Category Archives: Undergraduate

Sailing through the competition

Guest post by Ashley Bozeman, Senior, studying International Business & Marketing

Last week Holland America Line Global Case Competition competitors had the opportunity to attend a pre-competition workshop with Leta Beard, Lecturer of Marketing and International Business. Professor Beard has had years of experience coaching and guiding numerous case competition teams to victory all over the world. She had great insight for our brand-new freshmen competitors and senior veterans alike! Here are our “Top Ten Tips” we took away from the workshop—enjoy!

  1. Don’t panic when you get the case, you don’t need to know EVERYTHING, just focus on what’s important.
  2. Set a timeline for your 48-hour preparation. What do you want to have accomplished by what hour?
  3. Run through your presentation BEFORE submitting your slide deck. You will probably catch some things you want to change while you practice.
  4. Don’t memorize. It’s important to be comfortable with your talking points, but if you memorize you could get tripped up if something unexpected happens.
  5. Watch your pace: if it feels like you’re talking too slow, it’s probably just right.
  6. Leave 30 seconds at the end of your presentation when you practice. You don’t want to go over the time limit, and never know when those extra seconds might come in handy.
  7. “Tell us” three times. “Tell us what you’re going to tell us, then tell us, then tell us what you told us.” It’s important to have a clear direction and it never hurts to repeat key points.
  8. Stay “in character”. The team and the judges will each have a role—know these roles and address the judges and your teammates as their respective characters.
  9. Avoid jargon. The judges may not be familiar with acronyms and terms that you’ve learned in class so be sure to explain things like “SWOT” “NPV” and the “4 P’s”.
  10.  Have fun and Smile!!

Case CompCompetitors have been working hard preparing for the competition this week. Teams will receive their case on Wednesday, November 13th and present their ideas to judges on Saturday, November 16th. The top four teams will advance to the final round to compete for a chance at the championship title and $1000 cash prize. The top scoring “Freshman Direct Track” team will also be revealed at the reception following the final round. Best of luck to all of our competitors this week! Curious about the competition? Volunteer on Saturday to help make sure it runs smoothly! Email if you’re interested.

The final round presentations are open to the public so come by and watch their creative minds at work Saturday, November 16th at 2 pm in Anthony’s Forum, Dempsey Hall!

Feet in Doors

EY stakeholders
EY partners, key alumni, Foster school leadership, faculty and staff celebrating EY’s naming gift for the EY Center for Undergraduate Career Advancement.

EY Center has quickly become an essential new resource for students entering the job market

Consider the EY Center for Undergraduate Career Advancement’s impact on students, by the numbers.

Last academic year, the center presented a job fair featuring 125+ hiring companies, held 1,400 advising appointments, coordinated 330 interview sessions with employers, and facilitated more than 1,700 job interviews for students. At press date, the EY Center helped over 430 graduating seniors land a job with companies that include Accenture, Chevron and Wells Fargo.

Remarkable figures, considering the center was launched only a year ago.

The EY Center has also introduced Industry Focus Nights, which give students the opportunity to learn more about careers in industries such as finance, consulting and IT, and launched the Career Exploration Program for newly admitted Foster students. The center also is connecting students to career opportunities outside of Seattle. In August, students traveled to San Francisco to meet with six Bay Area firms and participate in a networking event with employers and Foster alumni.

According to Andy Rabitoy, director of the EY Center, goals for the upcoming year include connecting with more alumni, focusing on career opportunities for women and minorities, and increasing interview preparations—especially for case interviews which ask students to solve a business problem during an interview. Additionally, the center will be offering a marketing symposium, holding Excel modeling workshops and partnering with the Foster Consulting and Business Development Center to offer a course on consulting. Many jobs today require advanced analytical skills, and the center is focused on helping students acquire skills that allow them to hit to the ground running in their first job.

Rabitoy is enthusiastic about what the center has accomplished in its first year, and promises much more to come. “I can’t imagine not doing this,” he says. “We’re working with students at a defining moment in their life. I feel excited and proud when I see students get the job they want.”

All in

Barry SchulmanBarry Shulman brings his “A” game to business, poker and life

Barry Shulman (BA 1967) is not a professional poker player.

Sure, he has a pair of championship bracelets from the World Series of Poker, 16 tournament titles, and 119 finishes in the cash—adding up to winnings in excess of $4.7 million. And he’s authored five books and a video on the game’s intricacies.

But it’s not how he makes his living. “People think I just played poker all my life,” says Shulman, whose inscrutable granite scowl at the card table is straight out of Central Casting. “That’s never how I paid my rent. My whole life I’ve worked, worked, worked.”

After graduating with a degree in accounting from the Foster School, Shulman started in his father’s wholesale liquor business.

Real money

But Shulman had his own ambitions. He began selling non-traditional securities in oil and gas and real estate—“anything that wasn’t stocks and bonds,” he says.

