Tag Archives: marketing

Is your marketing vision 20/20?

Guest post by Marissa Freeman, UW undergraduate and VP of public relations, UW American Marketing Association

UW American Marketing Association Regional Marketing ConferenceOver 150 students and professionals gathered in PACCAR Hall in February for a full day of keynote speakers, breakout sessions, a case competition and a career fair as part of the first annual UW American Marketing Association Regional Marketing Conference. The conference’s theme was “Vision 20/20: A Clear Vision into Marketing in the New Millennium,” and it was sponsored by Eddie Bauer. Foster’s EY Center for Undergraduate Career Advancement and the UW American Marketing Association co-facilitated the event.

Professionals from 4th Avenue Media, KeyBank, Razorfish, Eddie Bauer and Edelman participated in the conference and students from UW, Seattle University, Pacific Lutheran, University of Montana and Western Washington University attended the conference. During the breakout sessions, marketing professionals led students in discussions about how to stand out in the marketing industry. The breakout sessions covered how marketing in a digital world means understanding the language of a digital market. Mel Carlson, founder of Delightful Communications, shared his take on how social media is more than a way to flood people with information, but rather a way to begin discussions with customers. He made the point that conversations online have shared the B2C dynamic for the better.

Keynote speakers included Lucas Mack, founder of 4th Avenue Media, and William Boucher, senior vice president of marketing at KeyBank. Mack opened up the conference with encouraging our attendees to understand “the why” behind their actions and how it fits into their larger story. Standing out in the marketing industry means finding creative ways to tell a story. Story telling is at the core of the marketing world, as suggested by Mack, and helps marketers connect with their audiences like never before. Adding the story telling element to any marketing campaign allows for the target audience to understand why they should look more into a product or idea. Mack also shared his personal mantra: “Discover truth through story, discover story through truth.” This helped attendees see how crucial it is to be open and excited about advertising and marketing so the truth behind the product or idea’s story comes to life.

Students shared that the conference as a whole was worth the early wake-up call. While marketing classes teach the core ideals of the industry, nothing can compare to hearing from professionals in a more casual, intimate setting. The UW AMA’s Regional Marketing Conference created an environment for students to raise their hand and open up a discussion between marketers in Fortune 500 companies and aspiring marketers.

The buzz throughout PACCAR Hall was one of excitement, intellect and passion. There was an excitement for conversations, the intellect of those professionals in attendance and students’ passion to learn. The UW AMA and EY Center for Undergraduate Career Advancement are proud to have hosted the first annual Regional Marketing Conference and look forward to organizing this event again next year.

Foster team wins Intercollegiate Marketing Competition for third time

Jordan Barr, Marnie Brown, Elliott Klein, and Leta BeardOn February 23, 2013 Foster students won the Intercollegiate Marketing Competition held at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, Canada. This is the third time Foster students have won the competition. The case was about Modo, a Vancouver co-op that offers a car sharing program. The students had three hours to read the marketing case and prepare a solution. At the competition they had 20 minutes to present their solution and 10 minutes for Q&A with the judges.

The judges commented on how professional the team was and how they were the only team to “understand the total picture” of the problem and address the main issue Modo is facing.

The team was comprised of Jordan Barr, Marnie Brown and Elliott Klein, all are juniors at Foster and members of the UW American Marketing Association (AMA). They, along with Leta Beard, their faculty coach and lecturer of marketing at Foster, traveled to Vancouver to compete in the competition. Barr is president of AMA and studying marketing, Brown is studying accounting and Klein is studying marketing. The three were selected from a pool of applicants from the UW American Marketing Association.

“I am extremely proud of this team. They worked very hard on their case practice sessions and took the initiative to learn as much as they could before heading up to Vancouver. The judges came up to the team after the announcement and commented on how well they did and said they were anxious to implement some of the team’s suggestions,” said Beard.

The American Marketing Association is a national organization comprised of marketing professionals and students of marketing. The UW AMA is a student run organization at the Foster School of Business.

Student Consulting Program – student perspective

Guest post by Rai Huang, Foster undergraduate

BEDC Student Consulting ProgramI initially enrolled in the BEDC Student Consulting Program without really understanding what consulting means; my impression was that consulting is the dream job of many of my peers at the Foster School of Business, yet it wasn’t something I particularly cared for.

