon-Fri 8:30 am-5:00 p.m., plus Saturday mornings 8 am-noon, except during the final week of the term when the final Friday is a half-day and there is no Saturday meeting.

• Courses may be taken sequentially, i.e., one in each summer session, but not concurrently.

• 400-level courses are suitable for upper-level undergraduates or graduate students, 500-level courses are graduate-level. Well-qualified undergraduates may be admitted to a graduate-level course with the consent of the FHL Director and the faculty teaching the course. Students should confer with their advisor regarding transfer credits.

• Credits for FHL coursework will be earned through the University of Washington, but applicants to FHL courses do not need to be matriculated at UW. Students from all over the world come to study and conduct research at Friday Harbor Labs!

• UW students with dorm contracts in Seattle should cancel their application and dorm assignment in Seattle within one week of confirming their attendance at Friday Harbor Labs. Log into the UW Housing & Food Services Application and Assignment Home Page and submit an Agreement Termination Notice (located under the Resident Resources header for the relevant academic year). On the HFS form, to answer the question "Where are you moving to?" please select the choice "off-campus house/apartment."

• Registration Procedures: Students must apply and be accepted by Friday Harbor Labs before they can register for FHL courses. Accepted students will be assisted by FHL staff to be registered through University of Washington Professional and Continuing Education (UWPCE). Students, including UW students, may not register themselves for FHL summer courses without assistance from FHL staff.


Additional Registration Information 2017

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Estimated Costs 2017

Frequently Asked Questions - Students

How to Travel to Friday Harbor

Student Information 2017

Spring 2017

Autumn 2017

How to Request Transcripts



SUMMER A TERM 2017

 

2017 SumA-1

Marine Invertebrate Zoology

(FHL/BIOL 432, 9 credits, Upper-Division Course (400-level) appropriate for upper-level undergraduates or graduate students)

Photo: Mikhail Matz

Summer Term A: June 12 - July 14, 2017 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8:30 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8:30 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Students arrive Sunday, June 11 after 3:00 p.m., depart Friday, July 14 after lunch.


Dr. Gustav Paulay
University of Florida
Florida Museum of Natural History
paulay@flmnh.ufl.edu

Dr. Peter Funch
Aarhus University
Department of Bioscience-Genetics, Ecology and Evolution
funch@bios.au.dk

This course takes advantage of the rich marine biota of the San Juan Islands to teach the principles of animal organization and biodiversity. It emphasizes comparative study of form and function, and of complexity and diversity in phylogenetic and environmental contexts. It focuses on the study of living animals in the laboratory and field in the diverse marine habitats surrounding San Juan Island.

Applications are welcome from advanced undergraduate students, post-baccalaureates and graduate students. Prior coursework in invertebrate biology or animal diversity will be useful; if in doubt, please contact one of the instructors.


Enrollment is limited to 20 students. No textbook is required for this course.

Scholarship Opportunity: The Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology (SICB) Division of Invertebrate Zoology is accepting applications for the Libbie H. Hyman Memorial Scholarship for the Summer Field Station Season. This scholarship, in memory of Libbie H. Hyman, one of America's foremost invertebrate zoologists, provides assistance to students to take courses OR to carry on research on INVERTEBRATES at a marine, freshwater, or terrestrial field station.

2017 information available soon
. Amount of the *2016* award: $1500 - $3500. 2016 completed application submission date: February 8, 2016. Notification of awards made by March 14, 2016.
Eligibility: The Hyman Scholarship is intended to help support a first meaningful field station experience for a first or second year graduate student or an advanced undergraduate. Visit http://sicb.org/grants/hyman/ for application forms and instructions.

Link to FHL Student Application Form

Estimated Costs 2017

Student Information 2017



2017 SumA-2

Marine Protists: Ecology and Evolution of Marine Microbial Eukaryotes in a Changing Ocean

(OCEAN 497, 9 credits, Upper-Division Course (400-level) appropriate for upper-level undergraduates or graduate students)

NOTE: Student transcripts from University of Washington will list "OCEAN 497: Advanced Special Tops in Oceanography"

Summer Term A: June 12 - July 14, 2017 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8:30 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8:30 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Students should arrive Sunday, June 11 after 3:00 p.m. and depart Friday, July 14 after lunch.


