Tag Archives: CISB

Sten Karlholm combines his passions for Swedish and sports

Guest post by Sten Karlholm, Foster senior and Certificate of International Studies in Business student

SwedenSportsInternBlogMy education seems to have taken the scenic tour, as my passion for traveling combined with my studies opened up opportunities and happily postponed my graduation. The journey all began while finishing my third year at UW, which I spent as an exchange student in Uppsala, Sweden as part of the Certificate of International Studies in Business Program (CISB). I had accomplished many of the requirements during this study abroad year, but there was one last challenge I was looking to complete during the summer: the International Business Practicum. It was mid-June and I had been applying and seeking out internships in Sweden for the past two months to no avail. As the long days of the Swedish summer began to come into full effect, there was a sense of anxiousness and uncertainty. I began preparing for the expectation of autumn quarter and flight back to Seattle. I had applied to one job on a whim, with the tag line “Passion for sports.” I had emphasized my passion for the game of basketball and my affinity with golf in my cover letter. After a telephone interview and my first ever sit down interview conducted in Swedish, I was offered a job as part of the opening team for a new Nike Factory Store in Stockholm.

I accepted this opportunity to further my proficiency of the Swedish language and master the fundamentals of Nike in the retail setting. I was dedicated to showing a high level of commitment on the job, tackling the unfamiliar terms of shoe specifics in Swedish while giving the best customer support. Recognition came my way as I took over further responsibilities like closing the store, accounting and submitting daily sales reports.

Nearly a year had gone by and it was time to continue my studies at the Michael G. Foster School of Business. This period away gave me the time to reflect on what I wanted to aim for within a future career, and influenced and ignited my passion for fashion and sports. With this goal in mind, it motivated me to keep looking for opportunities and ultimately led me to where I am today as the product management intern for Club and Balls within Nike Golf at the European Headquarters in Hilversum, The Netherlands.

Keeping up the pursuit of acquiring an international internship paid off as I have now spent seven months learning the ins and outs of Nike and the European marketplace. Every day I am conducting competitor analysis of the club and ball market for various regions and currencies in Europe. I’ve also been an integral part of updating pricing and catalogs for our recently released Covert 2.0 and upcoming RZN golf ball. I was even presented the chance to assist in the set up and lead the tear down at the Nordic Golf Trade show in Sweden due to my language proficiency. Not only was this a phenomenal experience as an intern, but as a result of my abilities I was selected to help out during our go-to-market sales meeting in Spain.

I had finally achieved the goal of receiving an international internship, but the experience is so much more than ticking a box for completion. The lessons learned and experience gained will be invaluable as I continue to pursue a career within international business. I am truly grateful for the opportunities that I’ve received and the support from my peers and colleagues along the way.

CISB student profile: Robby Ryan

Robby Ryan is a senior at the University of Washington Michael G. Foster School of Business, pursuing an option in finance and a minor in Spanish. He is also taking the Certificate of International Studies in Business, Spanish Track.

Robby began studying Spanish during his freshman year at Juanita High School in Kirkland, Washington, and always had the goal of gaining fluency in the language. Upon arriving at the UW, he decided to combine his passion for language, travel and business by joining the Certificate of International Studies in Business Program. After completing second-year Spanish courses, he studied abroad in Santiago, Chile in 2012 as a participant in the semester-long direct exchange program at the business school of the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile. His study abroad experience gave him the opportunity to immerse himself in the Spanish language and Latin American culture, make friends from all over the world and gain first-hand international business experience.

Last summer, Robby worked as a bilingual intern in the Regulatory Affairs Department at Starbucks Coffee Company, where he focused on product registration and labeling in Latin America. Robby credits the CISB program with giving him the language skills and cross-cultural experience he needed to be successful in his internship.

Robby will graduate in the spring of 2014. After graduation, he plans to return to South America to see the World Cup, visit friends and travel as much as he can. In August, he will return to Starbucks, where he has been hired as a quality assurance specialist.

Students take 3rd place in BYU’s Business Spanish Competition

BYU Spanish TeamThis November, the Foster School of Business sent a team of students to compete in the Brigham Young University (BYU) Business Language Case Competition. What is unique about the competition is that it is conducted entirely in a foreign language. Student teams, consisting of non-native speakers, read and analyze a business case written in Spanish, and then present their solutions and answer questions in Spanish.

The Foster School team won third place this year and five hundred dollars. Team members Amanda Baker, Josh Twaddle, and Brandon Upton all studied or interned abroad in Spain, which greatly improved their language skills and gave them the confidence to tackle this case challenge.

