Meet the new Graduate Student Cohort of 2015!


From left to right: Rod Palmquist, Rob Anderson, Rebecca Stubbs, Olivia Hollenhorst, Edgar Sandoval, Elizabeth Shoffner, Ross Doll, Caitlin Alcorn, Ömer Kazancı, Adam Kowalski

Caitlin Alcorn
. I earned a B.S. in Food and Resource Economics from the University of Florida. While earning my undergraduate degree, I studied abroad in Nicaragua and Brazil, focusing on grassroots development and Portuguese language. After serving a year with AmeriCorps in Montgomery County, Maryland, I earned a Master’s degree in International Development and Social Change from Clark University. My primary research interests include: feminist geography, gendered divisions of labor, paid and unpaid care work, labor rights and policy, and feminist theory and epistemologies.

Robert Anderson has ten years of experience in the field of ecological restoration in the Puget Sound region. Before coming to the University of Washington, he worked in the non-profit sector as a project manager at EarthCorps, an organization dedicated to building global community through local environmental service. He also completed the certificate program in Stream Restoration from the University of Washington in 2012. Rob’s academic interests include nature-society relations in the Anthropocene, environmental justice, and political ecology of the environmental conservation and restoration movements. He graduated from Vassar College in 2005 with a B.A. in political science and music, and he currently is the lead singer and songwriter for the local rock and roll band Day Laborers & Petty Intellectuals.

Ross Doll:  BA, English, UC Berkeley; MA, China Studies, UW. Research interests: political economy and political ecology; agrarian studies; land and property rights; food systems; agricultural modernization policy and rural spatial production; regional focus: China and East Asia. My professional background includes three years as a researcher at the non-profit Landesa/Rural Development Institute; two years as the managing editor of a bilingual magazine in China; two years as a Peace Corps volunteer in Romania; and three years in publishing and arts-related journalism. Most recently I spent a year in China conducting research on agrarian change on a Fulbright grant. My hobbies and interests include fly fishing, running, Mandarin, translating, writing and gardening.

Olivia Hollenhorst
BS, Public Health: Promotion and Behavior, Oregon State University, 2014
GIS Certificate, Oregon State University, 2014
GIS in complex humanitarian emergencies; infectious disease epidemiology; data visualization
Ömer Kazancı. I grew up and studied in Istanbul, Turkey. I received my BA degrees in History & Sociology from Bogazici University. Throughout my undergraduate years, I have taken part in several NGOs and joined research projects on various urban issues including forced/voluntary migration to the city from rural areas, the destruction of sites of historical memory, and different types of segregation. This has ultimately led me to take a Master’s degree at UW backed by a grant from the Turkish Fulbright Commission. My primary research interests are in urban political economy, nature-society relations, political ecology and citizenship studies.

Rod Palmquist
BA History, University of Washington, 2008
Economic geography and social theory; workers and organized labor; global commodity chains; feminist geographies; urban geographies; welfare-states.

Edgar Sandoval. BA, Geography and Government, Dartmouth College. I grew up in Waukegan, IL and traveled eastward for college. While I initially intended to study biomedical engineering, I took an anthropology and a geography course that stirred me toward the social sciences. My research interests are in the queer geography of sexuality, the geography of racial inequities, urban space, migration, citizenship, and social movements. I’ve done research in Miami, FL, Brazil, and the Czech Republic on queer spaces, accessibility, and social movements. I’ve worked for a number of non-profits, usually specifically focusing on education and/or human rights. In grad school, I hope to be able combine my passion for both activism and research. Outside of geography, I’m known as a sedentary creature: I am an avid reader, television viewer, board gamer, and videogame player. When I’m not secluding myself indoors, I enjoy playing volleyball, exploring restaurants, visiting parks, and pondering our experience with the space around us.

Elizabeth Shoffner
BS, Architecture & Environmental Thought and Practice, University of Virginia, 2005
MA, Agroecology, Universidad de Córdoba, 2013
Agroecology and agrarian transformations (particularly in the Southern Cone of South America); neo-extractivism; political ecology; post-colonialism; identity and subjectivity

Magie Ramirez speaks to “Race, Privilege, and Food Justice” on air

Magie Ramirez, UW doctoral candidate, was recently interviewed by KPFA’s Against the Grain, a publicly funded radio show about “politics, society, and ideas.”  It aired on Aug. 26, but you can listen to the interview by clicking this article.

Magie writes:

clean_greensEarlier this month I was contacted by a producer from the Berkeley radio station KPFA who came across the article I wrote last year based on my MA thesis. To my surprise they were interested in interviewing me, and today I had the honor of taking part in the show, Against The Grain! The broadcast will air tomorrow at 12pm PT on station 94.1 for those of you in the Bay Area that are interested in listening!

The interview is on my engagements with Clean Greens, the food justice organization I worked with for several years in Seattle, the transformative power of black food geographies, and the need to think reflexively about privilege, race and power asymmetries when engaging in food justice activism.

For those of you located elsewhere, you will also be able to hear it online if you are interested .