Category Archives: Undergraduate

Sell it, win it

UW undergrads Hayden Krall, Hannah Hanson, Hanna Klemm, and Megan Smith beat out 20 other schools and won the 2012 “Can’t Beat the Experience” National Team Selling Competition at the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University.

Guest post by Megan Smith, UW undergrad and Sales Certificate student

National Team Selling CompetitionWe received the case approximately two weeks before the competition. The case was an internal sale and we were a “special task team” of employees that needed to make a presentation to our company’s CEO and VP of Human Resources. Our company was a research firm called “Abaci.” As the special task team, we were charged with creating a Workplace Wellness Program that introduced a new fitness device: the GetFit wristband.

The two weeks leading up to the competition were filled with preparation, devising plans, and a lot of coaching. We had fantastic support from our coaches and advisers: Jack Rhodes, Jeff Lehman, Joe Vandahey and last year’s NTSC team (Eric Hotaling, Dorine Rassaian, Julie Reynolds, and Neil Carter).

The competition day was split into two presentations: a morning session for needs analysis (15 min) and an afternoon sales presentation (20 min). The need analysis was a meeting with the VP of HR, “Casey” whom we were able to talk to about the issues facing the company, the data we were given, and uncover any other information that wasn’t included in the case description. Discovering all of the company’s needs was vital for success in the afternoon presentation. In the three hours between our morning session and afternoon presentation, we modified our presentation to incorporate the needs uncovered in the morning session and fit in as much practice as we could. We presented our Wellness Program to the company CEO, “Doug,” and our VP of HR, Casey. We addressed all their questions and received approval to implement the program.

Winning was surreal. There are not words to describe the feeling of having many late nights and hours of practice pay off. It is impossible for us to give enough credit to our coaches for their unparalleled support and guidance. Their support in combination with how well our team was able to work together made it possible for us to create a comprehensive and creative Wellness Plan that pulled us through to win. The amount we learned and the enjoyment and excitement of the competition truly made the experience unbeatable. Watch the morning and afternoon sessions.

The Sales Certificate Program at the Foster School provides students with the knowledge and real-world experience necessary to be successful in sales.

Study abroad photo contest winners 2012

Over 250 University of Washington Foster School of Business undergraduate and MBA students studied or interned abroad last year. These photos and short descriptions are a small taste of the transformative educational experiences these students have each year. The UW Global Business Center held a competition for the best student photos in two categories: 1) Foster Abroad: Photo that inspires others to study abroad or makes a statement about the student experience abroad; 2) My Global Lens: Views uniquely accessible to students living abroad – social issues, cultural interactions, cityscapes, landscapes, etc.

Here are the first and second place winners in each category. Enjoy them!

1st Place Foster Abroad: Chris Comley, Undergraduate; Montpellier, France

Bon Appetit, Au Revoir
Friends dining at an enchanting garden cafe, enjoying a final lunch of quiche, iced tea, and peaches and cream before the magic of a summer in the Midi ends

Experience abroad: Summer in the south of France afforded many luxuriant opportunities. Among the best were afternoons spent dining in this tiny garden area tucked discreetly behind an antiques shop where good food and company created moments to savor. The photos captures the ironic laughter of our final lunch at the cafe, a day before the end of the program.

2nd Place Foster Abroad: Ashley Matsumoto, Undergraduate; Kobe, Japan

Becoming Japanese
During summer in Japan, Yukata (summer version of kimono) is the Japanese traditional-wear for festivals and other events, but my fellow Foster friend and I decided one day near the end of our semester that we wanted to just explore the beauty of Kyoto and make memories together. We had hundreds of photos taken of us and are probably now in those tourists’ photo albums, who were shocked when we spoke to them in English – though we had been speaking the language the entire time there, this day in look we also finally became “Japanese.”

Experience abroad: Studying abroad was the most exciting, amazing, memorable experience of my life. Time became something I thought about every day. At home, most of my time was devoted to school, commute, family, friends, etc. But in Kobe, I was starting completely fresh with no established routine – and it was almost like time was something I now had complete control over, and /I/ could decide how I wanted to use it. My choice was to focus on everything happening in the here and now, so that I would never regret not doing something during these 6 months that I knew I would forever pine for but never get back no matter how many times I return to Japan. And when I look at my thousands of photos and think on the memories with the amazing friends I was able to make, I am happy to say that I regret nothing. And, I am heading back to Japan as soon as absolutely possible!