The business case they worked on focused on the current market for organic foods. The team was to determine if there is a role for Walmart in this market segment. Brandon shared that their analysis “noted two main problems facing Walmart – first, Walmart has weak brand equity, and second, Walmart lacks an urban presence, which is where most consumption of organic food occurs. However, Walmart had strengths in its supply chain.”

Based on their analysis, the team recommended that “Walmart should launch an entire new line of organic stores that are stocked with products from local farms. By leveraging its supply chain, it could centralize foodstuffs from those farms in a distribution center, and then redistribute to city stores. These new stores would only be in leading urban areas in the U.S., including San Francisco, New York City, and Washington D.C. This ties Corporate Social Responsibility (empowering local farmers with urban demand) to generating new revenue streams from a premium market for Walmart.”

The BYU judges said that the Foster School team took a very innovative approach, and they really appreciated that the team even produced some of their own market research.

Photo: Foster School Faculty Coach, Bob Dawson, with student team members Brandon Upton, Amanda Baker, and Josh Twaddle.

Study abroad photo contest winners for 2013

Over 300 University of Washington Foster School of Business undergraduate and MBA students studied or interned abroad last year.  These photos and short descriptions are a small taste of the transformative educational experiences these students have each year.  The UW Global Business Center held a competition for the best student photos in two categories:

  1. Foster Abroad: Photo that inspires others to study abroad or makes a statement about the student experience abroad
  2. My Global Lens: Views uniquely accessible to students living abroad – social issues, cultural interactions, landscapes, etc.

1st Place Foster Abroad: Kurt RiRicketts_India_FAcketts, Undergraduate; India Business Exploration Seminar

Namaste: What I didn’t expect was that by the end of my visit, India would have me in her grip, refuse to let go, and in exchange for my experience, instill a drive in me that would demand a call to action.

Experience abroad: What an experience. You expect to be challenged, but you don’t expect to be awakened.

 

 

bell_brazil_FA2nd Place Foster Abroad: Kainen Bell, Undergraduate; Brazil Business Exploration Seminar

A Dream Come True: This moment was surreal because ever since high school my dream was to travel to Brazil, but I didn’t think it was possible because no one in my family or community had ever done so. Despite my circumstances I heavily pursued my dream and was accepted in the Brazil program,  received scholarships to pay for it, and was the first in my family to study abroad and now I am a living proof that dreams really do come true, but you can’t be afraid to pursue them.

Experience abroad: My Study Abroad Experience in Brazil was life changing. During the trip my perspective was changed. I saw how essential it was for the Brazilian to learn other languages to and know about global news, while I just knew English and a little Spanish. It made me value different languages and cultures more.  Meeting with Brazilian students was a great experience and cultural exchange – even though we were from different parts of the world, we could still relate to each other and have fun. Overall, I was inspired by this trip and mind blown.

Marks_Argentina_GL1st Place My Global Lens: Kate Marks, Undergraduate; Buenos Aires, Argentina

Convergence: Argentina struggles to reconcile their “dirty” past of military dictatorship with the hopeful future the election of Pope Francisco brings to the country. Taken March 24, 2013, the day of national remembrance of the “disappeared persons”, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Experience abroad: Living and studying in Argentina gave me an unparalleled perspective of what it is like to live with an unstable government and economy. Populism is still alive and well in Argentina, well after the fall of many other Latin American military dictatorships. I spoke with and befriended many young people who see a different future for their country–which now seems possible with the election of the first ever South American (specifically, Argentine) pope. The convergence of Argentina’s violent and unstable recent history with the new movement towards democracy and change created a dynamic and complicated environment in which to live and observe.

Bozeman_Spain_MGL2nd Place My Global Lens: Ashley Bozeman, Undergraduate; Leon, Spain

Las Medulas: An unexpected gold mine in Northern Spain.

Experience abroad: I had a wonderful experience abroad with my 12 amigas from UW, our loving and caring host families, and awesome Spanish teachers at the UW Leon Center in Leon, Spain. These were some of the most rewarding and fun three months of my college career and I would encourage anyone and everyone to study abroad during their time at the UW.

See all photos submitted for the contest. Judges included over 40 faculty and staff members. Learn more about MBA and undergraduate study abroad opportunities at the Foster School.

