Why a career in consulting is for me

Megan Sevigny (BA 2015) reflects on her experience as a summer student consultant with the UW Consulting & Business Development Center.

At the beginning of this summer I had a small panic attack, which I am told is fairly common among incoming college seniors: I was certain I was making all the wrong life choices, and that I would be floundering helplessly after graduation. Fortunately, I didn’t have much time to wallow in my panic because I almost immediately started as a summer student consultant with the Consulting & Business Development Center. Luckily for me, my internship was the perfect tranquilizer for my panic attack because it led me to realize that not only do I want to pursue a career in consulting after college graduation, but I am being well prepared to pursue that goal with confidence.

Megan Sevigny
Student consultant Megan Sevigny (BA 2015) with Justin Christensen from RE Powell after presenting her final recommendations to the company.

In June, I contracted with a convenience store chain, an athletic club, and a distillery all from the lower Yakima Valley and the Tri-Cities to perform consulting projects through the center. My clients could not have been more different, but this diversity was what made my work so exciting, educational, and enriching. I grew up in the Yakima Valley and it was especially meaningful to me to work so close to home and to see local business owners bringing their ideas and passion for what they do to the community.

I can’t even begin to explain everything I learned about financial statements, liquor manufacturing, survey design, and athletic club member personas this summer. My family and friends are just about done with me explaining to them the inner workings of convenience stores and no one wants to come grocery shopping with me anymore because I spend far too long examining different products and what branding techniques they use. I have also developed a habit of interrogating any small business owners I happen across, about their career stories, passions for what they do, and their current business inner workings.

However, all these side effects, while not the healthiest for my social life, have proven to me that consulting is absolutely the direction I want to head after graduation. Furthermore, working and learning in the real world have shown me many of my own strengths and weaknesses and have served as a guide for which areas I want to focus my attention in my final year at school. My time working with the center has been incredibly valuable to me in so many ways. I made wonderful connections, learned so much about myself and my capabilities, and found some amazing support through the center and the business owners I worked with. I am eager to continue to build on my education and experiences and to move forward towards a career in consulting.

PACCAR Day at Foster

A clean, modern, state-of-the-art building on the north-central part of campus, PACCAR Hall is the unmistakable jewel of the Foster School. The result of several private donations from area companies, the building is named after its largest benefactor, truck manufacturer PACCAR Inc. Headquartered in Bellevue, the Fortune 500 company continues to forge an exceptional and ongoing relationship with Foster, sponsoring the PACCAR Award for Excellence in Teaching and recruiting students and recent grads for internships and jobs. In recognition of this extraordinary partnership, Foster officially declared October 8, 2014, as PACCAR Day on the UW campus.

During the event, students, staff, and faculty were able to tour trucks, speak with PACCAR employees, and enjoy a special lunchtime presentation from CEO Ron Armstrong. See photos from the event below.

PACCAR trucks

 

 

 

PACCAR Executives

PACCAR Executives

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PACCAR Executives

 

 

 

 

PACCAR and Dean

PACCAR speaking event

 

 

 

PACCAR swag

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visit our Corporate Partner’s page to find out how your company can engage with Foster.

UW Global Business Center retains elite status as CIBER

The University of Washington’s Global Business Center is pleased to announce its selection as one of only 17 Centers for International Business Education & Research (CIBER) as designated by the U.S. Department of Education.

The CIBERs were created by Congress in 1988 to increase and promote the nation’s capacity for international understanding and competitiveness. The Global Business Center, housed at the Michael G. Foster School of Business, has been a grant recipient since 1990.  The competition this year was fierce as the pool of available grants had been reduced from 33 to just 17.

Securing the CIBER grant enhances the Global Business Center’s capacity to develop business leaders with the knowledge, skill and vision needed to collaborate and compete across the globe.  “Global Business education is critical to the future success of our students and to U.S. competitiveness,” said Dean Jiambalvo. “Creating learning opportunities that build global business expertise is a top priority of the Foster School of Business. We are grateful to the U.S. Department of Education in supporting this priority.”

The Global Business Center will leverage this grant funding to draw on the strengths of the UW in implementing thirty-six new initiatives over the next four years with a focus on: (1) understanding Asia-Pacific markets; (2) the role of supply chains in global trade and investment; and (3) experiential learning for career-readiness.