Dr. Evelyn Lessard
University of Washington
School of Oceanography
elessard@uw.edu

Microbial eukaryotes – the protists – are the most genetically, morphologically and metabolically diverse group of eukaryotes, exceeding animals, plants and fungi combined. In the oceans, protists play critical roles in the functioning of food webs and the cycling of carbon and nutrients. They exhibit astounding diversity in form, behavior and function: they can be primary producers, consumers, symbionts or parasites.  Photosynthetic protists (e.g. diatoms, dinoflagellates) are the major primary producers in most marine ecosystems. Phagotrophic protists (e.g. ciliates, flagellates) are the dominant phytoplankton and bacterial consumers, and are key links that transfer primary production to higher trophic levels. Many protists, if not the majority, are mixotrophs, capable of both photosynthesis and phagotrophy.  In the face of increasing ocean temperature, acidification, hypoxia, and eutrophication, a better understanding of the ecology and evolution of protists is critical to predicting trajectories of future ocean food webs.   

 

The goal of this course is to provide students with an in-depth understanding and hands-on study of the ecology and evolution of marine protists. Through lectures, papers and discussions, students will get an overview of the phylogeny, diversity and ecological roles of the major lineages of microbial eukaryotes. Current ‘hot’ topics and controversies in this field will be critically evaluated in student-led discussions of key papers. On field trips and cruises, we will take advantage of the great variety of marine habitats in the San Juans to explore the diversity and functional ecology of protists in the plankton, benthos, tide pools and tidal flats. Students will learn field and lab methods and techniques (including sampling, single cell isolation, culturing, microscopic and molecular methods for species identification, video-microscopy for behavioral observations, standard flow cytometry, automated imaging flow cytometry). Students will also have the opportunity to design and carry out short individual research projects.  


Enrollment limited to 15 students.


Apply

Estimated 2017 Costs

Student Information 2017

 


Photo: Michelangelo von Dassow

2017 SumA-3

Comparative Invertebrate Embryology

(FHL/BIOL 536, 9 credits, 500-level course)

Summer Term A: June 12 - July 14, 2017 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8:30 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8:30 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Students arrive Sunday, June 11 after 3:00 p.m., depart Friday, July 14 after lunch.

Dr. Billie Swalla
University of Washington
Friday Harbor Laboratories
bjswalla@uw.edu

Dr. Andreas Heyland
University of Guelph
Integrative Biology
aheyland@uoguelph.ca


Comparative Invertebrate Embryology will use hands-on lab experience to introduce students to the great diversity of developmental modes and processes found among marine invertebrates. The course will bridge cell and molecular approaches with ecological and evolutionary approaches to provide an integrated view of animal development. The course is intended to serve both biologists who wish to understand diversity in modes of development for ecological and evolutionary studies, and cell and developmental biologists who wish to broaden their knowledge of embryos beyond the standard model systems.

Photo: Michelangelo von Dassow

This course provides extensive laboratory experience with fertilization, embryonic and larval development, and metamorphosis of diverse animals. Phyla represented usually include the Porifera, Cnidaria, Ctenophora, Platyhelminthes, Nemertea, Mollusca, Annelida, Brachiopoda, Phoronida, Bryozoa, Echinodermata, Chordata, Chaetognatha, and Arthropoda.

In addition to the basics of invertebrate reproduction and development, lectures will also include analysis of morphogenetic processes, evolutionary changes in development, and functional consequences of different modes of development.

Lab time will be devoted to obtaining, observing and documenting stages of embryogenesis. Lecture and lab practice will also introduce various techniques, which may include time-lapse microscopy, confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, or biomechanical methods, depending on student interests. Field collecting trips to diverse habitats will acquaint students with the environments in which reproduction and development occur as well as diverse sources of embryos.

Scholarship Opportunity: The Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology (SICB) Division of Invertebrate Zoology is accepting applications for the Libbie H. Hyman Memorial Scholarship for the Summer Field Station Season. This scholarship, in memory of Libbie H. Hyman, one of America's foremost invertebrate zoologists, provides assistance to students to take courses OR to carry on research on INVERTEBRATES at a marine, freshwater, or terrestrial field station. 2017 information available soon. Amount of the *2016* award: $1500 - $3500. 2016 completed application submission date: February 8, 2016. Notification of awards made by March 14, 2016. Eligibility: The Hyman Scholarship is intended to help support a first meaningful field station experience for a first or second year graduate student or an advanced undergraduate. Visit http://sicb.org/grants/hyman/ for application forms and instructions.