I expected to walk away from the class with experience in conducting market research and formulating online marketing/public relations strategies, which is related to my dream career after graduation. And I liked the idea of working with a team; the communication skills learned would prepare me for work in any field. The fact that it would look good on my resume didn’t hurt either.

My team’s assignment is to formulate online marketing and social media strategies for our client, Concourse Concessions, who currently operates a Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf franchise in the Seattle-Tacoma Airport. A newcomer in the Seattle market, they wish to grow brand recognition through traditional and non-traditional public relations methods as they expand to locations outside of the airport within the next year. It was an exciting task to take on, as the overall business environment and market for coffee in Seattle is very saturated, and would require creative thinking to accomplish the mission.

The first step for our team was to identify the strategy and comparative advantage of the franchise.  Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf has only been in operations for about three months, and there was lack of substantial data for us to analyze. Challenged by our advisers and mentors, we were able to take a step back and look at the project from a wider perspective. We learned to think in terms of what is most valuable for the client every step of the way. With the support of our mentor and advisors, we came up with a framework in which every question raised had to be answered in a way that would help the business.

During the research phase of the project we gathered survey data and took a close look at local competitors such as Peet’s Coffee and Tea, Uptown Espresso, Espresso Vivace and Café Vita. We examined how they are utilizing social media and promotion strategies to maximize brand equity. Marketing concepts we’ve seen play out in real life include: how social media is being utilized for Customer Relation Management; how Search Engine Optimization is becoming increasingly intertwined with social media; why it’s essential for all business owners and managers to understand the marketing concept; how to really use a business’ competitive advantage; and how to communicate through interaction with the consumers.

As we come near to the end of the project, I now understand what consulting really comes down to is communication. It is important to practice the art of listening to your client and really hearing their needs, and finding resources and formulating recommendations with your team to create value for them. Through the process of tackling the different obstacles, my team and I have bonded together and grown both professionally and personally.

I look forward to applying the skills I’ve learned to a future career in Public Relations. I now understand what it is like to work with a real client, how to identify their wants and needs, and strategically come up with solutions that would benefit the client and heighten awareness of the brand. The Student Consulting experience is not just a line on my resume, but truly a real-world experience I was fortunate to have as an undergraduate student.

Learn more or become involved in the Student Consulting Program as a client or volunteer advisor.

Former Schwab CMO and “mad woman” illuminates “talk to Chuck” case study in MBA advertising class

 
It’s Thursday afternoon, and in one of the University of Washington Foster School of Business classrooms, former Charles Schwab Chief Marketing Officer Becky Saeger was talking to MBA students about the experience of digging deep to revitalize a major brand. As the architect and marketing protagonist of the integrated “Talk to Chuck” campaign platform, Saeger had plenty to offer the students on this Harvard Schwab Case.

Former Schwab CMO Becky Saeger (middle) with Associate Dean Dan Turner and Senior Lecturer Elizabeth Stearns

She discussed the importance of the big picture marketing process. From there the focus was on the decision metrics, advertising strategy and execution, and ultimately how that contributed to Schwab’s overall brand objectives.

Saeger’s also great in her capacity as guest lecturer, which was her role in Marketing 540, taught by Elizabeth Stearns, senior lecturer. Saeger brings to life the lay of the land at Schwab. The year was 2004 and the CEO who hired her was replaced by Charles “Chuck” Schwab himself, reclaiming his role as CEO of the $4.2 billion company he founded in 1971. Saeger reinforced the problem as described in the Harvard case, on the potential for losses and eroding customer loyalty, as the company struggles to fulfill its promise to the individual investor.

Following Professor Stearns’ lead, Saeger asked as many questions as she answered. One interesting aspect of this class is that Stearns does not play the role of professor—but rather that of a marketing client. Students have formed teams acting as advertising agencies vying for Stearns’ business. There’s very little handholding – and that’s good, because as any marketing agency veteran will attest, clients expect initiative and brilliance. The students demonstrated considerable chutzpah—one memorable moment occurring when a student agency, Drapers’ Disciples, turned down Saeger’s request for an additional $50 million budget with their excellent ROI analysis.

In the end Saeger won out with exceptional rationale; moreover, she proved success.

