Graduate Students Participate in Dissertation Proposal Workshop

Friday Harbor Participants From left to right: Eloho Tobrise, Skye Naslund, Arianna Thompson, Emma Slager, Jason Young, Yanning Wei

Friday Harbor Participants
From left to right: Eloho Basikoro, Skye Naslund, Arianna Thompson, Emma Slager, Jason Young, Yanning Wei

This past weekend six UW Geography graduate students headed off to participate in a writing retreat in Friday Harbor on San Juan Island. The retreat, led by Dr. Michael Brown, was designed to help PhD students to workshop dissertation proposals. It also gives students the opportunity to find out more about one another’s research and to experience the UW’s beautiful facilities in Friday Harbor. All participants found the retreat very helpful, and are grateful for the opportunity. Funding for the event was generously provided by the Durden Fellowship and by the Friends of Geography fund.

Congratulations to Guilan Weng for a Successful Dissertation Defense!

Guilan with her Committee From left to right: Suzanne Withers, Kam Wing Chan, Guilan Weng, David Bachman, Dan Abramson

Guilan with her Committee
From left to right: Suzanne Withers, Kam Wing Chan, Guilan Weng, David Bachman, Dan Abramson

Please join us in congratulating Guilan Weng for successfully defending her dissertation, ‘Moving towards Neoliberal(izing) Urban Space? Housing and Residential Segregation in Beijing’. Her supervisory committee included Dr. Kam Wing Chan, Dr. Suzanne Withers, Dr. David Bachman, and Dr. Dan Abramson (Urban Planning, GSR). Pending the completion of minor revisions, she has fulfilled all the requirements for the doctoral degree. Congrats Guilan!

UW Student Mollie Holmberg to Present Congress with Research on ‘Understanding Patterns of Human Dependence on Agruclture and Forest Production in the Anthropocene’

Mollie HolmbergEvery year the Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR), a not-for-profit educational organization, holds an undergraduate poster session on Capitol Hill. This session seeks to ensure that the US Congress has a clear understanding of the education programs and students that they fund. The 18th Annual Posters on the Hill received over 600 applications from eligible undergraduate students, and we are very happy to announce that UW student Mollie Holmberg was one of 60 applicants selected to participate in the event. Mollie has been working with Dr. Luke Bergmann on a topic titled ‘Understanding Patterns of Human Dependence on Agriculture and Forest Production in the Anthropocene’. This project attempts to represent global sociological relationships, in the form of environmental resource-trade-consumption linkages, using Geographic Information Systems. You can find the full abstract for the project below. Congratulations to Mollie and Dr. Bergmann, and best of luck presenting your findings to Congress!


Understanding Patterns of Human Dependence on Agriculture and Forest Production in the Anthropocene

Mollie Holmberg, University of Washington, 2014
Luke Bergmann, University of Washington

Diverse lines of evidence indicate that humans have come to dominate many environmental and climate systems across the globe, prompting some researchers to declare the present part of a new geologic age known as the “Anthropocene.” Since plants form the base of many biological ecosystems (including those to which people belong) and agriculture alone covers approximately forty percent of land surface, studying how humans appropriate Earth’s plant production allows us to explore one of the most significant ways people have come to dominate Earth systems. Previous work has mapped the global distribution of plant growth supporting humans but failed to fully link this production to specific populations. To understand these connections, we begin by tracing global agricultural and forest production through a simplified representation of the global economy (containing about sixty million economic flows). To do this, we use global economic data collected by the Global Trade Analysis Project, enabling us to connect fields and forests with the often distant human populations whose lives they eventually support. Our model accounts for indirect plant consumption (for example, factory products require plant consumption by laborers) as well as plant materials people consume directly. Mapping these results and transforming them through Geographic Information Systems (software which can visually and computationally manipulate the results in diverse ways) allows us to describe major intersecting processes of globalization linking distant peoples and lands. For us to respond effectively to the increased human domination of Earth systems, improving our understanding of these socioecological relationships will be critical.

Grad Students Attend 8th Annual Critical Geographies Conference

Back row (left to right): Maggie Wilson, William McKeithen, Annie Crane, Meredith Kreuger, Yanning Wei  Middle: Key MacFarlane, Kidan Araya  Front: Skye Naslund, Emma Slager, Jennifer Porter, Austin Crane

Back row (left to right): Maggie Wilson, William McKeithen, Annie Crane, Meredith Kreuger, Yanning Wei
Middle: Key MacFarlane, Kidan Araya
Front: Skye Naslund, Emma Slager, Jennifer Porter, Austin Crane

 

This past November the Peninsula College in Port Angeles, WA held the Eighth Annual Critical Geographies Conference, a regional conference which encourages collaboration and sharing between geographers in the region. Thanks to the generous funding provided by the Friends of Geography Fund, 11 of our department’s grad students were able to attend and present at the conference. In total the conference offered 29 presentations spread out over 4 sessions, including a Keynote Address by Dr. Paul Kingsbury and a concluding poem by Dr. Tim Cresswell. All of our grads say it was a fantastic event! See what they talked about in their papers below:

Maggie Wilson
The Concept of Landscape in Historical Context and Contemporary Use: A ‘Way of Seeing’ the Public Status and Political Dynamics of In-Home Care

Annie Crane
Digital Care? Exploring trans-masculine care in YouTube

Key MacFarlane
From the Academy to the Workplace: The Reappropriation of Radical Concepts for Capital Accumulation

William McKeithen and Skye Naslund
Parasitic Biocapital: Digesting the Nonhuman Ontologies of Biocapital

Yanning Wei
Placing Politics of Space in Poverty Research: Rural to Urban Migrant Workers and Hukou in China

Austin Crane
Development, security, and bordering: the uneven geography of migration management in Ukraine

Emma Slager
Representing Ruins: Tourism in Detroit

Meredith Krueger
Race and labor in the Ohio dairy industry

Jenniger Porter
Anti-violence activism and (re)placing responsibility through public art

Kidan Araya
The impact of nutritionally fortified food on the food and landscape for the treatment of malnutrition in developing countries