Enrollment is limited to 15 students. No textbook is required for this course.

Apply

Estimated Costs 2017

Student Information 2017

 



2017 SumA-4

Neuroethology

(FHL 585 A, 9 credits)

NOTE: Student transcripts from University of Washington will list "FHL 585: Advanced Topics in Neurobiology and Physiology"


Photo: Shaun Cain

Summer Term A: June 12 - July 14, 2017 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8:30 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8:30 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)

Students should arrive Sunday, June 11 after 3:00 p.m., and depart Friday, July 14 after lunch.

Dr. James A. Murray
California State University, East Bay
james.murray@csueastbay.edu

Dr. Shaun Cain
Whitman College
cainsd@whitman.edu

Overview: This 5-week graduate course will focus on learning the seminal studies of behavioral neurobiology, as well as commonly used techniques in neuroethological research such as behavioral recording and analysis, electrophysiology of intact and reduced preparations, pharmacology, immunohistochemistry, and confocal microscopy of neural structures. Lectures will focus both on exemplary research and background necessary to understand fundamental techniques in neurophysiology as well as behavioral analysis. In addition to lectures and discussions, students will explore neuroethology through a project that incorporates techniques they might need for their own research.

Animated gif of neurons in the buccal ganglion of Tritonia that have been injected with a fluorescent marker and scanned on a confocal microscope to produce this 3D model

Photo: James Murray


Projects: Course research will focus on invertebrates highly amenable to neuroethological analysis such as molluscs and crustaceans that are readily available in the waters of the San Juan Islands. Students will be paired for 4-week projects, each pair with its own "rig" of electrophysiological equipment. We will instruct students in techniques such as intracellular recording, single-cell inactivation, whole nerve recording, and fine-wire recording in freely-moving animals. Students will learn to label specific nerve cells using iontophoresis of fluorescent tracers, to immunolabel neural markers, and to process tissue for confocal microscopy. We will also teach students how digital video can be used to record and quantitatively analyze many aspects of behavior and how to correlate these data with neural activity. These include tracking animal movement and measuring components body movement, amongst others. These techniques will be used in conjunction with lesion experiments to potentially isolate behavioral function to specific neurons (i.e. through drug inactivation) or parts of the nervous system (by nerve transsections), allowing quantification of behavior to compare sham-operated animals with lesioned animals. Students will have the opportunity to learn all of techniques used in the class even if the methods are not part of their course research.

More course info at: https://www.facebook.com/FHLneuroethology/

Enrollment is limited to 15 students. No textbook is required for this course, but Behavioral Neurobiology by Zupanc is recommended http://global.oup.com/uk/orc/biosciences/neuro/zupanc2e/

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Estimated 2017 Costs

Student Information 2017


SUMMER B TERM 2017


2017 SumB-1

Ecology and Conservation of Marine Birds and Mammals

(FHL/FISH 492, 9 credits, Upper-Division Course (400-level) appropriate for upper-level undergraduates or graduate students)

Photo: Phil Green


Session B: July 17 - August 18, 2017 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8:30 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8:30 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Students should arrive Sunday, July 16 after 3 pm, and depart Friday, Aug. 18 after lunch.

W. Breck Tyler
Institute of Marine Sciences
University of California, Santa Cruz
Long Marine Laboratory
ospr@ucsc.edu

Dr. Eric M. Anderson
Ecological Restoration Program
British Columbia Institute of Technology
Eric_Anderson@bcit.ca


Photo: Phil Green

This intensive, field-based course offers motivated students the opportunity to learn first-hand about the marine birds and mammals of the Salish Sea. Perched at the edge of the San Juan Channel, the Friday Harbor Labs are a great place to learn about these iconic animals and the conservation problems they face, as well as to develop the research skills needed to study them. We welcome applications from undergraduates, post-baccalaureates, and graduate students.

This course emphasizes hands-on learning and makes full use of FHL's research boats and facilities. During the first half of the course, lectures, field trips, and lab demonstrations familiarize students with the local fauna, their habitats, and relevant research techniques. Specifically, students will learn: 1) the systematics, morphology, physiology, and ecology of local species; 2) field identification and research techniques for studies of populations, behavior, diet, energetics, and other topics; 3) relationship of tides and other environmental variables to animal distribution and abundance; and 4) the status and conservation of local species.

Recent studies have shown that populations of many marine birds and mammals are declining in the Salish Sea. Therefore, during the latter part of the course, participants conduct independent research on the ecology of local species and communities. Projects may cover a variety of topics and are designed to gather data pertinent to pressing conservation problems. Working in small teams, students will design the project, collect and analyze field data, and then present their results and discuss your findings in a scientific-format paper and presentation.  Examples of recent projects include: effects of tidal currents on Harbor Seal haul-out patterns; effects of boat disturbance on marine bird behavior; prey availability and selection of Black Oystercatchers; inter-annual variation in abundance and distribution of auklets, seals, and porpoises; and feeding behavior of Great Blue Herons. Student projects are added to a growing database for the San Juan Island region now being developed by FHL courses and researchers. Students' data will help us monitor the status of local species and contribute to future conservation actions.

Enrollment is limited to 20 students. No textbook is required for this course.

For more information, contact Breck Tyler: ospr@ucsc.edu

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Estimated 2017 Costs

Student Information 2017



2017 SumB-2

Science Communication
On the Shores of Science: Theory and Practice of Science Communication

COURSE CANCELLED AS OF 1/27/17, WILL BE OFFERED IN SUMMER 2018

(FHL 578, 9 credits)

Photo: Denny Brown


Dr. Nélida Pohl
Universidad de Chile
Science Outreach Adviser, 6 Senses
Millenium Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity
npohl@ieb-chile.cl
http://www.6sentidos.cl/

Dr. Fernanda Oyarzún
Associate Researcher, science communicator and artist
Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción, Facultad de Ciencias & CIBAS
Universidad de Los Lagos, Centro i~mar
fernanda.oyarzun@ucsc.cl
http://fernandaoyarzun.com/


This course is directed to post baccalaureates, graduate students, and young (and young-in-spirit) scientists and professionals from diverse backgrounds who are interested in working at the interphase between scientific research and the rest of society. This course will provide hands-on experience with science communication by immersion in one of the most important marine laboratories of the United States. We will explore diverse relevant topics, such as the social context of science in the 21st century, principles of communication including science communication, written journalism, data visualization, scientific illustration, info graphics, photography, museum studies, as well as web and radio. Students will learn how to effectively translate scientific research for different lay audiences by exploring an array of topics on which Friday Harbor Laboratories is leader: from climate change, to ecological monitoring, ocean acidification, GFP, orca whale research, evolution, cell dynamics, evo-devo, biomechanics and more.

Photo: Panorama UdeC

Learning Objectives:
- Discuss the practice and methods of science
- Examine the place of science in modern society
- Introduce students to the principles of communication and of science communication
- Understand the requirements for communicating with different audiences
- Introduce the principles of journalistic practice
- Introduce principles of visual communication of scientific information (data, scientific illustration and info graphics
- Develop basic abilities in photography
- Develop basic radio communication abilities
- Develop basic abilities working with social media and the web
- Examine the multiple connections between science and art (from crafts to fine arts)
- Develop basic abilities for developing museum exhibitions
- Present some basic software and other tools of science communication
- Develop skills to pitch ideas

Course dynamics: Daily lectures, field trips, papers presentations and discussions will complement group and individual projects that students will be developing each week. Each week we will be covering specific topics on science communication (written, visual, radio, etc) based on relevant scientific issues (climate change, teaching of evolution, ocean acidification, monitoring and ecological research, studies of neuroscience with marine organisms, seastar larvae cloning as a defense mechanism, sea star disease in the West Coast of the US, orca whale conservation, the origin of chordates, etc). Students will work on a bigger final project on science communication on a topic inspired on FHL research to present at end of the course.

The role of the scientific communicator is to broker successful exchanges between science and its practitioners with the rest of the society that harbors them, including a variety of audiences, such as schoolchildren, teachers, politicians, entrepreneurs, senior citizens and voters, among many others. Having a basic understanding of how science and technology work together will enrich the ethical, political, financial, health-related, and environmental decisions these audiences can make. Ocean sciences, marine ecology and conservation, evolution and development —among the many lines of research developed at Friday Harbor Laboratories— are extremely relevant to the development of sustainable societies. The aim of this course is to immerse students in a privileged scientific and natural environment to provide basic theoretical and practical tools to fledging science communicators, from scientists, journalists, teachers, artists, performers, among others, to encourage them to establish dialogues that help build an informed and responsible citizenry.

Enrollment is limited to 15 students. No textbook is required for this course.