This teaching model brings intense realism into the classroom, as do guests like Becky Saeger.  There was an exhilarating quality to the session, and an overwhelming sense that Foster MBAs are getting the best of rigor where it intersects relevance to their futures.

As a side note, there was some irony that the ‘agency’ challenging Saeger’s budget request was “Draper’s Disciples.” As it turns out, she began her career at Ogilvy & Mather in NY, where she made a name for herself with global brand campaigns for American Express, among other clients. A true Madison Avenue prodigy.

Marketing failure: iPhone in India

Guest post by Shailendra Jain, associate professor of marketing, UW Foster School of Business

iphoneApple has been called “the most admired company in the world.” There are some good reasons for this. Apple is very innovative, very cool, very personality-oriented.

But while Apple’s iPhone has achieved landmark success in the United States and redefined the smart phone category, it has so far struggled in two of the world’s largest markets. The iPhone has yet to create much interest in India and is, at best, a fledgling brand in China.

It has not met the success in these markets that Apple expected for a variety of reasons.

First is a technology issue. In India, the market I’m most familiar with, the iPhone has compatibility issues. That’s an amazing thing to ignore. Your product has to be aligned with the context in which you are marketing it. Apple, reportedly, is in talks with carriers in China and India to overcome this compatibility issue and is believed to be launching an iPhone with CDMA technology, which is compatible with Chinese and Indian telecom standards. It will be interesting to see whether this enables Apple to capture a larger chunk of these two enormous markets.

Second is a pricing issue. At its introduction, an iPhone cost about the same price in India as it did in the U.S. (about $700). But the way consumers process price information is interesting. In India, many potential customers reasoned that for the price of three iPhones they could buy a Nano car. And they were not sure if this was a good trade off. For these consumers, Apple may have gotten the price wrong. They may have ignored the how people in these countries process price information.

A third reason is that people in India are used to an unlocked phone. Apple does not want people to buy unlocked versions of its phone. But the moment there is a gray market where people can buy another compatible version of the iPhone, Apple will be challenged.

A fourth reason—and this is personal speculation—is a misalignment of “softer” brand attributes. What Apple as a brand means in the U.S. is very different from what Apple means in Asian countries. It was born in the U.S. and has produced a long line of successful “i” gadgets—iMac, iPod, iPad—whose branding is rooted in individuality. This is clever branding, and has been a good fit for an influential segment of the American and Western population: rebels, early adopters, would-be innovators who want cutting-edge technology and are relatively less sensitive to price. In Asian countries this is not such a strong fit, in terms of perceived personality. Asian cultures tend to be more collectivistic, and the theory is that millions of consumers in these cultures may find “i” less appealing than “we.”

For the iPhone, a whole set of factors converge to the same outcome. And I think this is typical of marketing failures. Rarely is it the fault of one or two factors. Usually it’s a complex confluence of multiple factors—product design, pricing, revenue model, distribution, promotion, branding, competition. Underestimating your weaknesses or overestimating your strengths. More often than not, multiple factors feed into most marketing failures.

See 15 Cautionary Tales: Failed Marketing Campaigns for more information.

Marketing failure: New Coke

Guest post by Dan Turner, senior lecturer in marketing, associate dean for masters programs and executive education at the UW Foster School of Business

newcokeNew Coke is—for my money—the most epic new product fail in marketing, more so than the DeLorean, Apple’s Lisa and Newton, Sony’s Betamax, and even the Edsel.

Many people have selective memories about the Coca-Cola Company’s decision to launch the product and the initial consumer reaction. Coke’s market share had been falling for years, and consumers overall expressed a strong preference for Pepsi over Coca-Cola in blind taste tests. The new, improved, sweeter formulation of Coke tested extremely well, with more people preferring the New Coke formula over both “old” Coke and Pepsi.

In a naïve way, it made perfect sense for the Coca-Cola Company to improve their product, making up for a known deficiency versus a focal competitor. In fact, sales analysis trends immediately following the product launch showed significant gains for the Coca-Cola Company. In informal blind taste tests, Seattle retiree Gary Mullins, founder of Old Cola Drinkers of America, failed to distinguish between old and new Coke or expressed a preference for the latter.

Of course, we know the rest of the story. The public revolt ensued shortly thereafter, and it had little to do with the taste of the soda. In launching the new version of Coke, the Coca-Cola Company had a made a fundamental error in forgetting the source of the value it was truly offering consumers.