1st Place My Global Lens: Roda Barket, Undergraduate; Longji, China

Craving Fresh Air
Figuratively, craving the freshness and uniqueness of China. Literally, craving the fresh air in Longji after experiencing the pollution in Beijing and Shanghai.

Experience abroad: I had the most incredible experience of my life. Being an African immigrant young woman, I never thought I would have the opportunity to go to such an “exotic” country as China. I use the word “exotic” because I’m often referred to as exotic by Americans but never quite understood it until China. I never had the chance to go to a place or learn about a culture that was so unfamiliar to me. I had no idea what to expect. I loved every minute of my experience, it was life transforming for me and inspiring to many of the people I knew who also considered China exotic.
2nd Place My Global Lens: Alex Birch, Undergraduate; Pingyao, China

A Land That Time Has Forgotten
To describe urban and rural China as “180 degrees” from each other, would be an understatement. As much as we think of the progression made today, the rest of the world is still trying to catch up.

Experience abroad: I was able to explore many different areas in Asia while studying abroad in Shanghai. My program took me to the ancient city of Pingyao, the first city to have China’s first national bank. Here, I was able to witness rural China, something that I could never have imagined prior to arriving to the city. It truly made me realize that this is how a significant portion of the world still lives. Over my 3 months, I was able to experience the extreme ends of Chinese culture, the most modern and most dated, something I will never forget and always will cherish.

See all photos submitted for the contest. Judges included over 30 faculty and staff members. Learn more about MBA and undergraduate study abroad opportunities at the Foster School.

Foster team wins national KPMG ALPFA Competition

Foster Team Wins National KPMG ALPFA Competition On August 13 and 14 in Las Vegas, an undergraduate accounting team from the UW Foster School of Business won the Association of Latino Professionals in Finance & Accounting (ALPFA) national case competition.

Sponsored by KPMG, the invitation only competition selects teams from 24 schools around the country to analyze specific public companies and present on key accounting policies, strategies and risks, and provide recommendations to help mitigate the firms’ risks.

The Foster team analyzed Tyson Foods, a public company headquartered in Arkansas. They worked throughout spring quarter analyzing and researching Tyson’s financial position. Foster’s team consisted of seniors Sonia Gorski and Ana Mendez and juniors Anthony Escobar and Gideon Vasquez.

“Our Foster team gave an extremely impressive presentation to the mock audit committee from KPMG,” says faculty adviser Patricia Angell, who coached the students. “Any firm would be honored to be represented by these polished professionals.”

The team was also supported by the local ALPFA chapter and KPMG managers Mark Turley and Lakshmi Kuduganti.

Foster entrepreneurs bring “Swagga” to Husky nation

It’s official. Onesies are not just for babies anymore. 

Undergraduate students at the University of Washington Foster School of Business have invented—and are pre-selling—the “Swagga Suit,” a purple one-piece jumpsuit with a giant gold “W” across the chest… for grown-ups.

Foster’s entrepreneur student-founder Gillian Pennington (BA 2012) says, “We have gotten a lot of interest from UW alumni and have recently gotten more attention after being tweeted about by Jon Brockman.”

The adult onesie’s creation story: Earlier this year, a group of Foster students, led by Pennington, formed a company called SWAG (Sweet Washington Athletic Gear). They’re goal was to offer a different spin on sports fan apparel. According to the SWAG website: “After sitting in a locked room for a total of 13.5 hours we not only became good friends but we decided to produce jumpsuits… The sequence of events behind this decision is a little blurred but let’s just say things got weird and in the end here we are and here is our awesome product… The Original Swagga Suit!”

Will this bizarre unique fashion innovation sweep the world?

Seattle P-I has certainly noticed. So has Yahoo! Sports, NBC Sports, SB Nation, BuzzFeed and more other incredulous news outlets by the minute. (Doesn’t hurt that former UW basketball star Jon Brockman—now a Milwaukee Buck—was game enough to model the Swagga Suit in full flight).

Move over Snuggie. Huskies are bringing the Swagga!

Making a difference

The Nutters, Lee and Darlene (UW BA alumni, 1967), have close ties to the Northwest and the University of Washington. Both graduated from the UW School of Business (now Foster) in 1967, and there are now three more Huskies in their immediate family. Lee also serves as a member of the Foster School Advisory Board.

“We wanted to give something back to this school and the people of this state that afforded us an education and, in doing so, led to the many opportunities we‘ve enjoyed,” Lee explained.

Born in Astoria, Oregon, Lee grew up in small towns in Western Oregon and Washington, where his father worked in the lumber business. He finished the eighth grade in a class of eight in a two-room schoolhouse and graduated from Clallam Bay High School with a class of sixteen. “It was a big change going from those small communities to the University of Washington and Seattle,” Lee said with a smile. He studied accounting and operations at the business school.  Darlene graduated with a degree in marketing.

Two days after graduation, Lee began his forty-year career as an analyst with Rayonier, a global supplier of high performance cellulose fiber and wood products. He retired in 2007, as Chairman, President and CEO. Darlene grew up in Cathlamet, WA, and initially attended WSU to study business, but finished at the University of Washington. Lee said, “She saw the light.”

Although Lee and Darlene married while in Seattle, his career eventually took them and their two children, to the East Coast and ultimately Florida. However, the Northwest and UW still hold a very special place in their hearts and lives and they often return to visit family and friends. The Nutters are also passionate about Husky athletics, managing to attend a few UW basketball and most football games.

Their giving relationship with the University of Washington started modestly and grew over decades. “I found our first check to the UW for $25!” Darlene laughed. More recently, Lee and Darlene have provided significant support to the Foster School of Business for undergraduate scholarships, MBA scholarships and a named team room in PACCAR Hall.

“We paid far less than the cost of our education and its value. The citizens of the state of Washington paid the balance…” Lee continued. “We feel obliged and honored to give back.” He and Darlene hope to inspire other Foster alumni to support scholarships that help future students achieve something that they could not have done otherwise.

“We hear from students who have received scholarships about what it meant to them, what they’re accomplishing and what they hope to achieve,” Darlene described. “It’s very satisfying to know that you have been able to make a difference.”

Foster students win 2012 international marketing case competition

On March 3, 2012, an undergraduate case competition team from the University of Washington Foster School of Business won the Intercollegiate Marketing Competition held at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, Canada. Eight teams were tasked with developing a marketing plan for Zajak Ranch, a non-profit summer camp for disabled children.

Looking to become financially self-sustaining while attracting the next generation of donors and corporate sponsors, the camp had asked students to find ways to increase revenues during the winter months while also signing reoccurring monthly donors in the younger demographic. Teams were given only three hours to deliberate, design a full presentation and practice before immediately giving a 20-minute presentation with 15 minutes of Q&A. Only four teams would then move on to the final round where they would present in front of a panel of judges consisting of marketing professionals, members of the camp’s management, as well as the managing member of the Zajak family.

Foster’s team consisted of Allen Kuceba, Alex Diaz and Caitlin Snaring, all members of the American Marketing Association student organization. Kuceba is a senior with a focus in finance and entrepreneurship, Diaz is a senior focused on marketing and communications and Snaring is a junior focused on marketing and accounting. The three were selected from a pool of applicants from the UW American Marketing Association.

“I am extremely proud of this team. They worked hard practicing case analysis and presentation skills. With only three hours to prepare, they demonstrated the ability to critically analyze a business problem and develop a viable solution,” says faculty advisor Leta Beard, who coached the students.

Keeping it real

Simulated businesses with make-believe P&L statements have no place in Professor John Castle’s “Creating a Company” course at the UW Foster Business School. Here, student businesses are awarded real money and expected to turn a profit in 10 weeks. There’s no text book or PowerPoint lectures. The emphasis is on relentless question and answer, to promote “on your feet” thinking—a necessity for young entrepreneurs.

That’s how Castle likes it. Over the duration of the two-quarter sequence, student teams write a business plan, meet with investors to obtain in-house funding, run the business and then exit the firm at the end of the second quarter. All profits are returned to the fund, which has become self-sustaining over time. Though profitability of the company is a major criterion for grading, the ability of the team to deal with the unexpected is considered more important.

The next Google is not a hoped-for endpoint of this entrepreneurship course, but personal enlightenment and growth certainly is. Castle tells students, “You may or may not learn to be a good entrepreneur here, but you will find out whether you want to be one.” Students learn by starting companies that, among other ideas, sell clothing, promote music events or serve a real and immediate need, as in the case of the MS Children’s Book.

