Tag Archives: economic development

Board Fellows: making an impact and growing managerial skills

Johnnie MobleyJohnnie Mobley discovered the UW Business and Economic Development Center Board Fellows Program during his second year as an evening MBA student. Mobley was looking for an opportunity to make an impact in his community, learn about the process of becoming a board member and develop his leadership potential. In 2010, the Rainier Chamber of Commerce selected him as their board fellow.

During his fellowship Mobley was able to acquire executive management experience by having a direct and hands-on impact on how programs operate and help mold a community. He adds, “If there was ever a time for creativity, it is when you are serving a non-profit organization. If you want to be creative and innovative, serving in a non-profit organization is the place for you because there are goals that need to be met and there are extremely limited resources. I think that anyone who wants to be in management and is looking to further their career should serve on a non-profit board because it is a place where you can see if you have what it takes to be in management.”

The UW BEDC Board Fellows Program has been an integral component of the UW Foster MBA experience for the last 12 years and since 2009 of the UW Evans Masters in Public Administration program. As a board fellow, graduate students are provided the opportunity to serve for one year as non-voting members of local non-profits’ board of directors.

Mobley graduated from the Foster MBA Program in 2012 and currently works for Boeing. Upon graduation from the Board Fellows Program he was officially invited to join the board of the Rainier Valley Chamber and is now serving as treasurer. The Board Fellows Program is supported by Wells Fargo Bank and UPS. Learn how to nominate a nonprofit to become part of the Board Fellows Program.

Seattle Metropolitan Chamber expands support for multicultural and small businesses

Guest post by Rita Brogan, CEO of PRR

The Seattle Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce has expanded its support for small and minority-owned businesses with a new executive position. Since February 2012, small business owner Regina Glenn has served as the Chamber’s vice president of multicultural and small business development.

The new position will integrate the functions of the Urban Enterprise Center (UEC) into the operations of the Chamber. Established in 1993 as an affiliate of the Chamber, the UEC was charged with helping grow minority-owned businesses. Last spring, UEC and Chamber leaders convened a task force to determine how best to serve this mission. Their top recommendation was to create a Chamber executive role that would build on the UEC’s work while taking better advantage of the Chamber’s small-business services. These programs include networking events, professional development workshops, policy advocacy and employee benefits like health insurance and 401(k) plans.

Regina Glenn, Seattle Chamber of Commerce VP of multicultural and small business development

“The Chamber is quite the resource if you know how to use it,” says Glenn. She brings to this position her decades of commitment to advancing diverse businesses. She first moved to Seattle in the late 1970s as Mayor Royer’s director of licensing and consumer affairs. In the early 1990s she began a consulting practice, Pacific Communications Consultants, that specialized in diversity training and contracting outreach to minority-owned businesses. At the same time she published Diversity Business News from 1990-1994.

Glenn’s hands are full. She is busy establishing partnerships with organizations such as the Tabor 500, the Northwest Minority Supplier Development Council, Filipino Chamber of Commerce of the Pacific Northwest, King County Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and others.

She is also launching a number of new initiatives that will help multicultural and small businesses take full advantage of the Chamber’s business services such as:

  • An online resource for small businesses with information such as how to access capital.
  • A “how to do business with…” series to help smaller businesses form ongoing relationships with larger corporations.
  • A business growth and development series starting this winter, featuring successful business speakers.
  • A business accelerator program that will match established minority businesses with a major corporation in the region, starting in fall 2013.

“This is not a social service,” says Glenn. “We are about increasing profits for multicultural businesses and integrating them into all aspects of the Chamber’s programs and policy advocacy.”

We will be announcing the Chamber’s new multicultural programs as they come on line. It promises to be a great resource for minority entrepreneurs.

Rita Brogan is the CEO of PRR, a public affairs and communications firm based in Seattle, one of Washington’s 50 largest minority-owned businesses. Brogan was a recent recipient of the Foster School’s Business and Economic Development Center Asian/Pacific Islander Business Leadership Award. She writes the BEDC Brogan blog series monthly. Previously, she covered green economy issues with an emphasis on ways that businesses owned by people of color or women can create a competitive advantage. Her current blog topic focus is on innovation.