 

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Estimated 2017 Costs

Student Information 2017



2017 SumB-3

Fish Swimming: Kinematics, Ecomorphology, Behavior, and Environmental Physiology

(FHL 528, 9 credits)
Note: Student transcripts from University of Washington will list "FHL 528: Special Topics in Advanced Fish Biology"

Photo:


Dr. Paolo Domenici
IAMC- CNR
Organismal Biology Lab
Italy
paolo.domenici@cnr.it

Dr. John F. Steffensen
University of Copenhagen
Marine Biological Laboratory
Denmark
JFSteffensen@zi.ku.dk


Session B: July 17 - August 18, 2017 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8:30 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8:30 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Arrive Sunday, July 16 after 3 pm, depart Friday, Aug. 18 after lunch.

Fish swimming is a multidisciplinary area of research that encompasses biomechanics, physiology, evolution, ecology and behavior. Knowledge of fish swimming is relevant both for students interested in mechanisms of locomotion, and those interested in locomotor adaptations to the environment. The course will reflect the multidisciplinary nature of fish swimming. The main subjects treated in the course will be: (1) the kinematics and performance of swimming in fish using various locomotory modes; (2) the ecomorphology of fish locomotion; (3) locomotor strategies; (4) metabolic aspects of fish swimming; (5) the effect of various environmental factors on fish swimming.

Photo:

This course is suitable for graduate students and upper-level undergraduates as well as young researchers and postdocs interested in learning about fish swimming. Specific lectures will be given on the following topics: Introduction to local fish fauna, introduction to fish hydrodynamics, fish swimming kinematics and biomechanics (steady and unsteady), fish swimming performance (steady and unsteady), scaling of swimming performance, predator-prey encounters, fish functional morphology and swimming, behavioral lateralization in fish swimming, schooling behavior, respiratory physiology, principle of respirometry, ecophysiology of fish swimming, metabolism and exercise physiology, the effect of environmental factors on fish swimming, video analysis techniques, kinematic analysis, circular statistics, and respirometry techniques.

These topics will be treated in lectures and laboratory/field sessions. Students will learn laboratory techniques of video analysis, kinematics, energetics and respirometry. The first half of the course will emphasize on lectures and explanations of techniques for studying fish swimming in the laboratory and in the field. In the second half of the course, emphasis will be placed on laboratory and field work. Students will pursue independent research projects which will be discussed between each student and the instructors. Based on past experience from previous courses taught at FHL, a number of projects will be proposed and rated in terms of their feasibility, their originality and scientific interest. Original projects on fish locomotion, based on the student's personal background and interest, will also be welcomed. Regular morning meetings will be held in order to discuss various issues such clarifying lecture material, planning logistic matters (fishing, sharing equipment), defining/assigning and updating each project. At the end of the course, students will present the results of their independent projects orally and as a written report in the format of a scientific paper. Here is a link to a list of publications that have come out of students' projects carried out during the course in previous years: http://www.mbl.ku.dk/JFSteffensen/fhl/publications-fhl.htm

Fish locomotion is an area of increased interest, due to its relevance to fitness-related issues. For example, swimming performance can have a direct effect on survival from predator attacks, and swimming endurance can affect migratory abilities and the resources available for growth. The evaluation of swimming performance and locomotor behavior level are powerful tools of growing importance for predicting the effect of natural or man-induced changes (including global change) at the ecosystem level. For instance, research on salmon has focused on comparing the swimming performance of wild and transgenic individuals, in order to predict the impact on the ecosystem of transgenic salmon escaped from aquaculture plants. Low escape performance in transgenic salmon suggests that these may be more vulnerable to predation than their wild counterparts with important consequences for the whole ecosystem [Reichardt, T (2000). Nature, 406: 10-13]. Similarly, the effect of increased carbon dioxide on fish behavior has been evaluated using locomotion tests; fish treated with high carbon dioxide were found to lose their directional preference and to approach predators, with potential consequences for their survival in a high-CO2 environment [Domenici et al. (2012) Biology Letters 8 (1) 78-81; Nilsson et al. (2012) Nature Climate Change, 2 (3), 201-204]. Furthermore, the study of swimming performance has demonstrated its wide application to a number of other fields, related to physiology, ecology and evolution. For example, it has recently been used for assessing physiological senescence in studies on the evolution of aging [Reznick D. et al (2004). Nature, 431: 1095-1099; Terzibasi et al. (2009) Aging cell, 8: 88-99]. Because of its wide range of applicability, knowledge of the principles of fish locomotion is fundamental for any student interested in fish biology.