  • Some of these new initiatives include:
    Career-focused study abroad and global experiential learning opportunities for students.
  • Programs that support faculty research and teaching related to the business, economic and cultural environments of Asia.
  • Education for the business and academic communities about new Arctic trade routes.
  • Global Career Pathways Programs that prepare community college graduates for careers in international trade, supply chain management, and cybersecurity.

The four-year CIBER grant will also allow the Global Business Center to build on its core competency of delivering outstanding student programs such as MBA Global Business Study Tours, the nationally ranked undergraduate Certificate of International Studies in Business, and the Global Business Case Competition.

“This award reinforces the strengths of the Foster School’s top ranked international business specialty programs,” explains Debra Glassman, Faculty Director of the Global Business Center. “We are honored to remain a part of the national CIBER network and look forward to producing more innovative global opportunities for students, faculty and the community.”

Putting together this winning proposal and rolling out these new initiatives would not be possible without the immense support that the Global Business Center receives from numerous individuals, community and corporate partners, and the University of Washington.  Thank you to all of our supporters!

Merci * спасибо *  Gracias  * 감사드립니다 *  Danke * 謝謝 * Ngyabonga
ありがとう* Grazie * 謝謝各位 * Spasibo * σας ευχαριστώ * THANK YOU!

Checking in on YEOC: A new year

As a new school year begins, so does Foster’s high school-to-college pipeline program Young Executives of Color, known to most as YEOC. The program, now in its eighth year, is more competitive than ever, receiving over 350 applications for 173 spots. With 44 percent of current YEOC students working towards being the first in their family to attend college, the stakes are high and the rewards are life-changing. There’s much to learn and discuss, which is why the program staff kicked things off with an all morning orientation for both students and parents. YEOC Program Manager Korrie Miller believes that it’s vital that families have time to ask questions and see what their students will be doing for the next nine months. “It sets the tone for the whole year,” she says.

After breakfast and a bit of networking, students reviewed the program expectations and policies concerning attendance (required), dress code (business casual), and bullying (zero tolerance). Afterward, the students met their assigned mentors. The mentors, juniors and seniors here at Foster (some of whom are also YEOC alums) are assigned several YEOC students to support both during and outside of the sessions. This support includes contacting the mentees to see how they’re coming along with school-work (the average GPA for a YEOC student is a 3.6) and what actions they’re taking to achieve their post-secondary goals. The students ended their session with a workshop hosted by admissions counselors and recruiters from UW’s Office of Minority Affairs & Diversity.

Meanwhile at the parent session, families were given the opportunity to hear from YEOC staff, program sponsors EY, former YEOC parents, and a former YEOC student and mentor. Like the students, they also ended the session with a college prep and admissions workshop.

See photos of the orientation below.

YEOC students

 

 

 

 

YEOC students

 

 

 

 

YEOC students YEOC studenst

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

YEOC mentors
2014-2015 YEOC Mentors

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This blog post is a part of a series focusing on monthly YEOC student activities. Visit the YEOC page to learn more about the program.

A Consulting Program Grounded in Experiential Learning

Jacob Mager (BA 2015) reflects on his experience as a summer student consultant with the UW Consulting & Business Development Center.

This summer I had an amazing opportunity to work for the Consulting and Business Development Center as part of their Summer Consulting Program. I worked with three diverse businesses in the Seattle area: Plum Bistro—a vegan restaurant, McKinnon Furniture—a custom furniture manufacturer/retailer, and the CIDBIA—a non-profit dedicated to improving the business environment in Chinatown-International District. What I loved best about working with each of my clients was the true passion and excitement each owner displayed for their business. I completed a wide variety of task ranging from designing a floor plan, to orchestrating an employee meeting, to creating a branding strategy. This Program, although not my first consulting experience, challenged me to grow and learn like never before. I picked up valuable skills needed to move into a professional consulting career, and have highlighted what I consider to be some of my most important takeaways below.

Student consultant Jacob Mager (BA 2015) with Gary Strand of McKinnon Furniture after presenting his final recommendations to the company.
Student consultant Jacob Mager (BA 2015) with Gary Strand of McKinnon Furniture after presenting his final recommendations to the company.

Communication – I wrote emails, made phone calls, and presented ideas to my clients, advisors and manager. I was pushed to communicate more frequently, and because of the professional setting, more articulately than ever before. Each time I spoke clients I was expected to convey what I had completed, my plan moving forward, and to provide solid reasoning for every decision I made. This was much different than anything I’d experienced in class before, and although challenging, led me to greatly improve my verbal and written communication skills.

