SummaryDiagrm_20121123_2

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Figure 1. A schematic model of the antennal movements and their roles during flight. Visual system detects visual motion and activates both antennal and wing motor system to move the antennae and the wings. Red dotted lines show the positions of the antennae and the wings after the response to rightward visual motion. ‘S’, ‘P’, and ‘F’ stand for the scape, the pedicel, and the funiculus of the antenna. The response brings the wing and the antenna closer on the left side, and increases the movement of the PF joint through wing induced airflow. Mechanosensory neurons detect this increase and activate wing motor system to further reduce the wing stroke amplitude on the right side (green line) and enhance the visually-induced turn.

Figure 1. A schematic model of the antennal movements and their roles during flight. Visual system detects visual motion and activates both antennal and wing motor system to move the antennae and the wings. Red dotted lines show the positions of the antennae and the wings after the response to rightward visual motion. ‘S’, ‘P’, and ‘F’ stand for the scape, the pedicel, and the funiculus of the antenna. The response brings the wing and the antenna closer on the left side, and increases the movement of the PF joint through wing induced airflow. Mechanosensory neurons detect this increase and activate wing motor system to further reduce the wing stroke amplitude on the right side (green line) and enhance the visually-induced turn.