The book was the inspiration of William Khazaal, father of two, who returned to the UW Foster School for his BA at age 33. In 2009 Khazaal was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS). Those with this devastating disease have good days and days when their energy is sapped. On bad days, Khazaal’s kids would be scared and confused, with no resources to help them understand what was happening with their dad. Like any good entrepreneur, Khazaal created one. His team, which included Molly Massena, Zac Raasch, Eugene Kim and Adam Greenberg, produced, printed and sold and donated more than 2,000 copies of MS Children’s Book, a 50-page picture book. The team also generated $12,000—the largest profit in class history.

While Khazaal’s story is uncommon, the take-home message of the course was. “My experience demonstrated the value of working as a team and letting my team members take more of the initiative. I learned how to plan events to get the results I wanted, rather than just jumping into things,” Khazaal reflected.

The book is only the beginning of the story. Khazaal plans to continue the effort past his graduation this fall, with more events to raise money for MS awareness and research.

Study abroad photo contest winners 2011

A picture is worth a thousand words. Every year University of Washington Foster School of Business undergraduate and MBA students study and work abroad as part of their business degree and sometimes the best way to convey the value of those experience is through a photo. The UW Global Business Center held a competition for the best student photos of 2011 travels. Here are the 1st and 2nd place winners in two categories – titles, captions, descriptions written by students:

  1. Foster Abroad: Photo that inspires others to study abroad or makes a statement about the student experience abroad
  2. My Global Lens: Views uniquely accessible to students living abroad – social issues, cultural interactions, city scapes, landscapes, etc.

Foster Abroad – 1st Place (tie): Olivia Arguinchona, undergraduate 
India

Good morning India!
This picture was taken at the Taj Mahal at around 6 AM in the morning. I don’t think there is any other place where I could have been so awake at this hour in the morning.

Experience abroad: This exploration seminar focused on women leadership and entrepreneurship in a country where women are commonly oppressed. Looking back on all I experienced, India has become a symbol of resilience for me. I met so many women who had found a way to lift themselves and their family out of desperate poverty, or who were, in poverty, surviving and planning for the future of their children. Our group delved into the topic of microfinance, something I know hope to pursue once receiving a degree.

Foster Abroad – 1st Place (tie): Olga Kachook, undergraduate
Johannesburg, South Africa

Shadows of Us
Biking through Soweto, one of South Africa’s most culturally rich and diverse townships.

Experience abroad: Life abroad beats to a different drum- restaurants serve food at a snail’s pace, transportation is a chaotic adventure, and many things are lost in translation. Sometimes these changes were exhilarating, and sometimes they were frustrating, but most of the time they just made you stop and question things you take at face value back home. The differences between places and cultures are what usually stand out, but ultimately studying abroad shows you both sides of the coin- not just differences but similarities too. Discovering our similarities to people half way across the world is what makes travel exciting.

Foster Abroad – 2nd Place: Stephan Chung, undergraduate
Cork, Ireland

Reppin’ the DUBYA after win #1
The first of many. UW’s Ireland Exploration Seminar representing the dawg pack in Ireland following our season opening win against the Eastern Eagles. Photo location: Kinsale Harbour

Experience abroad: I decided to go on this business summer exploration to Ireland after hearing raving reviews from everyone I ever talked to who went on the trip. We spent an amazing three weeks visiting large national business and touring Ireland’s cities, towns, and beautiful natural landscape. The Charles’ Fort at Kinsale Harbour where this picture was taken offered breathtaking views of the coast and an interesting piece of Irish history.

My Global Lens – 1st Place: Amanda Hamilton, undergraduate
Ahmedabad, India

Who Runs the World? (Girls)
Empowering a girl empowers the world. Providing education and opportunities to girls around the world is the key to the future. Location: A small, rural village outside Ahmedabad

Experience abroad: Traveling to India was the biggest eye-opener ever. The culture shock and awe-inspiring experience was, at times, overwhelming, but left me thinking so much more deeply about the issues going on in this world. Seeing the stark contrast between the rich and poor and meeting all these amazing women who are taking what they were given and being empowered to be the change in their own lives and communities is so entirely humbling and inspiring. It was amazing to see the people and programs who are truly trying to make a difference by empowering these women and giving them opportunities to affect change around them. The woman in this picture was part of a case study where we went and met with a group of women in a village who had been given solar lanterns and clean cookstoves to improve their lives and daily work.

