Geographers Discuss the Kilburn Manifesto at Annual Meeting of the AAG

This year's Annual Meeting of the Association of American Geographers features a session on the newly emerging Kilburn Manifesto. Participants included, from left to right, Victoria Lawson (University of Washington), Kathie Gibson (University of Western Sydney), and Doreen Massey (Open University).

This year’s Annual Meeting of the Association of American Geographers features a session on the newly emerging Kilburn Manifesto. Participants included, from left to right, Victoria Lawson (University of Washington), Kathie Gibson (University of Western Sydney), and Doreen Massey (Open University).

The Kilburn Manifesto was discussed at the AAG meetings in Tampa in April by Doreen Massey (Open University, UK), one of the founding editors along with Stuart Hall and Michael Rustin.  The ‘Manifesto’ is being written (and published online at Soundings) to stimulate people on the Left to shift the parameters of debate about the current crisis-ridden conjuncture of ‘neoliberal forms’.  The founding stimulus for the manifesto is that economic expressions of neoliberalism are undergoing crisis but the social and political fields of grounded neoliberalism remain robust.  The Kilburn Manifesto aims towards intellectual and political openings towards “…a new political era and new understandings of what constitutes a ‘good society'” Hall, Massey and Rustin, 2013: 8).

The AAG session was sponsored by Environment and Planning A and featured two discussants, Kathie Gibson (University of Western Sydney) and Victoria Lawson (University of Washington).  The content of the session will be published by the journal in the coming months.

Common Good Cafe session with Matt Sparke

tMarch 20 | Resistance, Resilience and Reaction Amidst Rising Inequality

In this talk, Dr. Matt Sparke reflects on the divergent ways in which communities and individuals around the world are responding to the challenges of growing in-country inequality. Author most recently of “Introducing Globalization,” Sparke argues that when local forms of suffering, dispossession and alienation are put in their global context it becomes easier to imagine more collective and caring kinds of response. Too often, though, reactionary responses based on various forms of chauvinism, xenophobia, and fear take precedence, blinding communities to the ways they share common vulnerabilities with others. Yet other responses focus just on individualistic strategies of securing personal resilience. The challenge then is to see how these varied responses – the new 3 Rs of resistance, reaction and resilience – relate to one another, and how understanding their overlapping emergence amidst global structural change may ultimately make it possible to turn the passions and preferences for reaction and resilience into the foundations for collectively resisting the processes that produce inequality.