Relationships – I discovered the power of building close personal relationships in a professional setting. Because clients trusted me with sensitive information and were open about their concerns and goals, I was able to more efficiently address their needs and tackle additional problem areas. Ultimately, these close relationships not only made for a more enjoyable working experience, but motivated me to significantly increase both the quality and quantity of my work.

Work Ethic – As a student, it was both inspiring and empowering to get an opportunity to impact real life businesses. In doing so, I was compelled to provide thorough, quality work, and to put in the long, sometimes stressful hours needed. By being required to deliver results under deadline, just like you would in a real consulting position, I learned that long hours aren’t as hard as they seem when you feel your work has real value.

After completing this Program, I gained valuable skills and strengthened my conviction to choose a career as a consultant. I loved the diversity of my work and the opportunity to constantly learn. Each day was filled with new challenges, and knowing that my work would have a real impact kept me highly motivated. I became a better communicator, strengthened my work ethic, and learned how to build personal relationships within a professional context. I’m extremely grateful to have had this opportunity and know that it will greatly benefit me as I move forward into a career.

Wearables, Shareables, and the New Face of Healthcare: Entrepreneur Week 2014

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Presented by the Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship, Entrepreneur Week is an annual window into the world of entrepreneurship. Over the course of five days, the Buerk Center hosts events featuring Seattle’s high-profile thinkers, dreamers, innovators, and doers. Whether you’re a die-hard entrepreneur, interested in working for a start-up, or just entre-curious, this is your opportunity to meet and learn from venture capitalists, start-up CEOs, and serial entrepreneurs.
Check out EntreWeek 2014 highlights below, and visit the Buerk Center’s events calendar for details and updates.

Entrepreneur Week 2014

Monday, October 13, 2014
TA McCann
TA McCann

Your Success, Your Network: Why, How, and Now
w/T.A. McCann of Rival IQ and Gist
12:30—2pm
Dempsey Hall 302
It’s all about connections—making them, keeping them, using them. Rockstar entrepreneur T.A. McCann will open EntreWeek with a presentation on building and leveraging your network.

Couldn’t make it to this event? Check out T.A. McCann’s slides here.

 

What Are You Wearing?
5:30—7:30pm
Dempsey Hall 302
From Google Glass to Apple Watch, Fitbit to USB jewelry, everyone’s buzzing about wearables. Join a panel of experts as they discuss the ins and outs of wearable technologies and what’s next in this burgeoning market.
Panelists:
Davide Vigano, cofounder and CEO, Sensoria
Alex Day, head of business development, Peach; former project manager, RTneuro
Matthew Jordan, director of research and strategy, Artefact
Eric Jain, founder and CEO, Zenobase

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Startup Walk
11am—4pm
Fremont
Join us on a fieldtrip to meet two of Seattle’s hottest startups: Reveal and Haiku Deck.
(Students only. Registration required.)

Remaking How We Make Things
4—5:50pm
Paccar 292
Pete Agtuca and Dr. Eric Rasmussen will speak about responsible manufacturing and redesigning with sustainability in mind. What does this mean? Here’s a good example:
When most of us think of wind turbines, we think of those massive towers stretching across open spaces where wind is steady and strong. Agtuca, founder of 3 Phase Energy Systems, has re-thought wind power generation, and patented “Powersails”, which  generate energy right where it’s needed.
Speakers:
Pete Agtuca, founder of 3 Phase Energy Systems
Dr. Eric Rasmussen, Infinitum Humanitarian Systems

AmberRatcliffe_small
Amber Ratcliffe

Reinventing Healthcare
5:30—7:30pm
Dempsey Hall 302
No surprise: healthcare is undergoing a transformation. Regulatory changes, advances in technology, a more-informed consumer—all of these shifts present a new healthcare industry that is rife with opportunity. Come meet with entrepreneurs who are changing face of healthcare in surprising ways.
Panelists:
Amber Ratcliffe, Carena (formerly, co-founder of NanoString)
Aaron Coe, Calistoga Pharmaceuticals
Peter Scott, Burn Manufacturing
Leen Kawas, M3 Biotechnology

Wednesday, October 15, 2014
Venture Capital Walk 2013
Venture Capital Walk 2013

Venture Capital Walk
8:30am—1:30pm
Downtown Seattle
Visit top venture capital firms Vulcan, Maveron, and Madrona, whose portfolios include such well-known companies as Gilt, Dreamworks, eBay, Zulily, Appature, and Redfin. (Students only. Registration required.)