Japan update: opportunities for 2014 and beyond

Guest post by Ashley Bozeman, senior studying international business and marketing

7C5A3151On Thursday, October 17, I and other students and faculty from the University of Washington had the privilege of enjoying the “Japan Update: Opportunities for 2014 and Beyond” discussion with Koichi Hamada, Tuntex Professor of Economics, Yale University, and Joseph A. Massey, Professor Emeritus, Dartmouth College. Both are esteemed professors with years of international business and economic policy experience. Needless to say, I think many of us Certificate of International Studies in Business (CISB) students were a bit intimidated. I am happy to report that they were far from intimidating; they had everyone laughing throughout and left all of us inspired and optimistic for the future of Japan.

This event was a great eye-opener to some of the problems Japan is currently facing. We had the opportunity to learn from Professor Hamada, Advisor to Japanese Prime Minister Abe, and Professor Massey about possible solutions for strengthening the Japanese economy. Professor Hamada shared that one of the major challenges in Japan today is its aging population. Japan has the oldest population in the world. Consequently, the workforce is declining. Professor Massey stated that the solution should not be an attempt to make up for the decreasing population, but rather an increase in productivity and an adjustment of Japanese cultural norms. Both of our guests touched on better utilizing well-educated women in the work force and working until an older age. Both of which can be done, but will take time and challenge current cultural norms.

Our speakers also discussed business opportunities in Japan due to these demographic changes. The two main opportunities were health care and child care. The population is aging, so health care will be a hugely important and growing sector. In order for more women to pursue higher education and enter the workforce, it is necessary to have more child care opportunities so they are able to work outside the home.

I was impressed by Professor Hamada and Professor Massey’s optimism and their proposed solutions and opportunities for Japan in the coming years. I now have a greater awareness of the Japanese economy and culture and am looking forward to keeping up with the country’s progress in the future.

CISB students intern with Pacific NW Advisors

Pacific NW AdvisorsCameron Geisler, Carl Mars and Matt Sink, Certificate of International Studies in Business (CISB) students, recently completed internships with the Latin American Division of Pacific Northwest Advisors, an international network of global business advisors. Stephen Murphy, senior advisor for Latin America, said it was “a pleasure working with these talented students.”

As an intern, Geisler created a slide presentation concerning Mexico, NAFTA and CAFTA. He conducted extensive research, including research to ascertain who the business “movers and shakers” are in Mexico. He also investigated which international firms and Washington state organizations have invested in Mexico. He presented his findings to the Board of Directors of the US-Mexico Chamber of Commerce (Seattle) where he received much critical acclaim as well as feedback. He also presented to a group from Seattle University that were going to visit Mexico on a service trip.

Mars worked on a presentation about “Doing Business in 21st Century South America,” in which he emphasized the nuances of business in Brazil, Colombia, Chile, Peru and Argentina. He presented to the international team of the Washington State Department of Commerce and the Marine Resource Group of Saltchuk, Seattle’s largest private equity firm.

Sinks’ work focused on Brazil, including a presentation about the future of Brazil which highlighted infrastructure, business and investment opportunities for Washington state firms. He presented at Skagit Valley College’s “Global Fest 2013.”

Learn more about the Foster School’s Certificate of International Studies in Business Program.

Students present to Allrecipes

Guest post by Lisa Anton and Travin Keith, Foster School and CISB Custom Track students

AllrecipesAfter winning the grand prize in the 2013 CISB Foreign Market Strategy Project, the Foster School’s Certificate of International Studies in Business Custom Track students presented their case at the office of Allrecipes on April 11. The students presented in front of a large number of Allrecipes employees and successfully defended their presentation for about an hour, earning compliments from the audience. Their performance was even compared to that of consultants who have presented in the past.

The prize for best teamwork went to the Japanese Track and prize for best presentation to the U.S. Track/Australia team.

Their proposal was to form a strategic alliance with Homeplus, the second largest retailer in South Korea, to provide their content as an additional service to their already-existing E-commerce. Users would be able to look up recipes online provided by Allrecipes and be able to purchase the ingredients on the same page from Homeplus with Allrecipes getting a percentage of the revenue. They also suggested that Allrecipes perform joint marketing projects with Homeplus in order to promote the service.

In addition to presenting to Allrecipes, the Custom Track also received an office tour from VP Patricia Smith and Senior Product Manager Vasantha Kostojohn. This experience was really enjoyable, as the office seemed more like an open community center than the headquarters of a major international recipe site. The décor was open and colorful, adorned with national flags, sticky notes from different team projects, and fun posters with cute animals and motivational quotes. The atmosphere was personal, warm, and mirrored the positive attitude that radiated off all of the staff members present. The track was also able to get a sneak peek of a mobile app that Allrecipes is gearing to launch next year and learned from the lead project manager about its development.