Enrollment is limited to 15 students. No textbook is required for this course.

Apply

Estimated 2017 Costs

Student Information 2017



2017 SumB-4

Invasion Biology
COURSE CANCELLED as of 2/24/17

(FHL 568, 9 credits)
Note: Student transcripts from University of Washington will list "FHL 568: Special Topics in Advanced Ecology and Biomechanics"

Session B: July 17 - August 18, 2017 (5 weeks)
Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8:30 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8:30 am-noon, except final week no Saturday meeting)
Students should arrive Sunday, July 16 after 3 pm, and depart Friday, Aug. 18 after lunch.

Photos: Richard Emlet


Dr. Daniel Simberloff
Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
University of Tennessee
tebo@utk.edu


Dr. Christy Leppanen
Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
University of Tennessee
cleppane@utk.edu


Overview: Thousands of species of plants, animals, fungi, and microbes have been transported by humans to new locations. Yes, without human assistance, species have always managed to spread, but much less often, much more slowly, and not nearly so far. This geographic rearrangement of the earth's biota is one of the great global changes now underway. Although many introduced species fail to establish populations or remain restricted to the immediate vicinity of the new sites they land in, other species establish populations and invade new habitats, spreading widely and sometimes well beyond the initial point of introduction.

Many invasions have such idiosyncratic and bizarre effects that they cannot fail to arouse our curiosity simply as fascinating tales of natural history. For example, who would have thought that…
• Introducing kokanee salmon to Flathead Lake, Montana, and many years later, opossum shrimp to three nearby lakes would ultimately have led to population crashes of grizzly bears and bald eagles through a complicated chain reaction?
• Introducing myxoma virus to Great Britain to control introduced rabbit populations would have led to the extinction of the large blue butterfly there?
• Introducing a particular grass species would lead to hybridization with a native congener, subsequent polyploidization, and the origin of a new vigorous invasive species that would change entire intertidal systems?

Teasing apart such intriguing causal chains is a scientific accomplishment of the first order. The variety and idiosyncrasy of effects challenges biologists to produce general laws or rules to be able to explain why some introductions have no major impacts, while others lead to huge invasions. Being able to predict which species will fall in the latter category if introduced, and which in the former, is the elusive holy grail of invasion biology.


Schedule: Class meets daily, 8:30 am to 5:00 pm. Some Saturday activities may be planned to accommodate fieldwork. Lectures/discussions/debates, laboratory/field work, and individual/group activities will each comprise approximately 1/3 of the course meeting time, with the percentage of lecture decreasing and discussions and practical activities increasing as the course progresses.

Photo: Jeffrey Goddard


Course Description: In this course, students will study the history, biology, and management of biological invasions. The course will begin with background and terminology. Students will then learn about the geography and scale of invasions, ecological effects, impacts to humans, and the evolution of introduced and native species. Differences between "introduced" and "invasive" species will receive particular attention and will inform discussions about prevention, regulation, detection, management, and eradication. Each concept will include comprehensive consideration of a variety of interesting case studies. Students will be challenged to apply this knowledge in a variety of scenarios (e.g., research, management, policy making, regulatory compliance) and fields (i.e., education, conservation, resource management, agriculture, law, real estate development, urban planning). The course will conclude with discussion of controversies surrounding biological invasions and prospects for the future of invasions, considering, e.g., biotic homogenization, animal rights, human activity, climate change, and management with new technologies.

Student Projects: Through observation and experimentation, students will consider how ecological interactions influence the impacts of introduced species. Each student will follow a local invasive species, performing field observations and a literature review to describe its taxonomy, distribution, natural history, interactions, and impacts. Students will develop factsheets that include mini-studies focusing on the interactions and impacts of their species. Students will also address the introduction and trajectory of their species alongside course content, sharing what they learned and serving collectively as information sources for comparative considerations, e.g., of spread and establishment, interactions and impacts, regulatory applications and outcomes, etc.

Photo: Achim Wehrmann

Learning Goals: (1) understand, with the benefit of hands-on experience, concepts of invasion biology; (2) read, critique, and synthesize literature; (3) use research methods and tools to develop and conduct a research project; (4) organize information in a focused and clearly written factsheet; and (5) think critically about current hypotheses and societal environmental issues related to invasion biology.