A soda that tasted good was nice, but Coca-Cola really offered value on the basis of its strong, favorable, and unique brand associations: America, friendship, nostalgia, and the like. In changing the formula, the company walked away from all of these sources of value, and customers reacted strongly, emotionally, and in a predictable fashion.

The silver lining for the Coca-Cola Company rested in the fact that the re-introduced product, Coca-Cola Classic, created a firestorm of marketing communications activity, reminding consumers why Coke was so great in the first place and dramatically communicating the value of the brand.

See 15 Cautionary Tales: Failed Marketing Campaigns for more information.

Marketing win: VW Beetle

Guest post by Elizabeth Stearns, senior lecturer in marketing, UW Foster School of Business

vwbugWhen the Beetle was first introduced in the early 1960s, people would joke that you could go up a hill or you could have heat in a Bug, but you couldn’t do both. It was a quirky car, to put it mildly. Even VW engineers called it a lemon.

But the company positioned the Beetle as a different kind of automobile with a unique personality in a series of funny, brilliant advertisements. It found a target audience that was really interested in expressing their own personality, and they found this car was an extension of who they were. A generation of Beetle drivers reveled in its lack of frills. They didn’t care if you could drive up the hill with the heat on.

Then when the New Beetle was introduced in 1998, decades after the original was retired, the big issue was: how do you guide Baby Boomers down memory lane while also attracting the younger generation, because you need to grow that market and the Beetle is an entry vehicle into the VW line?

Cadillac had tried to attract younger drivers for years and failed because they simply did not want to drive their father’s car. There was the same danger for the reintroduced Beetle. It’s very difficult to design a campaign that successfully reaches two different demographic targets.

But VW pulled it off. The campaign was genius, with modern taglines like “Less flower, more power,” that sparked nostalgia in Boomers and spoke individuality to Millennials. The result was immediate success, creating a new “odd-shaped” category that would soon see competition in the reintroduced Mini Cooper, the PT Cruiser and others.

The original Beetle is a superb example of a flawed product saved by great marketing. And the marketing that launched its reintroduction was even better.

See 15 Cautionary Tales: Failed Marketing Campaigns for more information.

Luxury brands are here to stay

Guest post by Gary Shansby, Foster alumnus (BA 1959)

There has been a lot of talk these past several months about whether luxury brands will survive the recession, and whether “premiumization” is dead. Contrary to what the pundits, consultants and bankers may be saying, I believe certain niche premium brands are not only surviving the recession but actually creating inroads and growing in this down economy.

I have spent the past 50 years building luxury and premium consumer brands such as Famous Amos Cookies, Mauna Loa Macadamias, Shaklee Nutritional Products, Terra Chips, Voss Water, Pureology Hair Care Products and my latest brand venture, Partida Tequila.

While I’ve never experienced economic conditions of the current level, I have been through numerous market and economic roller coasters and I can say from years of experience that the biggest mistake a luxury brand marketer can make in an economic downturn is to abandon the premium brand positioning and begin price promotions and discounting. This will provide short-term sales relief but ultimately doom the brand—once you break a price, there’s no going back up market.

America has become an investment nation focused on the here and now, and on short-term (quarter-to-quarter) results. Public company CEOs and management teams are unrealistically forced to deal with stock prices, temporary or current trends, and demands built by financial institutions. We know how weak many of those institutions have become.

As a former CEO of a Fortune 500 company, an investor and a proud entrepreneur, I do not believe “premiumization” is dead. Marketers must learn that the growth path to success is not a straight line, and variances occur along the journey of life. Consumers are becoming more and more interested and knowledgeable about what they purchase and especially about what they put in their bodies. I believe premium brands will resume the upward momentum once the economic downswing lightens, and consumer confidence comes back.

I believe that brands that discount, offer lower “deals,” and change their direction for temporary gain will succumb to a form of suicide. Brand equity is all important along with the highest quality products that can be made.

Only time will tell… but my bet is on future growth for truly great premium brands.

Gary Shansby is founder, chairman and CEO of Partida Tequila, LLC and on the advisory board of the UW Foster School of Business.

What do you think? Will premium or luxury brands survive the down economy?