Overall, the Allrecipes office was as colorful and creative as its website, and it was a truly great experience to be able to go behind the scenes of such an innovative company.

Learn more about the Foster School’s Certificate of International Studies in Business Program.

Authentic ramen receives rave reviews

Guest post by Christopher Comley, CISB French Track student

Kukai Owners, Brandon Ting and Nuri Aydinel The first time Foster School alumni Brandon Ting (BA 2009) and Nuri Aydinel (BA 2009) met in class, they didn’t even talk. However, both joined the U.S. track of the Certificate of International Studies in Business program (CISB), and from there began the conversations that would lead to close friendship and a thriving business.

Along with Jessmin Lau, (UW BA 2010), the two are owners of Kukai Ramen and Izakaya, a Japanese noodle restaurant that opened in Bellevue in December and has already garnered widespread praise.  Seattle Magazine recently featured the restaurant in its “Best Restaurants” issue.

“We enjoy when our customers tell us dining in Kukai is the best ramen experience they have had,” Ting said.

It is the first U.S. location of the Kukai Ramen franchise, which has several other locations in Japan.

The restaurant is on a mission to provide “really good ramen to Americans,” Ting said.

The owners first became interested in ramen when they saw how popular it was becoming around the world.

“People are getting to know ramen and are becoming huge fans of it. We saw that the ramen fans in Seattle (and most of the U.S.) don’t get to enjoy a bowl of authentic ramen,” Ting said.

Facing such a culinary deficiency, the owners began preparations to satisfy the ramen needs of the Seattle area. They traveled to Japan several times, searching for the perfect ramen to bring back, and eventually came across Kukai. Media publications claimed customers who didn’t normally like ramen liked the ramen from Kukai.

“That got us curious so we went to try it,” Ting said.

The owners discovered Kukai had a special cooking method for the ramen, which made it more palatable to the Japanese market and potentially the American one as well. After deciding which ramen to use, the owners began preparations to open a franchise in the U.S., a process which took two years. In reaching its goal to provide authentic ramen to the American market, the owners needed authentic ingredients, but they encountered several FDA obstacles. Under FDA regulations, all ingredients have to be from a certified manufacturer. Originally, Kukai’s ingredients were not FDA approved, but the owners decided the authenticity was worth the price.

“We actually got the manufacturer certified under U.S. standards in order to import the ingredients,” Ting said.

Ting attributes the success of the restaurant to the lengthy planning process.

“We had several changes to our plan, which involved a lot of analyzing and calculating. The long and thorough planning and preparation process was the real key to our ‘rapid’ success,” Ting said.

With plans to open up 30 to 50 more Kukai restaurants across the country, Seattleites won’t be the only ones enjoying warm bowls of authentic ramen.

Learn more about the Certificate of International Studies in Business Program.

The 2013 International Business Club Summit- a student’s experience

Post by Vi Nguyen, CISB student

Vi Nguyen IBC

Thank you to the Global Business Center for giving me for the opportunity to attend the third annual International Business Club (IBC) Summit 2013 at the Fisher College of Business, The Ohio State University. The IBC had prepared an intense two-day summit for the purpose of gathering international business clubs from across the U.S. to share their best practices and develop deeper global awareness. This experience was very inspirational in many ways.

Prior to the event, each student had to fill out an IES (Intercultural Effectiveness Scale) survey. The idea focused on the likelihood of your working effectively with people whose cultural backgrounds differs from yours. This survey related to one of the sessions that were hosted on the first day, which was an assessment debriefing by Dr. Larry Inks, Department of Management and Human Resources, Fisher College of Business, The OSU. Dr. Larry Inks explained the purpose of the IES and emphasized that this assessment allows for an individual to seek out growth opportunities, to grow and develop based on our results. The IES provided us with the information on areas where there is room for improvements and to consider. He further mentioned that our position as college students is the richest environment for global reach.

The next event was the best practices presentation where each club had to give a 10-minute presentation on their club’s best practices and why they think their club is doing a good job for its members. It was then followed by an international trivia/jeopardy quiz where the questions were based from the issues of The Economist magazine. Additional questions were from general awareness and knowledge on global issues, geography, politics, cultures, etc. To end the first night of the summit, we had dinner and the chance for students to network with each other. We also had the honor to have Kent Larsson, currently a retail marketing consultant for The Gordman Group. Mr. Larsson shared his senior positions in marketing, merchandising, and strategic planning during his 30 years in specialty and general merchandise retailing companies such as Big Lots. He also spoke about the challenges of working overseas and of course the rewards of it.