My Global Lens – 2nd Place: Siena Cairns, undergraduate
Valdivia, Chile

Trapped Miners: 33+
Crawling deep into the suffocating tunnels of Cerro de Potosí showed me there were more than 33 miners living in the dark. Location of photo: Potosí, Bolivia

Experience abroad: The week I arrived in Chile was the week that 33 miners became trapped in the north. Although this was significant international news, it was hardly the only cause for attention across the nation. At that same time, leaders of the indigenous minority, the Mapuche, were entering their second month of a hunger strike and protesters were gathering blocks away from my university. In the midst of national turmoil, Chile was approaching its 200 year celebration as a nation and an election year. I was swept into all of this, and slowly over meals with my host family, classroom discussions, and chats with local friends, my understanding of Chile’s political, social, and cultural history grew until I really began to understand the weight of these pressing issues around me.

Touring the mines and engaging with miners was one of these eye opening experiences. The miners taught me how life in the mines is so demanding that there comes a day when you know little else. In this sense, they become trapped in those deadly tunnels, unable to leave the only lifestyle they know. When I left home to learn Spanish, I never expected to return with such an understanding of this foreign culture too.

See all photos submitted for the contest. Judges included nearly 30 faculty and staff members. Learn more about MBA and undergraduate study and work abroad opportunities via the Global Business Center.

Friends + baseball tickets = an epic idea

Scott Barrows and James Kimmel, co-founders of Epic Seats.
Scott Barrows and James Kimmel, co-founders of Epic Seats.

If you’re dying to go to the sold-out Lady Gaga concert or get a seat on the 50-yard line at the Super Bowl, a Seattle start-up has your back. Epic Seats helps clients buy and sell tickets to all major concert, sporting and theater events throughout North America, and specializes in hard to find tickets, premium locations and sold out events. But what’s more epic than the seats is the company’s commitment to providing exceptional service.

While living in Chicago, Scott Barrows (BA 2000) maintained his Cubs habit by buying extra game tickets and reselling them on eBay. As luck would have it, his longtime friend and fellow CIE alum James Kimmel (MBA 2005) was doing the same thing with Mariners tickets in Seattle. The two decided to pool their assets—two $10,000 credit cards—and started Epic Seats together in 2003. Two years later they competed in the UW Business Plan Competition, making it to the Sweet 16. In a marketplace that included hundreds of other companies selling the same product, Barrows and Kimmel knew they’d need to differentiate themselves early on and focus on their core competencies: customer service and innovation.

“Our number one goal has always been to be the most customer-centric company in our industry,” says Barrows. “Many companies choose profits over clients, and we’ll always do the opposite.” Kimmel echoes that sentiment. “Any brand equity we have as an organization is directly attributable to our customer base and what they say about us to their friends and associates. For seven years we have relied on referrals and positive word of mouth as our primary form of marketing,” says Kimmel. One need only do a quick search for Epic Seats online to see their strategy is working; customer after customer raves about what great customer service they’ve received.

Case in point: about a year after going into business, Epic Seats purchased 16 ticket packages through a travel company for the BCS title game between the Texas Longhorns and USC Trojans and resold 12 of them for a nice profit, holding on to four for themselves and a couple of friends. When they arrived at the hotel, they found the travel company had oversold the packages and was cancelling them, simply telling people they’d refund their purchase price. Rather than do the same to their clients who had brought their families to Pasadena for the game, Barrows and Kimmel scrambled to find new hotel rooms and plenty of tickets so their clients could all go to the game. “We ended up losing $20,000 and had to stay in a dumpy motel and watch the game at Hooters, but we just decided that was going to be who we are,” says Barrows.

Epic Seat’s other core value is to always be innovating and with two life-long entrepreneurs at the helm, it’s easy to see where that comes from. In recent years, the company expanded to include Epic Inventory Management, providing back-end operations—everything from customer service to order processing and shipping—to small and medium-sized ticket brokerages around the country. Epic is also gearing up to launch TicketsThatGive in June, a new venture that will allow charities and foundations to raise money via a promotional code for any ticket sales generated by their constituents.

Kimmel’s advice for young entrepreneurs is to “follow your passion and if you can make a living doing what you love, it’s well worth the risk of striking out on your own.” Barrows echoes that point, adding that entrepreneurs shouldn’t be afraid to fail. “I’ve had probably 11 start-ups, and this is the first one that’s been successful. I just knew that if I kept at it, eventually I’d be successful.”