It’s Good to Share: The Peer-to-Peer Economy
5:30—7:30pm
Dempsey Hall 302
You can’t swing a pink Lyft mustache these days without hitting a shared economy startup. Uber, Air BnB, Poshmark—they’re everywhere, and with good reason. Why buy when you can rent from others? Why not make a little cash sharing something you don’t use all the time anyway? Come meet three CEOs in the thick of things, and learn why your mom was right all along: it’s good to share.
Panelists:
Nathanael Nienaber, CEO, Ghostruck
Phil Kimmey, co-founder, Rover
Sean Dobrosky, FlightCar

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Startup Hall Tour
12:30—2pm
Condon Hall
Join us for a tour of Startup Hall, the new hub of innovation in Seattle’s University District. You’ll meet Chris DeVore of TechStars and Founder’s Co-op, UpGlobal’s Marc Nager, and other residents of this new home base for entrepreneurs.

Haiti Babi Blankets
Haiti Babi Blankets

Brace for Impact: Mission-Driven Entrepreneurship
5:30—7:30pm
Dempsey Hall 302
Social entrepreneurship defines success as increasing a company’s bottom line while addressing some of society’s most pressing problems. Come learn how three impact entrepreneurs have taken simple ideas—a restaurant, a baby blanket, a co-working space—and used them to improve our world.
Panelists:
Matt Gurney, FareStart
Katlin Jackson, Haiti Babi
Lindsey Engh, Impact HUB Seattle

Friday, October 17, 2014

2014 UW Innovation Open House
2—5pm
Dempsey Hall 302
Hosted by UW C4C and the Buerk Center, this is your opportunity to: network with local investors, industry leaders, and entrepreneurs; meet the founders and leaders of top UW spinouts; learn about promising new technologies developed in UW research labs; and discover the world of venture and angel investing.

DubHacks
October 17th and 18th will mark the inaugural DubHacks Hackathon, the first and largest hackathon in the Pacific Northwest. The event is being held at the Husky Union Building on the University of Washington campus and has already drawn attention from student hackers across the United States. Seattle, Washington has been chosen for its central location in the Pacific Northwest and for its well-established reputation as a high-tech city and entrepreneurial center. Hosted by Startup UW, Sudo Soldiers, and the Informatics Undergraduate Association.

EMBA summer workshops

The UW Foster Executive MBA student experience actually begins with 36 hours of “summer workshops” held mid-July through mid-August. Designed to prepare incoming students for the many quantitative classes of their first year, the 3 hour workshop sessions cover basic math through calculus, excel and accounting. Students attend the workshops in-person on the Seattle campus, participate virtually or subsequently view recordings of the sessions.

Following the Summer Workshops, students are welcomed “back-to-school” at the end of August for an all day program orientation. At the back-to-school day, students meet their study team and larger cohort, receive fall quarter materials and hear from program alumni. Spouses and significant others are welcomed too. Below are a few photos from the 2014 workshops.

Prof Matsumoto meeting students

EMBA students raising hands

EMBA students networking

EMBA students presenting

EMBA students networking

Classes for first year students begin in late September at the fall Residential.

Learn more about Executive MBA.

Having a real impact

Gabriel Heckt (BBA 2016) reflects on his experience as a summer student consultant with the UW Consulting & Business Development Center.

One of the most unique aspects of the Consulting & Business Development Center’s Summer Consulting Program, and one of the reasons I’m most grateful for having participated in it, is the amount of true creative freedom and independence that is given to  each summer consultant. When I was first reading the description for the position, which outlined a student simultaneously consulting with three small businesses and personally constructing recommendations that would really improve them, I was skeptical. Most short-term business opportunities for students that I had heard of up to that point seemed to involve repetitive grunt work without much room to manage oneself or have a real impact.

Student consultant Gabriel Heckt (BBA 2016) with client Tonyia Smith, owner of Silver Slice Bakery in Seattle.
Student consultant Gabriel Heckt (BBA 2016) with client Tonyia Smith, owner of Silver Slice Bakery in Seattle.