Course material will come from required and supplemental texts and refereed journals, gray literature (e.g., policy documents), and popular media.

Required text:
Invasive Species: What Everyone Needs to Know by Daniel Simberloff. 2013. Published by Oxford University Press, Oxford. 329 pages. ISBN: 978-0-19-99201-7 (hardback) or 978-0-19-99203-1 (paperback)

Suggested Supplemental Text (several copies will be provided for use in class):
Encyclopedia of Biological Invasions, edited by Daniel Simberloff and Marcel Rejmánek, University of California Press, 2011, 765 pages. ISBN: 978-0-520-26421-2

Enrollment limited to 15 students.


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Estimated 2017 Costs

Student Information 2017



Evolutionary Quantitative Genetics Workshop

Non-credit workshop.
Participants arrive at Friday Harbor Labs on Sunday, June 4, lectures and exercises occur June 5-9, and participants depart on Saturday, June 10, 2017.

Application deadline March 1, 2017.
Application forms and details here:
http://tinyurl.com/EQG2017

Instructors:

Dr. Joe Felsenstein
Department of Genome Sciences
University of Washington, Seattle
joe@gs.washington.edu


Dr. Stevan J. Arnold
Department of Integrative Biology
Oregon State University, Corvallis
stevan.arnold@oregonstate.edu

Previous versions of this 5-day workshop were given at National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent) at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina from 2011-2013, and then at the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville from 2014-2016. Like past versions, the Friday Harbor version will review the basics of theory in the field of evolutionary quantitative genetics and its connections to evolution observed at various time scales. The aim of the workshop is to build a bridge between the traditionally separate disciplines of quantitative genetics and comparative methods.

Quantitative genetic theory for natural populations was developed considerably in the period from 1970 to 1990 and up to the present, and it has been applied to a wide range of phenomena including the evolution of differences between the sexes, sexual preferences, life history traits, plasticity of traits, as well as the evolution of body size and other morphological measurements. Textbooks have not kept pace with these developments, and currently few universities offer courses in this subject aimed at evolutionary biologists. Evolutionary biologists need to understand this field because of the ability to collect large amounts of data by computer, the development of statistical methods for changes of traits on evolutionary trees and for changes in a single species through time, and the realization that quantitative characters will not soon be fully explained by genomics. This workshop aims to fill this need by reviewing basic aspects of theory and illustrating how that theory can be tested with data, both from single species and with multiple-species phylogenies. Participants will use R, an open-source statistical programming language, to build and test evolutionary models.

The workshop involves lectures and in-class computer exercises (consult the 2016 tutorial website for examples). The intended participants for this workshop are graduate students, post-docs, and junior faculty members in evolutionary biology. The workshop can accommodate up to 35 participants. Guest instructors will include:

Marguerite Butler, Biology, Univ. Hawai'i, Mānoa
Patrick Carter, Evolutionary Physiology, Washington State University, Pullman
Adam Jones, Biology, Texas A&M University, College Station
Brian O'Meara, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville
Josef Uyeda, Biological Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg

Cost: $1000 to be paid to Friday Harbor Laboratories. This fee will cover housing and meals at FHL and all other workshop expenses, except travel. Participants who have been admitted to attend will make their payment prior to arrival at FHL. Details of payment by credit card or check will be provided once the applicant has been admitted to attend.

This workshop is sponsored by The American Society of Naturalists and the Society for the Study of Evolution.  Student members of ASN are eligible for a $200 discount onthe workshop fee.  FHL will offer this discount to a maximum of 13 participants, first-come, first-serve, based on the date the workshop application is submitted. Apply for an ASF application is submitted.  Apply for an ASN student membership ($20/yr) at http://www.amnat.org/home.html



Summer 2017 Workshop on the Dynamic Brain

NON-CREDIT WORKSHOP

Co-hosted by the Allen Institute for Brain Science and the Computational Neuroscience Program at the University of Washington and directed by Drs. Christof Koch and Adrienne Fairhall.

August 20 - September 3, 2017
Application deadline: April 1, 2017

This workshop is being held on the FHL campus but current information and the application process is being managed through this website: http://courses.washington.edu/braindyn

Questions? Please contact: dynamicbrain at alleninstitute.org

 


Independent Study for UW Graduate Students

During all quarters, graduate students may register for research with the consent of their faculty advisors.

600 Independent Study or Research
700 Master's Thesis
800 Doctoral Dissertation