The second day was an intense simulation on making great global decision based on the topic “China in Africa: Savior or self-interest”. This simulation was created by the Foreign Policy Association that requires robust discussion and consensus building on international topic and was facilitated by Shannon McAfee, Columbus council on World Affairs (who is also from Washington). After reviewing the topic, each team was to debate their positions on elements of this topic and present their points of view to all the participants. To end the summit, we had a keynote speaker: Mr. Patrick Terrien, President and CEO, Columbus Council of World Affairs. We had the opportunity to hear Mr. Terriens biography and how he was exposed to globalization. He then led an informal discussion on the topic of The Business of Global Awareness.

Through this experience, I had the opportunity to learn compelling best practices from other clubs across the U.S., build global competitiveness through survey feedback, test my knowledge with Economist quiz, network with peers also interested in global careers, participate in Foreign Policy Association global simulation and gain a competitive edge by expanding global awareness.

 

Digital marketing with a global team- a conversation with Justin Calvo, CISB alum and CIBER advisory board member

Justin CalvoJustin Calvo is the Global Director of Digital Marketing at Avanade, a global Microsoft technology integrator. He is a 2002 alumnus of the Foster School and the Certificate of International Business Studies (CISB) program, and is a member of the Global Business Center’s CIBER advisory board.

Tell us about Avanade. How did you get your start?

Avanade is a global Microsoft technology integrator.  Standing on the shoulders of our parent companies, Microsoft and Accenture, Avanade delivers insight, expertise and innovation across all industries to realize business results. After spending two years at a Seattle venture capital fund, the opportunity to work for a young company with incredible vision and backing was an entrepreneur’s dream.  One of the things that attracted me to Avanade was the idea that the company was truly global on the day it opened its doors for business a few years earlier.  Being global has always been an important part of the culture at Avanade.

I’ve had many roles in my 10 years with the company – responsibilities for delivering projects, managing global customers, directing an industry team and currently incubating Avanade’s Digital Marketing business focusing on helping marketers drive business value by improving the customer experience.

What is it like to manage a global team? What are some challenges you’ve faced, and insights you’ve gained?

Managing and being part of a globally connected team is one of my favorite parts of working for Avanade. The opportunity to work across a diversity of customer business problems with dynamic global teams and leading innovations is a large part of what drives me each day.

One critical lesson I learned early on at Avanade was that global means much more than simply working across continents.  It’s about having the scale and depth of insight and expertise to address complex, multi-faceted business situations. This past winter I had the opportunity to travel to Asia to spend time with some of our customers’ marketing leaders.  Perhaps no one inside a business understands how to support global needs like marketers, who increasingly require greater scale and insights to reach dynamic consumers and markets.  Meeting these diverse needs and doing it at the speed of today’s consumer requires a global approach.  The Chinese and German marketplaces are two extreme examples where global skills are necessary to navigate a complex ecosystem country-specific marketing channels as in China’s case, or to ensure ongoing compliance with Germany’s strict consumer privacy laws.

How did your time at the Foster School influence your interests and career?

The Foster School of Business and the CISB program gave me a strong foundation and framework to address business challenges in a global context.  Learning about how the global economy operates was essential to understanding my role in it and planning out my career.  Spending time studying and working abroad reinforced my passion for global interactions.  One of the most rewarding surprises I hadn’t fully considered or appreciated during my time at UW were the connections I built with classmates and teachers.  My classmates have gone on to drive incredible impact in global business.  Staying connected with many of them has allowed me to see the global economy and my career path from various angles.

What is one thing that you would tell students about the world of global business?

In 2000, when Avanade was established as a global business and I was still preparing to join the workforce, most new companies viewed being global as a destination.  This has changed.  Today every business must act globally.  The emerging start-up must consider the scale at which their innovation will address problems and the Fortune 100 enterprise must take stock of whether they have the agility they require to keep pace with the dynamic markets they serve.

As long as companies remain transfixed on growth – global will be a requirement.  Use this time in the Foster School of Business to gain valuable knowledge about the underpinnings of the global economy, and also to consider the tools and connections you will require to address the complex, multifaceted challenges that lead to tomorrow’s global opportunities.