What I experienced this summer was widely different from that perception. As the first few days of orientation began to wrap up, I realized that each student consultant would be individually responsible for their businesses, and the strategies we would eventually present would be all our own. I had to build everything from the ground up: outlining my own projects, carrying out my own research, and forming my own recommendations. I received excellent training and ongoing support from the center and a professional consultant advisor, but ultimately the finished product that would be used by the companies would be my creation. Although this created considerable pressure to create effective recommendations that could be actually used by the companies, the reward of having a real, tangible impact on these small businesses was immense, and is another reason why this program really stands apart from others.

This summer I worked with a gluten-free bakery, a specialty hair care salon, and a clothing boutique, all with their own diverse backgrounds and challenges. I really enjoyed connecting with all of these businesses and getting to know the owners over the course of the program. Working with real people and their livelihoods required my best work to deliver solutions that really addressed the challenges outlined at the beginning. It was incredibly satisfying to hear these owners excited to put the strategies I had created into effect in order to help their businesses.

The wide range of challenges presented to me over the course of the summer pushed me to expand my knowledge of business and step outside my comfort zone. The fact that I had to simultaneously construct a public relations campaign, recreate a website, and streamline a business’s infrastructure meant I was constantly learning new skills, testing new strategies, and improving my time management by leaps and bounds.

The Summer Consulting Program was an amazing opportunity that I recommend every business student apply for. The combination of extensive responsibility, positive pressure to improve, and the tangible impact of my work really made it the most significant experience of my undergraduate business career thus far, and a key part of my journey to becoming a professional consultant.

Foster students manage the business end of the UW’s EcoCAR Challenge

UW's eco carA team of UW students recently took second place in the EcoCAR 2 Challenge. Its modified Chevy Malibu traveled 48 miles on an electric charge before switching to its biodiesel engine—making it the most energy-efficient car in the 15-school international competition. A brilliant feat of engineering.

Behind that engineering was some savvy business support from Foster School students. Nicholas Wilson (MBA 2012), Tyler Rose (MBA 2013) and Taj Matthews (MBA 2013) served as business managers for the first stages of the three-year project. Alex Ong, a senior studying finance, took the engineering and design team through to the finals earlier this year at General Motor’s Milford Proving Ground.

The son of engineers, Ong has no formal technical training of his own. “But I’m interested in cars and I knew a few things,” he says. “Enough to get the conversation going.”

His role was to manage the project’s six-figure budget, cultivate and communicate with sponsors, and provide financial reporting to funders and competition organizers—GM, the US Department of Energy, and a wide range of transportation and renewable energy firms and organizations.

In Detroit, the team finished first in eight categories, including quickest acceleration, lowest energy consumption and least greenhouse gas emissions. While his colleagues put the car through its paces, Ong presented the team’s financials to a panel of judges representing the sponsor organizations.

It was a unique experience, this working collaboration of engineering, business, communications and visual arts.

“There’s nothing like it at the UW,” Ong says. “It was an incredible interdisciplinary learning experience where you had to work together with people who have no knowledge of your expertise and vice-versa. Otherwise, the whole project falls flat.

“That’s about as real world as it gets.”

The UW has been selected to compete in EcoCAR 3 beginning this fall. Ong plans to recruit fellow Foster students to better distribute the workload and formalize procedures to ensure continuity over the project’s four-year run.

The team just learned that they get to play with a Camaro this time around.

Senioritis? Bah. Count Ong in.

Undergrads trek to San Francisco to network with employers

Guest post by Zak Sheerazi, assistant director of career development, Undergraduate Career Services

On August 26 and 27, Foster Undergraduate Career Services took a group of students to San Francisco to visit seven companies. This group of Foster students consisted of finance/accounting majors  interested in working in the Bay Area after they graduate.

Each company visit entailed an overview of the company and provided students the opportunity to network with company representatives. During this two-day trek we also had a San Francisco alumni networking night. Roughly 60 Foster alumni from the San Francisco area met up to network with each other and our current students.

Amy Li, accounting/finance major, had this to say about her experience on the trek, “It was a great opportunity that enabled students to have direct interaction with employers and to learn about their jobs from different perspectives. Communication is an essential skill in career development, thus through this form of networking event, we not only explored the diverse career paths we could choose from but also had the chance to build and present our personal brand.”

We would like to send a special thanks to the employers who participated in the SF Trek: Deloitte, EY, KPMG, Piper Jaffray, Prudential Capital, PwC, and Vaquero Capital.

San Francisco Trek
Photos from the company visits and networking night on the San Francisco Trek.

- Faculty perspectives, alumni happenings, student experiences, Seattle and Pacific Northwest community connections, and a taste of life around the Foster School.