Throughout the 1980s his expertise in real estate was quoted in the New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Businessweek, Fortune, Barrons and a host of other media.

He also developed real estate of his own. In the ’80s and early ’90s, Shulman bought, developed, managed and sold condominiums in 19 Northwest communities, usually with a trusted group of investors. The deals were conservative, and lined up before seeking capital. And he always had skin in the game.

“I never did deals that I didn’t have a big investment in,” Shulman says. “I wasn’t just making money by raising money. If it was going to make money for me, it had to make money for the other guys, too.

“No investor in any of my deals ever lost a penny.”

What happened in Vegas

Having accumulated a tidy nest egg—and zero debt—by the early 1990s, Shulman decided to retire to Las Vegas, travel a bit, and maybe play a little poker, a hobby back in his college days.

Retirement didn’t suit him, intellectually. But poker did. He studied the game voraciously. And he began winning money in progressively bigger tournaments.

Shulman couldn’t help but notice that interest in the game was exploding. The venues had gone upscale, a long way from the game’s smoky backroom past. There were more and bigger-money tournaments. And they were on TV. Plus, the Internet was just about to break.

“It was crystal clear to me to me that poker was going to boom,” Shulman says. “And I wanted to get in on the business.”

Ruling out a casino, he instead purchased Card Player Media with his retirement funds. With Shulman as publisher and son Jeff as president, Card Player has become a major force in the industry. Shulman & son are as responsible as anyone for poker’s continuing ascent.

The sweet life

At 67, Shulman remains the right kind of busy for one averse to retirement. He travels the world by cruise ship with his wife Allyn, and blogs about his experiences at JetSetWay.com. He’s the CEO of the Shulman Family Foundation, and keeps a hand in the real estate business with a few low-risk commercial properties.

He leads Card Player and plays a lot of cards, a hobbyist of the highest order. This makes Shulman patriarch of the “First Family of Poker”—Allyn is a champion in her own right (with more than $1 million in winnings) and Jeff is one of only three people this century to make the final table at two World Series of Pokers (2001 and 2009).

Reflecting on a still-vibrant career, Shulman believes that success in business and in poker comes from the same place.

“In business,” he says, “if you do the right things at the right times in the right places and with the right people, sometimes you get lucky. I’ve never won a poker tournament without getting lucky. I’ve also never won one where I wasn’t playing my best game. The two go together.”

Power of a game plan

Recently, Foster School students had the opportunity to hear from Steve Forbes and Rich Karlgaard, two of the powerhouses behind Forbes magazine. The topic of the talk was “The Power of a Game Plan.” It was an opportunity for students to ask Forbes and Karlgaard about the international and domestic business outlook and how they (students) can plan for the future.

Steve Forbes is chairman and editor-in-chief of Forbes Media. He has also authored several books; his most recent one is titled: Freedom Manifesto – Why Free Markets are Moral and Big Government Isn’t. He holds a BA in history from Princeton University.

Rich Karlgaard is the publisher of Forbes magazine and writes a biweekly column called Innovation Rules. He’s also an entrepreneur, an active angel investor, and sits on three outside boards. He’s also co-winner of the Ernst & Young Northern California Entrepreneur of the Year Award. He holds a BA from Stanford University.

Highlights from the talk included advice from Karlgaard that to be successful in business, you should know your strengths and then find people with complementary skills. Forbes also told the audience of mostly undergraduates to be prepared to feel adrift and lost for awhile when you first start working after college. It will be the first time your life won’t be structured by school.

Watch the entire talk.

The Power of a Game Plan from the Foster School of Business.

San Francisco Trek

San Francisco Trek 2013

Foster Undergraduate Career Services team understands the importance of giving our students opportunities to engage with employers outside of the Seattle area. With that said, we are happy to report that Foster Undergraduate Career Services had the opportunity to take a group of Foster students to San Francisco to visit five companies. This group of Foster students consisted of finance/accounting majors who are interested in working in the bay area after they graduate. Each visit entailed an overview of the company, in-addition to students getting the opportunity to network with company representatives. During this two-day trek we also had a San Francisco alumni networking night, where we had roughly 40 Foster alumni from the San Francisco area meet up to network with each other as well as our current students.

When we asked some of the students who attended this trek what they liked best about it, here is what they had to say:

“I loved the networking night at Thirsty Bear. It was beyond helpful to socialize and talk with all the alumni. They were beyond helpful and interested in answering all of our questions.”

“I met several great companies that are on my target company list. These companies let their partners, managers and seniors share their work experience. That is very helpful to me. I knew more about these companies and got in touch with people there.”

“Going to the companies and learning about what is out there was definitely the most valuable part of the trip for me. In addition to and along with that, getting the chance to connect and meet with professionals in the field, particularly the UW grads, was great.”

The companies that we had the opportunity to visit on that two-day trek were: