Course Descriptions

GEOGRAPHY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, Winter, 2015
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Tracks: Cities, Citizenship & Migration (CCM); Environment, Economics & Sustainability (EES); Globalization, Health & Development (GHD); GIS, Mapping & Society (GMS)

Geog 123 Intro To Globalization (online only—extra fee Farias CCM, EES, GHD
Geog 180 Intro to Global Health Sparke GHD
Geog 258 Digital Geographies Elwood GMS, CCM, GHD
Geog 271 Geography of Food & Eating Jarosz EES, GHD
Geog 276 Intro To Political Geography Brown CCM, EES, GHD, GMS
Geog 280 Geography & Health Mayer EES, GHD
Geog 295 Living in the Borderlands: Gender, Race & Place Ybarra CCM, GHD
Geog 302 The Pacific Northwest Beyers CCM, EES
Geog 317 GIS & Stats Withers Methods, GMS
Geog 331 Poverty, Care & Responsibility Lawson CCM, GHD
Geog 335 The Developing World Piedalue CCM, EES, GHD
Geog 370 Problems in Resource Management Biermann EES,GHD
Geog 381 Mapping Health Hannah GMS, EES GHD
Geog 403 Migration & Citizenship in Europe Mitchell CCM, EES
Geog 425 Qualitative Methods Daigle methods
Geog 461/561 Urban GIS Hannah CCM, GMS
Geog 462/562 Coastal GIS Nyerges EES, GMS
Geog 472 Ecoscapes: Nature, Culture & Place Derman EES, CCM, GHD
Geog 490 The Seattle Region England CCM, EES, GHD
Geog 505 Research Seminar: Chinese Development Chan Grad research seminar
Geog 542 Research Seminar: Social & Population Geography Ybarra Grad research seminar
Geog 553 Research Seminar: Cultural Geographies Mitchell Grad research seminar
Geog 571 Research Seminar: Critical Ecologies Biermann Grad research seminar
Geog 572 Research Seminar: Queer Geographies Knopp Grad research seminar

Geog 123 (5) ONLINE ONLY CCM EES GHD
Intro to Globalization
Monica Farias

GEOG 180 (5) GHD
Intro to Global Health
Matt Sparke
TTh 8:30-10:20, plus weekly quiz section
Introduces global health by putting its contemporary definition, determinants, development and direction as a field into a broad global context. It is open to students from all disciplines. The class is divided into four core topics: i) the burden and distribution of disease and mortality; ii) the determinants of global health disparities; iii) the development of global health policies; and, iv) the outcomes of global health interventions. All are examined in relation to wider patterns of global interdependency, highlighting how both global health disparities and global health policy responses are themselves shaped by global ties and tensions. Keywords: health systems, health inequalities, global determinants of health, global health, intervention targets, neoliberalism

Geog 258 (5) CCM, GHD, GMS
Digital Geographies
Sarah Elwood
TTh 1:30-3:20, plus T ,Th or MW quiz sections
From the use of Google’s MyMaps or geo-tagged Tweets to coordinate street protests for democracy, to ‘check-in’ apps that alert when us when a friend is nearby, to online or smart-phone citizen data collection apps, making and using digital maps and geographic information is an increasing part of everyday life in many parts of the world. This class explores the key components, applications and societal impacts of contemporary geographic data and technologies, including online mapping software, handheld geographic devices, the geoweb, location-based services, crowdsourced spatial data sets, and open source geographic technologies. You will develop hands-on experience using these forms of geographic information and technologies, and develop a framework for critically assessing the digital geographies emerging through these new data, technologies, and applications.

For our purposes this quarter, “digital geographies” are the social/spatial practices and relationships produced through digital geographic data or technologies. For example, the use of Google Earth imagery by human rights activists to support court claims of genocide is a social/spatial practice that uses digital geographic technologies. The disproportionate production of multimedia geographic data with smart phones in wealthier neighborhoods, regions, and countries, compared to text-based geographic data (using SMS text messages) in poorer places is an example of a spatial/spatial relationshipthat emerges through the use of digital geographic technologies. We will study how digital geographies are produced through spatial data and geovisual representations with new technologies; and through the use of these technologies for protest/activism, recreation/socializing, community and international development, citizen participation in government, citizen science, surveillance/social control, and many other activities

Keywords: mapping, spatial technologies, social media, the internet, social justice, digital divide

GEOG 271 (5) EES, GHD
Geography of Food & Eating
Lucy Jarosz
MWF 11:30-12:20, plus Th quiz section
Food is something none of us can live without. It is essential for life, and it also shapes our environment and our relationships to other people and places. Where is our food grown and how? Where and what do we eat? How does food identify people and places? These questions are fundamentally geographic. Exploring how food is grown and consumed leads to a deeper understanding of societies and environments and their complex relationships. This course examines food production, distribution, and consumption issues across geographic scales, spanning the microcosm of the individual body to the national and global scales. We explore the political, social, cultural and economic dimensions of food and eating in particular spaces, places, environments, contexts and regions in order to introduce key concepts and modes of analysis in human geography. Keywords: food, agriculture, sustainability, globalization

Geog 276 (5) CCM EES GHD GMS
Intro to Political Geography
Michael Brown
MWF, 11:30-12:20, plus T quiz section
A basic conceptual introduction to the study of politics (broadly defined) from a geographic standpoint. We will cover key themes and debates within political geography, as well as topics and places that political geographers have researched. The course covers geopolitics, state and national politics, as well as local and micro-scale politics. By the end of this course, you will come to appreciate the benefits of a geographical imagination in the study of politics, as well as the significance of the political to the study of geography. You will have practiced how to relate theoretical and empirical phenomena to one another on your own. Through assignments you will develop basic research skills of conceptualization, data collection, analysis and representation. Keywords: politics, power, territory,

GEOG 280 (5 credits) EES GHD
Geography and Health
Jonathan Mayer
TTh 11:30 am-1:20 pm; quiz sec. M or W
Considers the relevance of geography to social issues of health and health care in the United States, other developed countries, and developing countries; the structure of health care system as social and political institutions; geographical concepts of health and disease. The course will include lectures, guest lectures, films and quiz sections. (Optional linked writing course.) Keywords: Global health, infectious disease, medical geography, health services, biopsychosocial influences on health

Geog 295 (5) CCM, GHD
Living in the Borderlands: Gender, Race and Place
Megan Ybarra
MWF, 10:30-11:20, plus Tuesday quiz section
We tend to think of borders as fixed lines that divide Us from our Others. In recent years, geographers, political scientists, poets and activists have debated the meaning of borders, focusing on borderlands as a concept that transcends physical borders between nation-states.
This class will direct scholarly inquiry towards a broad array of sources to think through living in the borderlands. We will pull out key themes from a classic feminist Chicanx text, Borderlands / La Frontera, to direct our analysis towards a relational understanding of place and identity. While the class will start with the case of the making of the US-Mexico border, we will also draw from other cases around the world in articles, movies, and podcasts. Themes include: settler colonialism and ethnic identities, bilingualism and belonging, transnationalism and diaspora, and how people make claims on gendered, raced and place identities.

GEOG 302 (3* credits) CCM EES
The Pacific Northwest
Bill Beyers
MWF 8:30-9:20 am
Settlement patterns in the Pacific Northwest, emphasizing economic and historical factors, including the location of resource-oriented industries, policies regarding the use of public lands, and bases of the development of major urban areas in the region. * Note: This is a 3-credit course; however, students wishing to write an extra paper can register for an additional 2 credits of Geog 499. See Geog advisers for details. Keywords: public lands, agriculture, forest products, high tech, historical development processes, growth management

GEOG 317 ( “additional methods” requirement), GMS
GIS and Statistics (5)
Suzanne Withers
Daily, 12:30-1:20
Provides a conceptual and practical introduction to spatial data analysis and geographic information systems in human geography. The goal is to provide a practical understanding of the application of data analysis to geographic problem solving. Emphasis is placed on the appropriate selection of methods to analyze geographic data, procedures for research design, and interpretation of results. The student will gain practical experience via weekly assignments that require the application of spatial data analysis to specific geographic research questions using SPSS and ArcMap software. Topics include descriptive and inferential methods, spatial patterns and statistics, correlation and spatial autocorrelation. Priority is given to the application and interpretation of methods, over the technical nature of these techniques. There are two main objectives to this course: comprehension and application.

Comprehension: By the end of the course students will be able to read and comprehend reports and research in Human Geography. Students will have a working knowledge of the main techniques and procedures used within the discipline, such that they can interpret and understand the literature, critically.
Application: By the end of the course students will be able to independently integrate data analysis and GIS. Students will have gained experience applying and interpreting various quantitative methods.
Other aims: 1) introduce students to the challenges of spatial data and geocoded information; 2) help students integrate geographic information science and quantitative methods; 3) help students visualize spatial distributions and variations; 4) prepare students for more advanced quantitative methods; and 5) ground students in the theoretical | methodological | substantive trilogy of geographic research

GEOG 331
Geographies of Poverty, Care & Responsibility (5) CCM, GHD
Vicky Lawson
TTh, 11:30-1:20, plus Fri quiz
Explores the causes and patterns of global poverty and links this with the urgent need for care and care ethics in our lives and in society broadly. The course connects academic inquiry on the interconnections between global poverty with the theory and practice of care ethics and caring practices through a research project or through service-learning in the community. We will examine how care work is being intensified and simultaneously devalued, we will explore the ways in which care is a public rather than a private matter and we will think about our responsibilities to care in collaboration with for those who are near and those who are across the globe. Students will learn about the possibilities and challenges of caring across distance (geographical and social) and about how to respectfully engage with people in different places. Finally, we will explore current efforts to construct alternative ways of caring for our society and our world. Learning Goals: i) understand geographical patterns and causes of global poverty; ii) learn about geographies of care in a global context; iii) conduct either a research project or service-learning/action research to think through concepts of collective responsibility to society. Keywords; Global poverty, care, care ethics.

Geog 335 (5) CCM, EES, GHD
The Developing World
Amy Piedalue
MW, 2:30-4:20
Focuses on how we might understand intensifying inequality across the globe through analyses of historical and contemporary processes of development. Our focus will be on a critical reading of development theory – looking at the production of development discourses, and the interventions and policies enacted following their logics. We will examine the historical roots of ideas and practices of development, as well as more recent trends in development thought and practice. For each school of development thought, we will pose questions about which development and whose development? Throughout the quarter, we will ask – what does a geographic approach contribute to understanding development processes? And starting from development geography, we will pose the question “what’s missing in development theory?’ with a focus on the subjects, places and scales that have been excluded from particular theorizations of development. This approach will also make visible alternative visions of development that diverge from dominant models. We will explore not only historical and contemporary trends in development, but also consider the ways in which we are all connected to and through these processes. In this, we will analyze what’s at stake in understanding important contemporary issues and a variety of ways that we might engage with them. We will think through the challenges of producing development knowledge through ethical and responsible relations that centralize the agency and voice of all participants in development processes.

Geog 370, (5) EES, GHD
Geographies of Environmental Management
Christine Biermann
MWF, 12:30-1:50
Explores the theory, politics, and practices of environmental management and conservation. Key questions include: What is environmentalism? What is the difference between conservation and preservation? Are humans a part of nature or separate from it? What are the root causes of today’s environmental problems, and how can we address them? How do environmental problems differentially impact populations, and what can we do to address such issues equitably? In answering these questions, we will explore how modern ideas about nature and environment have changed over time, and how geographers have contributed to the theories and practices of environmental conservation.
Geog 381, (5) GMS, EES, GHD
Mapping Health
Joe Hannah
MW 12:30-2:20
This is a hybrid course. Class will meet face-to-face two days in each of weeks 1, 4, 7, and 10. Balance of course will be online.
Brings together two different aspects of geographic inquiry: critical cartography and global health studies. Global health projects that involve disease surveillance, population studies, reproductive health, malnutrition, poverty alleviation, disaster response and other interventions, as well as studies of and administration of health care systems, all use various forms of maps for particular reasons and in particular ways. Through lecture, discussion, and hands-on projects, we will look behind the outward messages of global health and underneath the “taken-for-granted” authority embodied in the visual message of the map to get a more nuanced understanding of how both work toward specific ends.

Geog 403 (5) CCM EES
Migration & Citizenship in Europe
Katharyne Mitchell
TTh, 1:30-3:20
Provides a theoretical and empirical understanding of migration processes and patterns in Europe, with a focus on Muslim immigration in the post WWII period. It offers an analysis of the impact of EU mandates, globalization processes, and international, national and urban policies on Muslim immigrant integration, rights and identity formation.

Geog 425 (5) methods requirement
Qualitative Methods
Michelle Daigle
MW 2:30-4:20
Qualitative methods are important tools in Geographical research, enabling researchers to explore important issues such as human-environment relationships, the social production of space and place, and the spatial production of the social world. In this course we will introduce students to a variety of qualitative methodologies relevant to human geography based-inquiry. Fundamental to the broader research process is an understanding of how knowledge is produced, what “counts” as knowledge, and the politics of knowledge production itself. During this course, you will 1) expand and deepen your knowledge of qualitative research methodologies; 2) practice the use of qualitative research techniques; and 3) learn about and discuss current issues in qualitative methodology including research ethics, representation and positionality. Keywords: qualitative methodologies, feminist theory, ethnography, interviewing

GEOG 461 (5 credits) GMS CCM
Urban Geographic Information Systems
Joe Hannah
T Th 9:30-11:20 am; labs TTh or MW
Introduces concepts and application skills for GIS-based analysis of urban/regional issues. Includes data sources/acquisition, preparation/coding, analysis, representation, and communication. Prerequisite: 2.0 in GEOG 360; recommended: GEOG 277. Keywords: the city, GIS, spatial analysis, spatial data, urban planning and policy, access, social justice

GEOG 462 (5 credits) EES GMS
Coastal GIS
Tim Nyerges
MWF 9:30 – 10:20 lecture , plus TTH or MW labs
Geography 462/562 is an intermediate course that examines the theory and application of geographic information systems (GIS). It combines an overview of general principles of geographic information science and practical experience in the analytical processing and use of geospatial information with GIS. The lectures introduce students to the analytical treatment of geographic information using several frameworks for understanding data, software operations, and systems. The course adopts a thematic focus on coastal concerns in the Puget Sound Region. Coastal is defined as the watershed basins that drain into Puget Sound as well as the water of Puget Sound; the idea being that both raster and vector data models are treated. Over one-half the US population lives in only 17% of the land area along coasts. Several readings that support both GIS concepts and coastal concepts are made available through .pdf on a password protected web site. Students work with many of these concepts and skills in laboratory assignments, discussion sessions and a final project undertaken in student teams. Lab assignments take place in the Geography Department’s Sherman Lab (Smith 401) as hands on experience with ESRI’s ArcGIS. The lab assignments, and particularly the final project, require additional hours of work outside of the lab session according to the U of Washington guidelines that 2 hours of outside work are expected for every hour of class time. In the lecture and the labs we make use of a coastal data model developed as an integration of the ArcMarine and ArcHydro data models to investigate interaction of the terrestrial and marine environments of coastal areas. The dynamic (i.e. change) about terrestrial and marine/estuarine environments is an important underlying theme of the course. Students are expected to participate in discussion sessions on a diverse range of pertinent geographic information topics and applications. Web resources will provide lecture notes, lab assignment materials, case study materials and sources for geographic data and analysis at UW and around the world. Keywords: vulnerability assessment, watershed, measurement framework, data model, Puget Sound Partnership, GIS, coastal

Geog 472 (5) CCM, EES, GHD “W” course
Ecoscapes: Nature, Culture & Place
Brandon Derman
MW, 2:30-4:20
This course will build students’ familiarity with contemporary geographic approaches to nature-society relations, and provide opportunities to bring those perspectives to bear on issues of current environmental and social concern. We will encounter theoretical readings as well as media accounts and popular representations of “the environment,” “nature,” and the “more-than-human.” The class structure will incorporate seminar-style discussion, collaborative small group activities, and opportunities for independent, original inquiry. Written work and in-class participation will constitute the bulk of students’ graded assignments

Geog 490 (5) GHD, EES, CCM
The Seattle Region
Kim England
TTh 9:30-11:20
Capstone experience for upper-division students with previous coursework in urban geography and social science research methods. Studies how social/cultural, political, economic historical-geographies are created, sustained, or altered in urban areas, using the Seattle area as our focus. The course has two required components. Participation and leadership in a seminar-style discussion and other activities focusing on assigned readings, and a paper and online exhibit based on independent research project on the Lake Union area. One prior advanced course in qualitative or quantitative methods or research design, and one prior urban geography or inequality course is strongly recommended (Geography 310, 331, 342, 377, 378, 431, 432, 439, 445, 476, 477, 478, 479). Geography 315 is particularly recommended.

GEOG 505 (5)
Research Seminar: Chinese Development
Kam Wing Chan
M, 3:30-6:20
Aims at developing students’ perspectives for analyzing China’s spatial development. The course examines the internal dynamics of China’s spatial economy and its interaction with the outside world. The course first surveys the population and land issues in pre-modern China, followed by an examination of China’s development strategy since 1949. The main focus is on the rural-urban structure, industrialization, the spatial structure of government and the economy, land conversion and local revenue. The course draws on literature in geography and other social science disciplines. The seminar also examines the main debates in China’s current spatial development and their different viewpoints. Each student is expected to complete weekly readings, participate in presentations and discussions, and prepare a research paper (or equivalent) in relation to his or her interest areas towards the end of the course.

Geog 542, Research Seminar: Social and Population Geography
Unrecognized Refugees and Geographies of Asylum
Megan Ybarra
W, 2:30-5:20
Building from the “humanitarian crisis” of Central Americans in Mexico and the United States, this seminar will employ postcolonial, feminist and critical race theories to explore contemporary processes of migration, asylum and sovereignty.
Geog 553,Research Seminar: Cultural Geographies Katharyne Mitchell M, 2:30-5:20

GEOG 561 (5) Urban GIS
Joe Hannah
TTh 9:30-11:20, plus TTh or MW labs
See description for Geog 461. Graduate students will be expected to do additional coursework.

GEOG 562 (5) Coastal GIS Tim Nyerges MW, 12:30-2:20, plus T labs
See description for Geog 464. Graduate students will be expected to do additional coursework.

Geog 571 (5) Research Seminar: Critical Ecologies Christine Biermann Th, 2:30-5:20

Geog 572, (5) Research Seminar: Queer Geographies (5)
Larry Knopp
W, 2:30-5:20
Queer theory has infused much of the social sciences and humanities with a particular poststructuralist imagination that foregrounds issues of sexuality, erotics, and desire as interpretive lenses through which to analyze, interpret, and understand the world. This seminar provides participants an opportunity to learn about and apply queer theory to certain traditional and emerging geographic concepts and studies, including those surrounding notions of place, placelessness, space/spatiality, location, scale, the urban/rural dichotomy, and movement/flow. The emphasis in instructor-provided readings is on Anglo-American (particularly North American) contexts, but participants are welcome and encouraged to bring additional texts and perspectives to the table. Keywords: Queer, sexuality, desire, erotics, poststructuralism

rr 10/17/14

AUTUMN, 2014 Geography Courses

  • Cities, Citizenship and Migration  (CCM)
  • Environment, Economy and Sustainability  (EES)
  • GIS, Mapping and Society (GMS)
  • Globalization, Health and Development (GHD)

Course #

Course Title

Instructor

Track(s)

102 Intro to World Regions (online only) TBA CCM
123 Intro to Globalization Hannah CCM, EES, GHD
205 Our Global Environment Biermann EES
207 Economic Geography Beyers EES
230 Global Inequality Daigle CCM,  GHD
277 Intro to Cities England CCM,  GHD
295 A Introduction to Migration Mitchell CCM, EES, GHD
295 B Food & Politics In Russia Alaniz EES, GHD
310 Immigrant America Ellis CCM, EES
315 Explanation & Understanding in Geography Brown N/A
360 Principles of GIS Mapping Nyerges GHD, GMS
375 Geopolitics Hannah GHD,GMS
377 Urban Political Geography Brown CCM
425 Qualitative Methods TBA methods
435 Industrialization & Urbanization in China Chan CCM, EES, GHD
445 Geography of Housing Withers CCM, EES
482 GIS Data Management Nyerges GMS
500 History of Geographic Thought Elwood
513 Grant Proposals Ellis
525 Advanced Qualitative Methods Jarosz
580 Epidemiologic Geography Mayer
582 GIS Data Management Nyerges

Geog 123, Intro to Globalization (5)  CCM EES GHD
Joe Hannah
TTh 11:30-1:20, plus quiz sections throughout the week

Where does your food come from? Who makes your clothes? What does your bank do with your money? Who are you connected to through your work? Why was the ‘Battle in Seattle’ about more than just Seattle? How are people networking and moving around the world in new ways? How do these networks and movements change politics locally and globally? Why does increasing global interconnectedness also seem to lead to greater division and greater inequality? Why is national security said to depend on the defense of free trade and private property? How are we all connected together, and who are “we”? This course aims to help you start answering these sorts of questions by examining globalization in all its diverse forms of worldwide interconnection. Such interconnections include economic ties, political ties, cultural ties, environmental ties and media ties. These ties can be analyzed independently, but they also need to be understood in terms of how they operate in conjunction with one another to produce the overall effect that has been given the single label “globalization”. When it is talked about in this singular way, globalization often seems overpowering and unstoppable. However,  by learning about each set of ties in turn you will be able to see globalization as something less monolithic, something that is being contested and reworked, something that ties the world together in a range of both constraining and empowering ways, something that is constantly changing and something that therefore can also be changed. KEYWORDS:  globalization, neoliberalism, free trade, multinational corporations 

GEOG 205
Intro to the Physical Sciences & The Environment: Our Global Environment  (5)  EEH
Christine Biermann
MWF 12:30-1:50
We live on an extraordinary planet, yet the activities and conveniences of modern civilization often dull our sensitivity to the complex workings of the global environment. Accordingly, the objective of this course is to provide you with a broad introduction to a spectrum of dynamic knowledge about the Earth and the roles of humans upon it. Geography has a rich heritage of investigating the relationships between the natural environment and people, and this course will examine current environmental phenomena from a geographic perspective. The environmental issues we will explore vary in scale from global climate change to forest change of the Pacific Northwest, but for all issues there will be an emphasis on developing a thorough understanding of how earth systems work, and how these systems are linked to social and political economic processes. Students will learn the basic biogeophysical processes underlying environmental change, the human/social dynamics that also shape environments, the multi-scalar interactions between physical and social processes, and the broader geographic perspectives on environmental issues. Practical lab and field exercises designed to develop skills, apply concepts, and expose students to both case studies and on-the-ground research will be used as a complement to lectures. Students will be evaluated through lab and field exercises, in-class discussion of readings, three exams (two midterms and a final), and a short research paper on an environmental topic of one’s choosing. Keywords: environment, biosphere, climate, global change

GEOG 207   (5)      Economic Geography        EES
Bill Beyers
MTWF 8:30-9:20 am, plus Th quiz section

What’s where; how does it affect our lives and why?  Think about this in terms of economic activities, and you’ve got the purpose of Geography 207. This course is an introduction to and overview of economic geography: patterns, trends, and theories of the geographic arrangement and interaction of economic resources, activities, and institutions.  We’ll cover principles used to understand location and interaction at the intra-urban, interregional, and international scales.  Given this broad sweep of material, the course is relevant to students pursuing studies in geography, economics, planning, business, and regional studies. The course format entails lecture and lecture notes, assigned reading, three empirical case studies, weekly review/discussion section, two 50-minute tests and a final examination.  Your writing of the case results makes this into a Writing course.  No prerequisites — we’ll introduce economic and geographic principles as we need them.

GEOG 230  (5)    Global Inequality              CCM, GHD
Michelle Daigle
TTh 9:30-11:20 am, plus F quiz

Explores geographies of inequality around the globe.  We will discuss the connections between inequality and international development efforts with a focus on Latin America, Africa and Asia.  Our focus will be on the causes and geographic patterns of social inequality worldwide.  The course begins by reexamining some of the defining themes in debates over development: ‘overpopulation’, migration/immigration, and the production of inequality and poverty.  We discuss the historical legacies of colonialism in Africa, Latin America and Asia, linking these to current debates about ‘development’ – such as state intervention versus free markets.  We will examine global to local forces that shape inequality and will discuss working in the global economy and grassroots networks of political action.

Geog 277  Intro to Cities   CCM, GHD
Kim England
MWF, 12:30-2:20, plus Friday quiz section

A geographical survey of concepts and issues related to urbanization.  As the focus is on cities, we explore a range of topics (such as the economy, social dynamics and politics) through the urban context.  Specific topics include the evolution of American urbanization and the urban built environment; the roles of transportation, economic restructuring, politics, and urban planning in producing urban change; suburbanization and urban sprawl; inner-city gentrification; and how issues of class, race, and gender are embedded in the geographies of cities. Keywords: economic/social restructuring, housing, inequality, politics and planning, urban change.

Geog  295 Introduction to  Migration (5)  CCM, EES, GHD
Katharyne  Mitchell
MWF,  10:30-11:20
This introductory course offers an evidence-based analysis of migration that ties current migration policies and practices to broader changes in the global economy. The class provides a link between general theories of migration and their specific manifestation in migration patterns worldwide. It explores a series of themes related to contemporary migration processes including transnationalism, humanitarianism, remittances, gender, asylum, and deportation.

Geog 295 B     Special Topics: Food & Culture In Russia (5)  vlpa   ees, ghd
Jose Alaniz

Relying on the critical writings of Food Studies scholars such as Michael Pollan and others, we will consider food in the Russian context, from the Middle Ages to the post-Soviet era, delving into such matters as table manners; excess; holidays;  vegetarianism; communal dining; Soviet home economics; and hunger throughout Russian history.

Geog 310 (5)  Immigrant America   CCM, EES
Mark Ellis
TTh 11:30-1:20

Examines US immigration trends and policies from a geographic perspective. Specifically, we will explore where US immigrants come from, why they come from these places, where they settle in the US, and how their geography intersects with ideas about assimilation and national identity.  We will also discuss a variety of other issues that bear on the geography of US immigration, including the history of US immigration policy, current efforts to manage authorized and unauthorized immigration, ideas of citizenship, and disputes about the impacts of the foreign-born on the economy, society and environment of the US.  Students who finish this course will have a greater knowledge of basic facts about US immigration policy and US immigrant groups; and a solid grasp of the broader social, economic, cultural, and geographic issues that frame debates about immigration policy in this country.

GEOG 315   (5)     Explanation and Understanding in Geography    “W” course
Michael Brown
MWF 9:30-10:20, plus TTh quiz sections

The objectives of this course are fourfold:
1.) to design your own geographic research effectively,
2.) to evaluate critically the research designs of others,
3.) to develop your appreciation of how knowledge is acquired, and
4.) to prepare you for your future courses in geographic data analysis (425 and 426 for example).

By the end of this course, you will come to appreciate the diversity of methods in geography, the appropriateness of different methods for different research questions, and the standards by which each method should be evaluated. Keywords:  research, geography, social science, logic, reasoning.

GEOG 360  (5)  Principles of GIS Mapping      GHD, GMS
Tim Nyerges
MWF 10:30-11:20 am, Labs MW or TTh

Origins, development, and methods of cartography. Principles of data representation and map design for thematic mapping and spatial analysis. Introduction to principles of geographic information systems (GIS).  Keywords:  GIS, cartography, spatial analysis.

Geog 375 (5) Geopolitics   GHD  GMS
Joe Hannah
MW 1:30-3:20

Geopolitics is the practice of envisioning and representing global space in a way that reflects particular strategic interests – though these interests are not always overtly stated. Most geopolitical treatises focus on some supposedly innate, objective difference between people and places – based on religion, race, resource endowment, and so on – that presents a security threat. This course draws mostly from critical geopolitics literature that deconstructs these spatial representations, revealing their cartographic constructions and erasures and the material violences they produce. We will take a historical overview of some of the dominant geopolitical imaginations of the last 200 years, including colonial representations of ‘the Orient’, Nazi propaganda maps, the bipolar world of the Cold War discourse, and the current US-led ‘war on terror’. We will also explore the ties and tensions between contemporary geopolitics and neoliberal globalization. Keywords: geographic imaginaries, critical studies, representation, security, international relations

 GEOG 377  Urban Political Geography   CCM
Michael Brown
MW, 2:30-4:20
Examines how the spatial structure of cities and towns affects and is affected by political processes. Considers both traditional and newer forms of politics as global and local issues. Special attention paid to where politics takes place within local contexts across state, civil society, home, and the body.  Keywords: urban, politics, United States.

GEOG 425  (5)  Qualitative Methods in Geography      Methods requirement
TBA
TTh 11:30-1:20

Qualitative methods are important tools in Geographical research, enabling researchers to explore important issues such as human-environment relationships, the social production of space and place, and the spatial production of the social world. In this course we will introduce students to a variety of qualitative methodologies relevant to human geography based-inquiry.  Fundamental to the broader research process is an understanding of how knowledge is produced, what “counts” as knowledge, and the politics of knowledge production itself. During this course, you will 1) expand and deepen your knowledge of qualitative research methodologies; 2) practice the use of qualitative research techniques; and 3) learn about and discuss current issues in qualitative methodology including research ethics, representation and positionality.  Keywords: qualitative methodologies, feminist theory, ethnography, interviewing.

GEOG 435 Industrialization and Urbanization in China (5)  CCM, EES, GHD
Kam Wing Chan
TTh, 1:30-3:20
Examines the relationships between economic development and spatial development in post-1949 China. China was once held up as a model for developing countries. In this course we will examine post-1949 Chinese dual economy and society, industrialization strategy and resulting socioeconomic and spatial impacts. The course focuses on a set of related issues: industrial location, rural industrialization, the hukou system, urbanization policies, rural-urban relations, migration and urban development. Students will gain a deeper understanding the complex issues of industrialization and urbanization in a transitional economy now closely linked to the world. Prerequisite: Geog 236 or 336, or a background course on contemporary China.  Students are expected to have a basic knowledge of China.  Keywords: China, development, economics, industry, cities, migration, labor, globalization

GEOG 445  (5)  Geography of Housing   CCM  EES
Suzanne Withers
TTh 1:30-3:20
Focuses on the geography of housing, especially in the United States. Topics include: the American dream of home ownership; housing affordability and differential access to home ownership; homelessness; public housing; housing demography; residential mobility and neighborhood change, and discrimination in the housing market. Special attention is given to the recent boom and bust of the housing market. Keywords: homelessness, home ownership, discrimination, suburbanization, gated communities, race, United States

Geog 482 (5)  GIS Data Management            GMS
Tim Nyerges
MW, 12:30-1:20, plus TTh or MW lab

Examines the principles and application of geospatial database management software, including personal and enterprise geodatabase management solutions. Considers enterprise architectures for GIS relative to organizational size. Addresses collaborative uses of  Internet, Intranet and Extranet architectures.  Offers case studies in database management, with a variety of dataset types and sizes.

GEOG 500  (5)   Contemporary Geographic Thought
Sarah Elwood
M 2:30-5:20 pm

Historical development of modern geography. Emphasis on various philosophical and methodological debates in geography and the contexts from which they emerged. Investigates geography’s foundational concepts and institutions; how they have responded to — and influenced — the world around them

Geog 513, (5)  Grant Proposals
Mark Ellis
W, 2:30-5:20
Students will learn about how to write a compelling proposal. This requires having a good idea with a clearly defined research question or questions that can be understood by researchers not necessarily in your subfield, explaining why the project has intellectual merit and what its broader impacts may be, embedding the research in relevant theory/background literature, having a coherent and manageable research plan that explains as much as possible about how and where you will get your data and how you will analyze it in a manner that will answer your research questions. The process also involves developing a budget, navigating the university and agency maze of forms and approvals, and initiating the process of human subjects approval.   Although the course will be geared to writing NSF style proposals the template of content and forms I will use are applicable to many other federal agencies and private foundations. The course is most suitable for geography students who already have a well-developed idea and want to fashion it into a proposal.  It is not a course designed to generate or flesh out new ideas.  At the end of the term students will have completed a proposal ready to submit to an agency.  I will assign grades based on the quality of this proposal.

Geog 525, Advanced Qualitative Methods
Lucy Jarosz
Th, 2:30-5:20
The purpose of this seminar is to expand and deepen your knowledge about qualitative research methodology and methods in human geography.  We will discuss human subjects approval processes, linking methods to research questions, ethnography, participatory action research, archival research and forms of interviewing such as life histories, focus groups and one on one interviews.  We will conclude with readings and discussion about analysis, interpretation, and presentation of your research in writing, speaking and visuals.  You will prepare for, conduct, and transcribe an interview as part of the seminar.  Requirements for the seminar include short weekly essays, three methods exercises, an oral presentation and a final essay.

Geog 560(5)    Principles of GIS Mapping
Tim Nyerges
MW, 10:30-11:20, plus either MW or TTh labs
. Graduate students only. For description, see Geog 360.

GEOG 580 (5)  Epidemiologic Geography
Jonathan Mayer
Th,  2:30-5:20 pm

Offered jointly with HSERV 586A
Explores the major theories, methods, and debates of this highly interdisciplinary field. Based upon readings, lectures, and class discussions, students gain a broad acquaintance with the field. This can serve either as a basis for research in medical geography, or as an introduction to a medical social science in light of other traditions of geography, social science, and public health. Medical geography is inherently a health-related field of geography and  social science and a subdiscipline of public health.

Geog 582 (5)    GIS Data Management
Tim Nyerges
MW, 12:30-2:20 plus either T or Th lab
. Graduate students only. For description, see Geog 482.

Version 1.1    R. Roth          4/21/14

*****************************************************

Geography, Spring, 2014 course descriptions

  • Cities, Citizenship and Migration  (CCM)
  • Environment, Economy and Sustainability  (EES)
  • GIS, Mapping and Society (GMS)
  • Globalization, Health and Development (GHD)

Geog 102 (online)

 

CCM

 

 

Geog 123 (online)

GHD

CCM

EES

 

Geog 236

GHD

 

EES

 

Geog 277

GHD

CCM

 

 

Geog  301

 

CCM

EES

 

Geog 315-required for all majors

 

 

 

 

Geog 326—meets “additional methods” requirement

 

 

 

 

Geog 342

GHD

CCM

EES

 

Geog 360

GHD

 

EES

GMS

Geog 370

GHD

 

EES

 

Geog 371

GHD

 

EES

 

Geog 380

GHD

 

EES

 

Geog 432

GHD

CCM

 

 

Geog 439

 

CCM

EES

 

Geog 458

 

 

 

GMS

Geog 469

 

 

 

GMS

Geog 474

GHD

 

EES

 

Geog 490

GHD

CCM

EES

GMS

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________


 For online course information, check here:

 http://www.pce.uw.edu/search.aspx?q=geog+200&num=10&start=0

 Geog 102, Regional Geographies (5)   CCM
Katie Gillespie
ONLINE ONLY

Geog 123, Intro to Globalization (5)  GHD, CCM, EES
Will Buckingham
ONLINE ONLY

This course aims to help you explore and answer questions about both the material ways in which the world is becoming increasingly integrated and interdependent and about all the political hype and anxiety about what these global ties imply for policy-making — particularly about how and whether policy should be made more “market-friendly” or, as the critics would have it, “market-fundamentalist” and “neoliberal.”  When it is talked about in a singular way, globalization often seems overpowering, inevitable, and unstoppable. The first part of the course addresses how the term “Globalization” is often used like this in political speech in order to achieve particular political goals. However, by learning about some of the ties connecting the world together more tightly, you will be able to see globalization as something less monolithic, something that is being contested and reworked, something that ties the world together in a range of both constraining and empowering ways, something that is constantly changing, and something that therefore can also be changed.

GEOG 277 (5) CCM  GHD
The Geography of Cities
MWF, 9:30-10:20, plus Th quiz section
Larry Knopp
This course explores the rich complex of material forms, processes, and meanings that we call “cities” and “urbanization”.  It does so from a distinctly geographical perspective, meaning that the subject matter is viewed through the lenses of space, place, and environment Particular emphasis is given to the origins and growth of cities and urban systems; the dynamics of capitalist urbanization; urban politics, planning, and governance; urban lives and cultures; the economic and social geographies of cities; commercial and neighborhood change; architecture and design; and the myriad contemporary and future challenges facing cities and urban systems. While focused primarily on North America, the course touches on other parts of the world as well. Keywords: urbanization, urban systems, urban cultures, economic & social change, politics & planning.

GEOG 301, Cultural Geography  (5)   CCM  EES
Ryan Burns
TTh, 9:30-11:20
This course delves into how the idea of “culture” comes to be embedded in everyday geographies, and then shapes lived experiences. We will consider multiple theoretical lenses for looking at the ways in which cultures are constructed, maintained, and contested through space- and place-making processes. Geographers look at “culture” to understand the ways these geographies are used as tools of inclusion or exclusion, as sites for resistance, and sites for power relations. We will look at many perspectives on how this happens and critically examine the effects of these processes.
Technology increasingly plays a major role in the making of cultural geographies, and is a common medium through which spaces and places are experienced. In this course we will consider many conceptual lenses, but ground those lenses in our experiences with spatial technologies. The course will consider “apps,” “crowdsourcing,” “digital humanitarianism,” and “smart cities,” among other new ways cultural geographies are produced and encountered in our everyday lives. Keywords: social justice, political geography, technology, economic geography, inequality

Student learning goals: Students will develop conceptual tools for critically examining how “culture” operates and is constructed through space and place. They will how their lives and surrounding landscapes fit into broader flows of power, resistance, and identity-making. Students will develop their research, analysis, synthesis, and writing skills through building a literature review of a topic within “cultural geography.” They will learn the many lenses through which geographers interrogate the concept of “culture,” as a subfield of human geography.

General method of instruction: Participatory and engaged — students will actively engage each other and the professor in the classroom. Brief lectures, when appropriate or necessary. A few off-campus site visits will be required. Assigned readings from a textbook. An occasional film.

Class assignments and grading. One 10-12 page literature review. Multiple self-reflective writing exercises. In-class participation. Off-campus site visits. Grades will be assigned based upon student participation and completion of in-class and take-home writing assignments. In-class writing assignments will be evaluated on effort and attention, while take-home writing assignments will be evaluated on focus, content, organization, and presentation.


GEOG 326 (5) METHODS requirement
Quantitative Methods in Geography
Kam Wing Chan
MWF, 11:30-12:50, plus W quiz section
This is an introduction to quantitative methods in geography with a focus on, but not limited to, statistical techniques. Through this course, students will develop an understanding of basic concepts, reasoning and procedures in quantitative methods used in geography. Topics covered include basic descriptive statistics, sampling, inference statistics, and correlation. The course helps develop skills in using and analyzing statistical data in the broader context of geographic applications and research.  Keywords: statistics, methods, analysis, research

GEOG 342, GEOGRAPHIES OF INEQUALITY (5)
Kim England
TTh, 1:30-3:20
What roles do poverty and social/economic polarization play in capitalist societies such as the USA?  Why are certain groups ‘excluded’ from ‘mainstream’ social life?  Why is there uneven access to jobs? housing? education?  These questions, among others are addressed in this course.  Particular emphasis is placed on the US experience, although examples are drawn from other regions of the world, especially Canada and the UK. Prerequisites: Must be of sophomore standing or higher. Social Science background recommended, some Geography background recommended. Keywords: inequality, poverty, wealth, exclusion, social justice, diversity, social/economic restructuring

 GEOG 360  (5)     GHD,  GMS
Principles of GIS Mapping
Joe Hannah
MWF 11:30-12:20  Labs MW or TTh
This class introduces students to the methods of making maps using geographic information systems (GIS) and to the basics of cartography that go into making those maps. Using both cartographic theory and practical approaches, this course focuses on principles of data representation and map design for thematic mapping. Students will complete hands-on assignments throughout the quarter to gain experience using GIS, making a number of different kinds of thematic maps.  No prior GIS experience is necessary, but this course assumes students are familiar with using personal computers, particularly with the Microsoft Windows operating system.

Geog 370 (5)   EES  GHD
Problems in Resource Management
Craig ZumBrunnen
MW, 12:30-2:20
Intended  to help students become more effective participants in environmental decision making as citizens and professionals.  Students can expect to learn about: 1) basic economic concepts as applied to natural resource management; 2) a survey history of American resource use controversies and practices; 3) a critical review of the methods/tools of benefit-cost analysis including risk analysis; 4) major ecosystem concepts and processes; 5) natural and human processes associated with water, air usage and pollution; 6) natural (e.g., thermodynamic) and human-economic processes and problems bearing on local, national and global energy use; 7) the strengths and shortcomings of various strategies and policies for environmental and resource protection; and 8) some appreciation for the complexities involved in the controversies surrounding the concept(s) of “sustainable development.” The primary methods of instruction which will be employed include: 1) lecture and class discussions, 2) 3CM and other group experiential learning processes, 3) small group activities and issue debates, 4) introduction to benefit-cost & cost-effective analyses, and 5) possibly some videos and short field trips.  It should be strongly emphasized that the purpose and perspective of this course is as much to develop critical thinking and questioning skills as it is to convey a specific body of information. Accordingly, expect this class to generate more questions than answers.  You should take this course if you are interested in an environmental career, or simply want to be a more informed citizen. Keywords: ecosystems, environment, economics.

GEOG 380  (“W” Course)  (5)   EES, GHD
Geographic Patterns of Health
Jonathan Mayer
TTh, 11:30-1:20, plus W quiz sections

Geography of infectious and chronic diseases at local, national, and international scales; environmental, biological, cultural, and social explanations of those variations. Special emphasis is given to the social, cultural, epidemiologic and  geographic issues surrounding HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, waterborne diseases, and urban slum health, as well as the issues surrounding the neglected tropical diseases a (NTDs), which have moved to the forefront of public policy, epidemiologic research, and vaccine/medication development. Finally, we will study the coexistence of infectious diseases and chronic diseases in developing countries, leading to a reconsideration of whether there is such a phenomenon of the “epidemiologic transition” in contemporary societies. Much of the reading and discussion is of rapidly developing research that has just recently emerged, and we will read and consider this research, rather than read “about” the research.

Geog 432 (5)  CCM  EES
Geographies and Politics of Poverty and Privilege
Vicky Lawson
TTh 11:30-1:20

Investigates relational poverty knowledge through research linked with community engagement.  The course investigates geographies of engagement and spaces through which poverty/privilege/inequality become politicized.  Topics include: relational poverty knowledge; grounded neoliberalisms and inequality across the Americas; spatially varied forms of poverty governance; theories of encounter and radical contact; and forms of poverty politics.  Students will be involved in grounded engagements with poverty and inequality both through service-learning and activities with actors involved in the production of poverty knowledge and politics from across the Americas.  Students will also learn about inclusive models of learning such as transformative pedagogy and South-North learning.  A goal of this class is to move beyond critique towards ethically engaged action.   Keywords: poverty privilege, care ethics.

GEOG 439 (5)  CCM, EES
Geography of Employment
Becky Burnett
MW, 1:30-3:20

Designed to help students think critically about the intersections between race, ethnicity, gender and labor in the United States.  Asks students to explore the ways in which identity, political economy, and space come together to create different patterns and relationships in terms of labor.   While there will be a strong focus on analyses of labor from a geographical perspective, attention will also be given to scholars outside of geography and outside of mainstream academia.  Students will begin the course with a theoretical overview of the debates, conceptualizations, and constructions of labor, race, gender, and class.  Next, the course will focus specifically on case studies, approaches and policies that have influenced the empirical landscape of labor in the U.S. in the past century.  Finally, we will turn toward alternatives to current interpretations of labor and work both in terms of theory and material practices.

GEOG 458 A (5) GMS
Advanced Digital Geographies
Luke Bergmann
WF, 10:30-12:20

What differences can living in a digital age of rapid change make to what we offer to the world as geographers? In this course, we will look to the future and explore what might be possible when critical geographic thought meets new digital method.

You will leave this course empowered, not only with defined skills that will be important to many emerging jobs, but also with flexible skills and critical intellectual vision needed to create—differently. So, for example, we will begin with the basics of learning to program in Python and use Python scripting to expand and deepen what is possible within ArcGIS. But we will then leave the solitary desktop and travel into the societies of the web, where GIS, geovisualization and geographic thought are being redistributed, remixed, and mashed up among new networks of people and computers. We will have gentle introductions to server GIS approaches, HTML, CSS, ways of distilling data out of the digital traces of the Internet, new interactive web mapping frameworks, and how these all integrate (or not) with what you have already learned in desktop-centered GIS paradigms. A final, collaborative project allows you to use the tools you have learned to compare and contrast objective and subjective approaches to interactive cartography while researching a topic of interest to you.

This will be a very “hands-on” and interactive course! Most of our time will be spent in a hybrid lecture/lab where we will be working together. Although there will be some individual written reflections and analyses, there will not be a formal written final exam. Labs, exercises, and the final project will request and reward compelling, collaborative creativity. Along the way, the readings will include both applied and theoretical selections. You will learn not only how people have been visualizing and programming, but also about how critical social theorists have identified assumptions, ideologies, and rigidities in existing practices that can help us figure out how to do things differently.

Having completed GEOG 360 (or received written permission from Prof. Bergmann) is a prerequisite for this course. Of course, those having and/or pursuing technical knowledge are likely to enjoy it. But 458 should also be of interest (and be accessible!) to budding critical human geographers who have taken GEOG 360 but who really haven’t seen how GIS can work with the approaches that they have been exploring in their other human geography classes. If you have any questions, please do contact me (Professor Bergmann: geoglrb@uw.edu

Geog 469, GIS Workshop  (5)  GMS
Tim Nyerges
T Th 11:30-1:20

As the capstone experience in our GIS curriculum, the goal of this course is for you to become an independent and effective GIS user who can develop and use GIS databases for spatial analysis and problem solving, meeting the needs of project partners. The course is an intensive workshop that involves hands-on experience in which student teams will develop GIS analysis and applications in collaboration with local partners (who may be from the University, community agencies, or local government). You will be involved in a range of tasks associated with GIS application: working with your team members and project partners to identify project goals, acquiring and preparing spatial data for GIS analysis, communicating with clients to assess progress, managing spatial data, and producing necessary maps and analyses. In lecture and readings, we will examine GIS project management strategies (in a variety of organizational and application contexts), and concepts and skills for data acquisition, data preparation, and database design. Please note: To enroll in this course, Geography 462 or 461 required (or equivalent GIS experience) Qualified non-geography majors should email rroth@uw.edu. to get on waiting list.

GEOG 474 (5)    EES, GHD
Geography & The Law
Brandon Derman
MW, 11:00-12:50

Explores the intersections of law, geography, and society. Topics include social and environmental justice, political power and activism, and the construction of legal norms in the international context.  The course is structured as a seminar, emphasizing discussion and written work engaged with a set of key readings.  Keywords: social justice, environmental justice, law, political geography, power, activism, the transnational

GEOG 490 (6)   CCM, EES ,GHD,GMS
The Seattle Region
Sarah Elwood
TTh, 9:30-11:20
This class is designed as a capstone experience for upper-division students with previous coursework in urban geography and/or social science research methods. We study how social/cultural, political and economic difference are created, sustained, or altered in urban areas, using the Seattle area as our focus. The class will involve seminar discussion and other activities focusing on readings from a student-curated course reader, and an independent research project in a neighborhood of your choice. There is no prerequisite but at least one prior advanced course in qualitative methods, research design, urban geography or inequality is strongly recommended, particularly Geography 315, 331, 342, 377, 378, 432, 476, 479. Keywords:
  cities; social difference, inequalities.

Geog 511 (5)
Research Design
Michael Brown
M, 12:30-3:20
This is an introduction to the design and methodology of social-science research in Geography.  It focuses particularly on the design, set-up, and internal consistency in a geographic research project.  It covers both scientific and interpretive epistemologies.  Topics typically include: the nature and process of social research, literature reviews, conceptualization operationalization and measurement, sampling strategies, experiments and models, surveying, ethnography and qualitative interviewing, archival and unobtrusive research, and the ethics and politics of research.  The course is specifically geared towards graduate students in Geography.

 Geog 541
Research Seminar: Feminist Geography (5)
Kim England
W, 2:30-5:20

Geog 553 (5)
Research Seminar: Advanced Topics In Cultural Geography: Rural and Non-Metropolitan Critical Place Studies
Larry Knopp   Th, 2:30-5:20
Critical place studies entail delving deeply into the material, symbolic, and environmental processes that produce culturally meaningful “places”.  Making sense of the interplay between broad structural forces and the messiness of everyday life in situ is key to such studies.  This seminar provides participants an opportunity to learn about and apply theories and methods of critical place studies in distinctly rural and nonmetropolitan contexts.  The emphasis in instructor-provided readings will be on Anglo-American (particularly North American) contexts, but participants are welcome and encouraged to bring additional texts and perspectives to the table.

Geog 560, Geog 569—see Geog 360 & 469 descriptions.

Version 1

2/4/14

rr

 Geography Courses

Winter, 2014

Geog 123 Intro to Globalization (online only) Buckingham CCM, EES, GHD
Geog 180 Intro to Global Health Sparke GHD
Geog 258 Digital Geographies Elwood CCM, GHD, GMS
Geog 270 Development & The Environment Bergmann EES, GHD
Geog 271 Geography of Food & Eating Jarosz EES, GHD
Geog 276 Intro To Political Geography Brown CCM, EES, GHD
Geog 280 Geography & Health Mayer EES, GHD
Geog 302 The Pacific Northwest Beyers CCM, EES
Geog 317 GIS & Stats Withers Methods, GMS
Geog 331 Poverty, Care & Responsibility Lawson CCM, GHD
Geog 381 Mapping Health Hannah EES GHD, GMS
Geog 431 Geography and Gender Burnett CCM, GHD
Geog 461/561 Urban GIS Hannah CCM, GMS
Geog 462/562 Coastal GIS Nyerges EES, GMS
Geog 495 Geographies of Climate Change ZumBrunnen CCM, EES, GHD
Geog 505 Research Seminar: Chinese Development Chan Grad research seminar
Geog 542 Research Seminar: Social & Population Geography Lawson Grad methods course
Geog 571 Research  Seminar: Critical Ecologies Bergmann Grad research seminar
Geog 572 Research Seminar: Theorizing Cities Elwood Grad research seminar

GEOG 123 (online only—extra course fees)   CCM,  EES, GHD
Will Buckingham

This course aims to help you explore and answer questions about both the material ways in which the world is becoming increasingly integrated and interdependent and about all the political hype and anxiety about what these global ties imply for policy-making — particularly about how and whether policy should be made more “market-friendly” or, as the critics would have it, “market-fundamentalist” and “neoliberal.”  When it is talked about in a singular way, globalization often seems overpowering, inevitable, and unstoppable. The first part of the course addresses how the term “Globalization” is often used like this in political speech in order to achieve particular political goals. However, by learning about some of the ties connecting the world together more tightly, you will be able to see globalization as something less monolithic, something that is being contested and reworked, something that ties the world together in a range of both constraining and empowering ways, something that is constantly changing, and something that therefore can also be changed.

 

GEOG 180 (5)
Intro to Global Health
Matt Sparke
TTh 8:30-10:20, plus weekly quiz section

Introduces global health by putting its contemporary definition, determinants, development and direction as a field into a broad global context.  It is open to students from all disciplines. The class is divided into four  core topics: i) the burden and distribution of disease and mortality; ii)  the determinants of global health disparities; iii) the development of global  health policies; and, iv) the outcomes of global health interventions. All  are examined in relation to wider patterns of global interdependency, highlighting  how both global health disparities and global health policy responses are  themselves shaped by global ties and tensions.  Keywords: health systems, health inequalities, global determinants of health, global health, intervention targets, neoliberalism

 

Geog 258 Digital Geographies  (5)  CCM, GHD, GMS
Sarah Elwood
TTh 1:30-3:20, plus T or Th quiz section

From the use of Google’s MyMaps or geo-tagged Tweets to coordinate street protests for democracy, to ‘check-in’ apps that alert when us when a friend is nearby, to online or smart-phone citizen data collection apps, making and using digital maps and geographic information is an increasing part of everyday life in many parts of the world. This class explores the key components, applications and societal impacts of contemporary geographic data and technologies, including online mapping software, handheld geographic devices, the geoweb, location-based services, crowdsourced spatial data sets, and open source geographic technologies. You will develop hands-on experience using these forms of geographic information and technologies, and develop a framework for critically assessing the digital geographies emerging through these new data, technologies, and applications.

For our purposes this quarter, “digital geographies” are the social/spatial practices and relationships produced through digital geographic data or technologies. For example, the use of Google Earth imagery by human rights activists to support court claims of genocide is a social/spatial practice that uses digital geographic technologies. The disproportionate production of multimedia geographic data with smart phones in wealthier neighborhoods, regions, and countries, compared to text-based geographic data (using SMS text messages) in poorer places is an example of a spatial/spatial relationship that emerges through the use of digital geographic technologies. We will study how digital geographies are produced through spatial data and geovisual representations with new technologies; and through the use of these technologies for protest/activism, recreation/socializing, community and international development, citizen participation in government, citizen science, surveillance/social control, and many other activities

 Keywords: mapping, spatial technologies, social media, the internet, social justice, digital divide

 

Geog 270 (5)   EES  GHD
Geographies of International Development & the Environment
Luke Bergmann
MWF 9:30-10:20, plus Th quiz section

How is your life linked to lives and environments in distant parts of the world? What might international development mean? This course takes a concrete and introductory approach to exploring large, abstract questions. We will explore some ways in which development in different areas (such as China, Africa, or the US) may be connected—both among themselves and to certain global environmental concerns: water, oil, or carbon, for example. Along the way, other questions might come up: How do ideas differ about development? In practice, who wins and who loses? Can we respond to contemporary economic and ecological crises by rethinking development, environment and their connections?  Keywords: Development, Environment, Climate, Global Environmental Change, Globalization

GEOG 271      (5)    EES, GHD
Geography of Food & Eating
Lucy Jarosz
MWF 12:30-1:20,  plus Th quiz section

Food is something none of us can live without.  It is essential for life, and it also shapes our environment and our relationships to other people and places.  Where is our food grown and how?  Where and what do we eat?  How does food identify people and places?   These questions are fundamentally geographic.  Exploring how food is grown and consumed leads to a deeper understanding of societies and environments and their complex relationships.  This course examines food production, distribution, and consumption issues across geographic scales, spanning the microcosm of the individual body to the national and global scales.  We explore the political, social, cultural and economic dimensions of food and eating in particular spaces, places, environments, contexts and regions in order to introduce key concepts and modes of analysis in human geography. Keywords:  food, agriculture, sustainability, globalization

 Geog 276  (5)   CCM   EES  GHD
Michael Brown
MWF, 11:30-12:20, plus T quiz section

A basic conceptual introduction to the study of politics (broadly defined) from a geographic standpoint.  We will cover key themes and debates within political geography, as well as topics and places that political geographers have researched.  The course covers geopolitics, state and national politics, as well as local and micro-scale politics.  By the end of this course, you will come to appreciate the benefits of a geographical imagination in the study of politics, as well as the significance of the political to the study of geography.  You will have practiced how to relate theoretical and empirical phenomena to one another on your own.  Through assignments you will develop basic research skills of conceptualization, data collection, analysis and representation. Keywords:  politics, power, territory,

 GEOG 280      (5 credits)   EES   GHD
Geography and Health
Jonathan Mayer
TTh 11:30 am-1:20 pm; quiz sec. M or W

Considers the relevance of geography to social issues of health and health care in the United States, other developed countries, and developing countries; the structure of health care system as social and political institutions; geographical concepts of health and disease. The course will include lectures, guest lectures, films and quiz sections. (Optional linked writing course.)  Keywords: Global health, infectious disease, medical geography, health services, biopsychosocial influences on health

GEOG 302              (3* credits)   CCM   EES
The Pacific Northwest
Bill Beyers
MWF 8:30-9:20 am

Settlement patterns in the Pacific Northwest, emphasizing economic and historical factors, including the location of resource-oriented industries, policies regarding the use of public lands, and bases of the development of major urban areas in the region.  * Note: This is a 3-credit course; however, students wishing to write an extra paper can register for an additional 2 credits of Geog 499. See Geog advisers for details. Keywords:  public lands, agriculture, forest products, high tech, historical development processes, growth management

 GEOG 317  ( “additional methods” requirement), GMS
GIS and Statistics (5)
Suzanne Withers
Daily, 10:30-11:20

Provides a conceptual and practical introduction to spatial data analysis and geographic information systems in human geography. The goal is to provide a practical understanding of the application of data analysis to geographic problem solving. Emphasis is placed on the appropriate selection of methods to analyze geographic data, procedures for research design, and interpretation of results. The student will gain practical experience via weekly assignments that require the application of spatial data analysis to specific geographic research questions using SPSS and ArcMap software. Topics include descriptive and inferential methods, spatial patterns and statistics, correlation and spatial autocorrelation. Priority is given to the application and interpretation of methods, over the technical nature of these techniques. There are two main objectives to this course: comprehension and application.

Comprehension: By the end of the course students will be able to read and comprehend reports and research in Human Geography.   Students will have a working knowledge of the main techniques and procedures used within the discipline, such that they can interpret and understand the literature, critically.

Application: By the end of the course students will be able to independently integrate data analysis and GIS. Students will have gained experience applying and interpreting various quantitative methods.

As well the course aims to: 1) introduce students to the distinct challenges of spatial data and geocoded information; 2) help students integrate geographic information science and quantitative methods;  3) help students visualize spatial distributions and variations; 4) prepare students for the study of more advanced quantitative methods; and 5) ground students in the theoretical | methodological | substantive trilogy of geographic research

GEOG 331
Geographies of Poverty, Care & Responsibility (5)  CCM, GHD
Vicky Lawson
TTh, 11:30-1:20, plus Fri quiz

Explores the causes and patterns of global poverty and links this with the urgent need for care and care ethics in our lives and in society broadly.  The course connects academic inquiry on the interconnections between global poverty with the theory and practice of care ethics and caring practices through a research project or through service-learning in the community.  We will examine how care work is being intensified and simultaneously devalued, we will explore the ways in which care is a public rather than a private matter and we will think about our responsibilities to care for those who are near and those who are across the globe.  Students will learn about the possibilities and challenges of caring across distance (geographical and social) and about how to respectfully engage with people in different places.  Finally, we will explore current efforts to construct alternative ways of caring for our society and our world.  Learning Goals: i) understand geographical patterns and causes of global poverty; ii) learn about geographies of care in a global context; iii) conduct either a research project or service-learning/action research to think through concepts of collective responsibility to society. Keywords; Global poverty, care, care ethics, responsibility. 

Geog 381, Mapping Health  EES, GHD, GMS
Joe Hannah
MW 12:30-2:20

This is a hybrid course. Class will meet face-to-face two days in each of weeks 1, 4, 7, and 10. Balance of course will be online.

Brings together two different aspects of geographic inquiry: critical cartography and global health studies. Global health projects that involve disease surveillance, population studies, reproductive health, malnutrition, poverty alleviation, disaster response and other interventions, as well as studies of and administration of health care systems, all use various forms of maps for particular reasons and in particular ways. Through lecture, discussion, and hands-on projects, we will look behind the outward messages of global health and underneath the “taken-for-granted” authority embodied in the visual message of the map to get a more nuanced understanding of how both work toward specific ends.

This is a “theory-based” class. By that I don’t mean it will all be “theoretical” as opposed to “practical.” On the contrary, I hope the skills you learn will be quite practical in all aspects of your life (not just in Geography). By “theory-based” I mean that we will be using critical theory (including Feminist theory, critical cartography, semiotics, and discourse theory) to look “under the hood” at interests, strategies, and worldviews that are employed in both global health and cartographic practice, and how these materially affect different policies and outcomes.

In other words, if we are successful, you will come away from this course with a better understanding of various arguments about global health, and how maps are used to make and challenge those arguments.

The emphasis of this class is less on learning “facts,” and more on learning concepts and ways of looking at claims that help us understand how power and politics are deployed toward specific ends. It is not only “what we know” that is important, but also “how we know it.” Knowledge itself is contingent and contested.

Geog 431, Geography and Gender (5)  CCM, GHD
Becky Burnett
MW 1:30-3:20

Examines theories and case studies across international, national, and regional scales in order to illustrate the impacts of social and economic processes upon the construction of gender in particular places

GEOG 461      (5 credits)  GMS  CCM
Urban Geographic Information Systems
Joe Hannah
T Th 9:30-11:20 am; labs TTh or MW

Introduces concepts and application skills for GIS-based analysis of urban/regional issues. Includes data sources/acquisition, preparation/coding, analysis, representation, and communication. Prerequisite: 2.0 in GEOG 360; recommended: GEOG 277. Keywords: the city, GIS, spatial analysis, spatial data, urban planning and policy, access, social justice

 

GEOG 462 (5 credits)   EES  GMS
Coastal GIS
Tim Nyerges
MWF 9:30 – 10:20  lecture , plus TTH or MW labs

Geography 462/562 is an intermediate course that examines the theory and application of geographic information systems (GIS). It combines an overview of general principles of geographic information science and practical experience in the analytical processing and use of geospatial information with GIS. The lectures introduce students to the analytical treatment of geographic information using several frameworks for understanding data, software operations, and systems. The course adopts a thematic focus on coastal concerns in the Puget Sound Region. Coastal is defined as the watershed basins that drain into Puget Sound as well as the water of Puget Sound; the idea being that both raster and vector data models are treated. Over one-half the US population lives in only 17% of the land area along coasts. Several readings that support both GIS concepts and coastal concepts are made available through .pdf on a password protected web site. Students work with many of these concepts and skills in laboratory assignments, discussion sessions and a final project undertaken in student teams. Lab assignments take place in the Geography Department’s Sherman Lab (Smith 401) as hands on experience with ESRI’s ArcGIS. The lab assignments, and particularly the final project, require additional hours of work outside of the lab session according to the U of Washington guidelines that 2 hours of outside work are expected for every hour of class time. In the lecture and the labs we make use of a coastal data model developed as an integration of the ArcMarine and ArcHydro data models to investigate interaction of the terrestrial and marine environments of coastal areas. The dynamic (i.e. change) about terrestrial and marine/estuarine environments is an important underlying theme of the course.  Students are expected to participate in discussion sessions on a diverse range of pertinent geographic information topics and applications.  Web resources will provide lecture notes, lab assignment materials, case study materials and sources for geographic data and analysis at UW and around the world. Keywords: vulnerability assessment, watershed, measurement framework, data model, Puget Sound Partnership, GIS, coastal

 GEOG 495 (5)   Special Topics: Geographies of Climate Change  CCM  EES
Craig ZumBrunnen
TTh, 1:30-3:20

What does science tell us about climate change?  How are we to evaluate various degrees of ominousness in differing climate forecast? How is the media reporting the issue?  How does climate change play out politically and economically, globally and locally?  What can we do about it? Through readings, lectures, films, class discussions, fieldtrips to alternative energy sites, and interactive class “games and experiential” processes, we will explore the science, history, controversies, and forecasts surrounding climate change.  Likely readings:  John Houghton’s 4th edition of Global Warming could provide an overall briefing on climate change. To aid us in “understanding the forecast” we could make use of David Archer’s Global Warming, 2nd edition. The Global Warming Reader, edited by Bill McKibben, could serve as a guide for a historical, scientific and political perspective on climate change and global warming.  Andrew Dessler and Edward Parson’s paperback is a guide to the debate over The Science and Politics of Global Climate Change. Maxwell T. Boykoff’s Who Speaks for the Climate? may be used to make sense of media reporting on climate change.  Questions of the interactions of oil, water and climate will be explored.  Brian Stone, Jr.’s The City and the Coming Climate may serve as an entry to discussions of climate change in the places we live.  The course grade will be based on two take-home essay exams, both will provide students with optional choices of questions to address.

 

 

GEOG 505 (5)
Research Seminar: Chinese Development
Kam Wing Chan
M, 3:30-6:20

A graduate seminar focusing on several major spatial topics critical to present-day China’s development. These topics include population and land relationship, the spatial structures of economic activities and governments, rural-urban relations and transition, central-local relations, the hukou system, population and social mobility, and urban centers. Emphasis will be on theory and paradigms (“the China Model”), plus research and data skills, and current development issues in China.  The course draws on literature in geography, and other social science disciplines. Each student is expected to complete weekly readings, participate in presentations and discussions, and submit a research paper (or a research proposal) in relation to his or her interest areas at the end of the course.

Geog 542, Research Seminar: Social and Population Geography
Vicky Lawson
M, 2:30-5:20

Explores relational poverty, class politics, spaces of encounter, and alliance politics.  The course will examine contemporary and historical poverty knowledges and the geographical/political-economic contexts in which they emerge.  We rethink poverty knowledge and practice through the lens of relational poverty theory.  We will read a diverse range of case studies (drawing from network researchers) that engage innovative approaches to rethinking poverty in relation to social differences and in rural and urban places.  The seminar engages with the activities of the relational poverty network (RPN).  The RPN is an international, interdisciplinary and collaborative network of poverty scholars committed to expanding poverty research beyond authoritative poverty knowledge.  Convenes with Geog 578.  Students can enroll in either seminar.

GEOG 561 (5)
Urban GIS
Joe Hannah

See description for Geog 461. Graduate students will be expected to do extra coursework.

 

GEOG 562 (5)
Coastal GIS
Tim Nyerges
MW, 12:30-2:20, plus T labs

See description for Geog 464. Graduate students will be expected to do additional coursework.

 

Geog 571 (5)
Research Seminar: Critical Ecologies
Luke Bergmann

 Geog 578,  Research Seminar: Theorizing Cities (5)
Sarah Elwood
M, 2:30-5:20

Explores relational poverty, class politics, spaces of encounter, and alliance politics.  The course will examine contemporary and historical poverty knowledges and the geographical/political-economic contexts in which they emerge.  We rethink poverty knowledge and practice through the lens of relational poverty theory.  We will read a diverse range of case studies (drawing from network researchers) that engage innovative approaches to rethinking poverty in relation to social differences and in rural and urban places.  The seminar engages with the activities of the relational poverty network (RPN).  The RPN is an international, interdisciplinary and collaborative network of poverty scholars committed to expanding poverty research beyond authoritative poverty knowledge.  Convenes with Geog 542.  Students can enroll in either seminar.

rr  10/21/13

AUTUMN, 2013 Geography Courses


  • Cities, Citizenship and Migration  (CCM)
  • Environment, Economy and Sustainability  (EES)
  • GIS, Mapping and Society (GMS)
  • Globalization, Health and Development (GHD)

Course #

Course Title

Instructor

Track(s)

102 Intro to World regions (online only) Burns CCM
123 Intro to Globalization Hannah CCM, EES, GHD
205 Intro to the Physical Environment ZumBrunnen EES
207 Economic Geography Beyers EES
230 Global Inequality Lawson CCM,  GHD
245 US Population Withers CCM, GMS
315 Explanation & Understanding in Geography Brown N/A
310 Immigrant America Ellis CCM, EES
360 Principles of GIS Mapping Bergmann GHD, GMS
375 Geopolitics Hannah GHD,GMS
425 Qualitative Methods Jarosz methods
433 Resource Use in Russia ZumBrunnen EES, GHD
476 Women and the City Burnett CCM
478 Urban Social Justice Buckingham CCM
482 GIS Data Management Nyerges GMS
500 History of Geographic Thought Jarosz  
543 Research Seminar: Ethnic Geographies Ellis
560 Principles of GIS Mapping Bergmann  
572 Research Seminar: Queer Geographies Brown  
580 Epidemiologic Geography Mayer  
582 GIS Data Management Nyerges  


Geog 123, Intro to Globalization (5)  CCM EES GHD
Joe Hannah
TTh 9:30-11:20, plus quiz sections throughout the week

Where does your food come from? Who makes your clothes? What does your bank do with your money? Who are you connected to through your work? Why was the ‘Battle in Seattle’ about more than just Seattle? How are people networking and moving around the world in new ways? How do these networks and movements change politics locally and globally? Why does increasing global interconnectedness also seem to lead to greater division and greater inequality? Why is national security said to depend on the defense of free trade and private property? How are we all connected together, and who are “we”? This course aims to help you start answering these sorts of questions by examining globalization in all its diverse forms of worldwide interconnection. Such interconnections include economic ties, political ties, cultural ties, environmental ties and media ties. These ties can be analyzed independently, but they also need to be understood in terms of how they operate in conjunction with one another to produce the overall effect that has been given the single label “globalization”. When it is talked about in this singular way, globalization often seems overpowering and unstoppable. However, by learning about each set of ties in turn you will be able to see globalization as something less monolithic, something that is being contested and reworked, something that ties the world together in a range of both constraining and empowering ways, something that is constantly changing and something that therefore can also be changed.

KEYWORDS:  globalization, neoliberalism, free trade, multinational corporations

 

Geog 205  (5)  Introduction to the Physical Environment   EES
Craig ZumBrunnen
MWF, 12:30-1:50

We live on an extraordinary planet. The activities and conveniences of modern civilization often dull our sensitivity to the miraculous workings of our planet. The majority of us spend most of our time indoors, living in cities, and because of this our dependence on natural processes is not very obvious.  This reduced sensitivity to nature in our everyday lives is a downside of civilization.  On the positive side, over the past couple of decades the application of scientific methods has yielded an explosion of knowledge about the earth.  Accordingly, the objective of this course is to provide you with a broad introduction to a spectrum of dynamic knowledge about the Earth and the impact of humans upon it, such as global warming. We believe that the better you understand the Earth, the more you will be sensitive to it, the more you will appreciate it, and the more you will wonder about it. Renewed appreciation, and particularly a rekindled sense of wonder, can help motivate all of us to live more carefully within the limits of our remarkable planetary home.

I hope to be able to achieve our objective by making use of selected aspects and processes of the physical environment and selected examples of human-environmental interaction.  Emphasis will be placed upon the processes that account for the spatial patterns and geomorphic forms of the various elements that constitute the earth’s physical environment.  In this respect, the first half of the course will focus upon geomorphic materials, agents, processes, landforms and their geographical distribution; while the second half will focus upon atmospheric phenomena, climatic elements, processes and their geographical patterns.  At appropriate times practical lab skill exercises will be used both to reinforce the lecture material and to present new and/or additional material.  Topographic map reading and interpretation will also be introduced at appropriate times in the class.

Keywords: systems, tectonics, lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere

 

GEOG 207   (5)      Economic Geography        EES
Bill Beyers
MTWF 8:30-9:20 am, plus Th quiz section

What’s where; how does it affect our lives and why?  Think about this in terms of economic activities, and you’ve got the purpose of Geography 207. This course is an introduction to and overview of economic geography: patterns, trends, and theories of the geographic arrangement and interaction of economic resources, activities, and institutions.  We’ll cover principles used to understand location and interaction at the intra-urban, interregional, and international scales.  Given this broad sweep of material, the course is relevant to students pursuing studies in geography, economics, planning, business, and regional studies. The course format entails lecture and lecture notes, assigned reading, three empirical case studies, weekly review/discussion section, two 50-minute tests and a final examination.  Your writing of the case results makes this into a Writing course.  No prerequisites — we’ll introduce economic and geographic principles as we need them.

GEOG 230  (5)    Global Inequality              CCM, GHD
Vicky Lawson
TTh 9:30-11:20 am, plus F quiz

Explores geographies of inequality around the globe.  We will discuss the connections between inequality and international development efforts with a focus on Latin America, Africa and Asia.  Our focus will be on the causes and geographic patterns of social inequality worldwide.  The course begins by reexamining some of the defining themes in debates over development: ‘overpopulation’, migration/immigration, and the production of inequality and poverty.  We discuss the historical legacies of colonialism in Africa, Latin America and Asia, linking these to current debates about ‘development’ – such as state intervention versus free markets.  We will examine global to local forces that shape inequality and will discuss working in the global economy and grassroots networks of political action.

Geog 245  US Population (5)      CCM, GMS
Suzanne Withers
MWF, 12:30-1:50, plus Wed  lab

Provides an understanding of the geographic variation of the diversity of America’s population. This course advances a demographic perspective towards understanding social change. Students will gain an understanding of the connections between population processes (temporal and spatial) and societal dynamics and diversity. The course examines such topics as the history of U.S. immigration policy, understanding racial differences in mortality, the concept of ‘race’ and its treatment in the U.S. census over time, political redistricting and affirmative gerrymandering, measures of segregation and variations in the internal migration of populations. Students will come away from the class with: (1) a practical understanding of population processes (fertility, mortality, and migration); (2) knowledge of the geographic variation in population structure and characteristics; (3) knowledge of the sources of data for demographic research; (4) experience using geographic information systems for geodemographic analysis; and (5) an appreciation for the demographic underpinnings of contemporary social issues. As such, this course provides an introduction to the field of population geography.

Geog 310 (5)  Immigrant America   CCM, EES
Mark Ellis
TTh 11:30-1:20

This course will examine US immigration trends and policies from a geographic perspective. Specifically, we will explore where US immigrants come from, why they come from these places, where they settle in the US, and how their geography intersects with ideas about assimilation and national identity.  We will also discuss a variety of other issues that bear on the geography of US immigration, including the history of US immigration policy, current efforts to manage authorized and unauthorized immigration, ideas of citizenship, and disputes about the impacts of the foreign-born on the economy, society and environment of the US.  Students who finish this course will have a greater knowledge of basic facts about US immigration policy and US immigrant groups; and a solid grasp of the broader social, economic, cultural, and geographic issues that frame debates about immigration policy in this country.


GEOG 315   (5)     Explanation and Understanding in Geography    “W” course
Michael Brown
MWF 9:30-10:20, plus TTh quiz sections

The objectives of this course are fourfold:

1.) to design your own geographic research effectively,
2.) to evaluate critically the research designs of others,
3.) to develop your appreciation of how knowledge is acquired, and
4.) to prepare you for your future courses in geographic data analysis (425 and 426 for example).

By the end of this course, you will come to appreciate the diversity of methods in geography, the appropriateness of different methods for different research questions, and the standards by which each method should be evaluated.

Keywords:  research, geography, social science, logic, reasoning.

 

GEOG 360  (5)  Principles of GIS Mapping      GHD, GMS
Luke Bergmann
MWF 11:30-12:20 am, Labs MW or TTh

 Origins, development, and methods of cartography. Principles of data representation and map design for thematic mapping and spatial analysis. Introduction to principles of geographic information systems (GIS).  Keywords:  GIS, cartography, spatial analysis. Offered jointly with Geography 560.

 

Geog 375 (5) Geopolitics   GHD  GMS
Joe Hannah
MW 1:30-3:20

Geopolitics is the practice of envisioning and representing global space in a way that reflects particular strategic interests – though these interests are not always overtly stated. Most geopolitical treatises focus on some supposedly innate, objective difference between people and places – based on religion, race, resource endowment, and so on – that presents a security threat. This course draws mostly from critical geopolitics literature that deconstructs these spatial representations, revealing their cartographic constructions and erasures and the material violences they produce. We will take a historical overview of some of the dominant geopolitical imaginations of the last 200 years, including colonial representations of ‘the Orient’, Nazi propaganda maps, the bipolar world of the Cold War discourse, and the current US-led ‘war on terror’. We will also explore the ties and tensions between contemporary geopolitics and neoliberal globalization. Keywords: geographic imaginaries, critical studies, representation, security, international relations

 

GEOG 425  (5)  Qualitative Methods in Geography  Methods requirement
Becky Burnett
TTh 12:30-2:20

Qualitative methods are important tools in Geographical research, enabling researchers to explore important issues such as human-environment relationships, the social production of space and place, and the spatial production of the social world. In this course we will introduce students to a variety of qualitative methodologies relevant to human geography based-inquiry.  Fundamental to the broader research process is an understanding of how knowledge is produced, what “counts” as knowledge, and the politics of knowledge production itself. During this course, you will 1) expand and deepen your knowledge of qualitative research methodologies; 2) practice the use of qualitative research techniques; and 3) learn about and discuss current issues in qualitative methodology including research ethics, representation and positionality.  Keywords: qualitative methodologies, feminist theory, ethnography, interviewing

 

GEOG 433  Resource Use In Russia (5)      EES,  GHD
Craig ZumBrunnen
TTh, 1:30-3:20

Geographic and historical background of the natural resource base of Russia and the Newly Independent States. Geographic and historical perspectives on Soviet natural resource use and management in theory and practice. Implications of the breakup of the USSR for natural resource use and management.

 

GEOG 476  (5)  Women and the City    CCM
Becky Burnett
TTh 2:30-4:20

Explores the reciprocal relations between subjectivities, gender relations, the layout of cities, and the activities of urban residents. Focus on North America and some European examples. The central theme is that the layout of cities and the activities of the people in cities are gendered (and classed, raced, etc). The class provides a critical appreciation of: (1) the breath and depth of feminist urban geography, and why the field emerged and why it should be studied; (2) some of the major topics addressed by feminist urban geographers; and (3) the types of research strategies employed in the study of feminist urban geographies. Keywords: feminism, work, diversity, safety, housing, planning, urban politics, inequality

Geog 478 (5)  Urban Social Justice  CCM
Will Buckingham
TTh  9:30-11:20

Designed to help students delve deeper into the social relations that shape cities, both in the US and abroad, in order to develop a greater understanding of the dynamic nature of cities and development. In the course of this class, we will discuss the processes and problems that face cities and their citizens all over the world, and we will do so as geographers, developing an understanding of geographical debates related to cities. This class will focus on debates of the 20th and 21st centuries, looking at the ways in which class, race, gender, wealth, colonialism and resistance all shape the physical and social geographies of cities. Students are expected to already have a working knowledge of the city, and will be expected to challenge themselves as we explore the greatest challenges facing cities today.

Geog 482 (5)  GIS Data Management  GMS
Tim Nyerges
MW, 12:30-1:20, plus TTh lab

Examines the principles and application of geospatial database management software, including personal and enterprise geodatabase management solutions. Considers enterprise architectures for GIS relative to organizational size. Addresses collaborative uses of  Internet, Intranet and Extranet architectures.  Offers case studies in database management, with a variety of dataset types and sizes.

 

GEOG 500  (5)   Contemporary Geographic Thought
 Lucy Jarosz
M 2:30-5:20 pm

Historical development of modern geography. Emphasis on various philosophical and methodological debates in geography and the contexts from which they emerged. Investigates geography’s foundational concepts and institutions; how they have responded to — and influenced — the world around them

Geog 543, (5)  Research Seminar: Ethnic Geographies
Mark Ellis
W
, 2:30-5:20

Immigration, Ethnicity, and Race. Will feature readings and discussion on the immigrant settlement geographies in the US.  The emphasis will be on the present with a particular focus on how immigrants have adjusted (or not) to changing local economies and the local and state patchwork of policies targeting the unauthorized.  

Geog 560, Principles of GIS Mapping  (5)
Luke Bergmann
MWF, 11:30-12:20, plus either MW or TTh labs

Graduate students only—see Geog 360 for course description

Geog 572, Research Seminar: Queer Geographies (5)
Michael Brown
W, 12:30-3:30

The seminar this year will focus on questions of biopolitics and biopower.  We will focus on the works of Nicholas Rose, amongst others, to work through questions of the body, population as well as “life itself”.  Questions of space, sexuality, and sex will be woven through the seminar.  Students interested in health and medical geography, population and political geography- as well as feminist and queer geography- might be interested in this course.

GEOG 580 (5)  Epidemiologic Geography
Jonathan Mayer
Th,  2:30-5:20 pm

Offered jointly with HSERV 586A

The purpose of this course is to learn the major theories, methods, and debates of this highly interdisciplinary field. Based upon readings, lectures, and class discussions, students can expect to have a broad acquaintance with the field. This can serve either as a basis for research in medical geography, or as an introduction to a medical social science in light of other traditions of geography, social science, and public health. Medical geography is inherently a field of geography, a health-related field of social science, and a subdiscipline of public health.

Geog 582 (5)    GIS Data Management
Tim Nyerges
MW, 12:30-2:20 plus either T or Th lab

Graduate students only. For description, see Geog 482

Geography, Spring, 2013 course descriptions

  • Cities, Citizenship and Migration  (CCM)
  • Environment, Economy and Sustainability  (EES)
  • GIS, Mapping and Society (GMS)
  • Globalization, Health and Development (GHD)
Geog 102 (online) CCM
Geog 123 (online) GHD CCM EES
Geog 195 GHD EES
Geog 200 (online) GHD CCM EES
Geog 208 CCM EES
Geog 277 GHD CCM
Geog 310 CCM
Geog 326—meets “additional methods” requirement
Geog 360 GHD EES GMS
Geog 370 GHD EES
Geog 371 GHD EES
Geog 380 GHD EES
Geog 435 GHD CCM EES
Geog 439  GHD EES
Geog 469 GMS
Geog 474 GHD EES
Geog 480 GHD EES
Geog 490 GHD CCM EES GMS
Geog 495 GMS

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Click here for online course information

 

Geog 195, Special Topics: Food & Culture In Russia (5)  vlpa   ees, ghd
MTWTh 11:30-12:20)\ Lowe 201
Jose Alaniz

Food is much more than something to put in your mouth for nourishment; it is a cultural object of over-arching significance. This course examines food in Russian literature, cinema, art and memoir.  Relying on the critical writings of Food Studies scholars such as Michael Pollan and others, we will consider food in the Russian context, from the Middle Ages to the post-Soviet era, delving into such matters as table manners; excess; holidays;  vegetarianism; communal dining; Soviet home economics; and hunger throughout Russian history. We will pay  special attention to the particular artistic challenge of representing food  in the literary and visual arts, and how Russians have responded. The reading list includes Nikolai Gogol, Leo Tolstoy, Mikhail Bulgakov,  Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Vladimir Sorokin and Lyudmilla Petrushevskaya.

GEOG 208   (5)    CCM, GHD, EES
Geography of The World Economy
Mark Ellis
MWF  9:30-10:20, Quiz sections Th

Examines the relationship between the globalization of economic activity and regional development. Topics include international trade, colonialism, industrial capitalism, advanced  capitalism, and the globalization of labor markets. Keywords:  economy, development, globalization, trade, colonialism, history.

GEOG 277 (5) CCM  GHD
The Geography of Cities
TTH, 9:30-11:20, plus F quiz section
Kim England

A geographical survey of concepts and issues related to urbanization.  As the focus is on cities, we explore a range of topics (such as the economy, social dynamics and politics) through the urban context.  Specific topics include the evolution of American urbanization and the urban built environment; the roles of transportation, economic restructuring, politics, and urban planning in producing urban change; suburbanization and urban sprawl; inner-city gentrification; and how issues of class, race, and gender are embedded in the geographies of cities. Keywords: economic/social restructuring, housing, inequality, politics and planning, urban change.

GEOG 310, (5) CCM
Immigrant America
Natasha Rivers
MW, 1:30-3:20
Examines U.S. immigration trends and policies from a geographic perspective. Topics include where immigrants come from, where they settle in the United States. Immigrant employment enclaves, the effects of U.S. immigration policy on immigrant settlement and employment patterns, illegal immigration, citizenship, and barriers to immigrant success in the United States. Keywords: migration, refugees, assimilation, citizenship, settlement geographies

 

GEOG 326 (5) METHODS requirement
Quantitative Methods in Geography
Matt Townley
MWF, 9:30-10:20, plus Th quiz section
Introduction to quantitative methods in geography with a focus on, but not limited to, statistical techniques. Through this course, students will develop an understanding of basic concepts, reasoning and procedures in quantitative methods used in geography. Topics covered include basic descriptive statistics, sampling, inference statistics, and correlation. The course helps develop skills in using and analyzing statistical data in the broader context of geographic applications and research.  Keywords: statistics, methods, analysis, research

GEOG 360  (5)     GHD,  GMS
Principles of GIS Mapping
Joe Hannah
MWF 10:30-12:20  Labs MW or TTh

Introduces the methods of making maps using geographic information systems (GIS) and  the basics of cartography that go into making those maps. Using both cartographic theory and practical approaches, this course focuses on principles of data representation and map design for thematic mapping. Students will complete hands-on assignments throughout the quarter to gain experience using GIS, making a number of different kinds of thematic maps.  No prior GIS experience is necessary, but this course assumes students are familiar with using personal computers, particularly with the Microsoft Windows operating system.

Geog 370 (5)   EES  GHD
Problems in Resource Management
Craig ZumBrunnen
TTh, 11:30-1:20

Designed to help students become more effective participants in environmental decision making as citizens and professionals.  Students can expect to learn about: 1) basic economic concepts as applied to natural resource management; 2) a survey history of American resource use controversies and practices; 3) a critical review of the methods/tools of benefit-cost analysis including risk analysis; 4) major ecosystem concepts and processes; 5) natural and human processes associated with water, air usage and pollution; 6) natural (e.g., thermodynamic) and human-economic processes and problems bearing on local, national and global energy use; 7) the strengths and shortcomings of various strategies and policies for environmental and resource protection; and 8) some appreciation for the complexities involved in the controversies surrounding the concept(s) of “sustainable development.” The primary methods of instruction which will be employed include: 1) lecture and class discussions, 2) 3CM and other group experiential learning processes, 3) small group activities and issue debates, 4) introduction to benefit-cost & cost-effective analyses, and 5) possibly some videos and short field trips.  It should be strongly emphasized that the purpose and perspective of this course is as much to develop critical thinking and questioning skills as it is to convey a specific body of information. Accordingly, expect this class to generate more questions than answers.  You should take this course if you are interested in an environmental career, or simply want to be a more informed citizen. Keywords: ecosystems, environment, economics.

GEOG 371, (5) EES, GHD
World Hunger & Agricultural Development

Joe Hannah
TTH, 9:30-11:20
Addresses hunger and poverty in their relation to agricultural development and modernization, food security policy, and the globalization of food and agriculture.  The course’s objectives are to understand how hunger has been historically conceptualized and mapped as a pressing problem; to understand how colonialism and international economic development processes contribute to the hunger; to study the changes in international food security policy and the material outcomes of these policies; to understand the relationship of  the development of the global food system to hunger and to recognize organizations and social movements dedicated to eliminating hunger  through movements encompassing social justice, food sovereignty and rights based approaches to food.  Recommended: GEOG 230, GEOG 330, or GEOG 335. Keywords:  development, agriculture, food, globalization

GEOG 380  (“W” Course)  (5)   EES, GHD
Geographic Patterns of Health
Jonathan Mayer
MW, 11:30-1:20, plus W quiz sections

Geography of infectious and chronic diseases at local, national, and international scales; environmental, biological, cultural, and social explanations of those variations. Special emphasis is given to the social, cultural, epidemiologic and  geographic issues surrounding HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, waterborne diseases, and urban slum health, as well as the issues surrounding the neglected tropical diseases a (NTDs), which have moved to the forefront of public policy, epidemiologic research, and vaccine/medication development. Finally, we will study the coexistence of infectious diseases and chronic diseases in developing countries, leading to a reconsideration of whether there is such a phenomenon of the “epidemiologic transition” in contemporary societies. Much of the reading and discussion is of rapidly developing research that has just recently emerged, and we will read and consider this research, rather than read “about” the research.

GEOG 412 (5)
History of Geographic Thought
Katharyne Mitchell
TTh, 1:30-3:20

This class will be run as a reading-intensive seminar for those interested in pursuing graduate education in the future.  The intellectual purpose of the course is to explore a series of key theoretical positions and debates that have influenced the discipline of geography over the past century.  We examine these positions historically and also link them to current debates and practices. The themes we pursue are not limited to geography, but are part of wider epistemological and practical questions affecting the social sciences and humanities more broadly.  They include examinations of mapping and cartographic practice, landscape and culture, nature/society, development, the quantitative revolution, food and health, and imperialism, sovereignty, and violence.  Students are expected to complete readings on time and to come prepared to help lead classes and be an active participant in the seminar.  Keywords: Geographic Thought, Philosophy, Ideas, History, Epistemology, Practice

GEOG 435     CCM, EES, GHD
Industrialization & Urban China (5)
Kam Wing Chan
MW  11:30-1:20 pm

Examines the relationships between economic development and spatial development in post-1949 China. China was once held up as a model for developing countries. In this course we will examine post-1949 Chinese dual economy and society, industrialization strategy and resulting socioeconomic and spatial impacts. The course focuses on a set of related issues: industrial location, rural industrialization, the hukou system, urbanization policies, rural-urban relations, migration and urban development. Students will gain a deeper understanding the complex issues of industrialization and urbanization in a transitional economy now closely linked to the world. Prerequisite: Geog 236 or 336, or a background course on contemporary China.  Students are expected to have a basic knowledge of China.  Keywords: China, development, economics, industry, cities, migration, labor, globalization

GEOG 439 (5)  CCM, EES
Geography of Employment
Becky Burnett
MW, 1:30-3:20
Designed to help students think critically about the intersections between race, ethnicity, gender and labor in the United States.  Asks students to explore the ways in which identity, political economy, and space come together to create different patterns and relationships in terms of labor.   While there will be a strong focus on analyses of labor from a geographical perspective, attention will also be given to scholars outside of geography and outside of mainstream academia.  Students will begin the course with a theoretical overview of the debates, conceptualizations, and constructions of labor, race, gender, and class.  Next, the course will focus specifically on case studies, approaches and policies that have influenced the empirical landscape of labor in the U.S. in the past century.  Finally, we will turn toward alternatives to current interpretations of labor and work both in terms of theory and material practices.

GEOG 469   (5)   GMS
GIS Workshop
Tim Nyerges
T Th 12:30 – 2:20 pm

As the capstone experience in our GIS curriculum, the goal of this course is for you to become a capable and confident GIS analyst who can develop and use GIS for problem solving that involves database assembly, data analysis, map visualization, presentation, and reporting to meet the needs of project partners. The course is an intensive workshop that involves hands-on experience in which student teams will develop GIS projects in collaboration with local partners (who may be from the University, community agencies, or local government). You will be involved in a range of tasks associated with GIS application: working with your team members and project partners to identify project goals, acquiring and preparing spatial data for GIS analysis, communicating with clients to assess progress, managing spatial data, and producing necessary maps and analyses. In lecture and readings, we will examine GIS project management strategies in a variety of organizational and application contexts. Please note: To enroll in this course, Geography 462 or 461 or 482 is required (or equivalent GIS experience). Qualified non-geography majors should email rroth@u. to get on waiting list.

GEOG 474 (5)    CCM
Geography & The Law
Brandon Derman
MW, 11:30-1:20

Explores the intersections of law, geography, and society. Topics include social and environmental justice, political power and activism, and the construction of legal norms in the international context.  The course is structured as a seminar, emphasizing discussion and written work engaged with a set of key readings.  Keywords: social justice, environmental justice, law, political geography, power, activism, the transnational 

Environmental Geography, Climate and Health  EES  GHD

Jonathan Mayer
TTh 1:30-3:20
Demonstrates and investigates how human-environment relations are expressed in the context of health and disease. Local and global examples demonstrate the power of systems thinking  at the intersection of the social, physical, and biological sciences. Examines interactions between individual health, public health, and social, biological, and physical phenomena.  Specific examples include global climate change/ climate variability and its actual and anticipated effects on many health conditions. We also consider health; air pollution and respiratory diseases with an emphasis on cancer and asthma; environmental contamination with lead and adverse effects on child health and child development; industrial pollution and cancers. Reading includes primary research articles, and there is an emphasis on study design and methods of analysis. More broadly, we examine the nature of evidence and causality, and contrast (social) scientific criteria for proving causation with legal considerations in disease causality. Formal study designs, the nature of proof, and ways of testing hypotheses about causal relationships and association are prominent in the course.  Prerequisite: Geog 280 or Geog 380 or epidemiology course.

GEOG 490 (6)   CCM, EES ,GHD,GMS
The Seattle Region
Michael Brown
TTh, 9:30-11:20

This course has two components.  Students will develop and execute their own small individual research projects on some aspect of local geography, subject to approval of the instructor.  Class time will be comprised of a seminar, where we will read and discuss texts on the social, political, cultural and economic historical-geographies of Seattle.  Please see the textbook list for specifics.  Students are expected to prepare for and actively participate in all seminars.  Students are expected to have Geog 315 and other geography courses (especially methods courses) in order to undertake the research project.

GEOG 495 (5) GMS
Special Topics: Digital Geographies
Luke Bergmann
MW, 10:30-12:20

.What differences can living in a digital age of rapid change make to what we offer to the world as geographers? In this course, we will look to the future and explore what might be possible when critical geographic thought meets emerging digital technologies. We have learned a lot about how to do analyses and communicate about an issue through making a map and/or writing a paper for a professor or a supervisor. But how does the way we experience, analyze, and communicate about that map (or about a picture, a text, a video, a dataset, or a million pictures…) change when we are designing digital environments that friends, family, colleagues, and even fellow citizens can also use to explore issues themselves? What are the implications for us and for our larger worlds?

You will leave this course empowered, not only with defined skills that will be important to many good emerging jobs, but also with flexible skills and intellectual vision needed to create–differently. So, for example, we will probably begin with the basics of learning to program in Python and use Python scripting to expand and deepen what is possible within ArcGIS. But we will then leave the solitary desktop and travel into the societies of the web, where GIS, geovisualization and geographic thought are being redistributed, remixed, and mashed up among new networks of people and computers. We will have a gentle introduction to HTML, CSS, Javascript, new web mapping frameworks, how they integrate with what we have already learned in ArcGIS, and a (powerful, flexible, new) framework called D3.js that will help us bring our own ways of viewing the world to life interactively on the web. Along the way, our readings will be both applied and theoretical. You’ll learn not only how people have been visualizing and programming, but also about how critical GIS scholars have identified assumptions, ideologies, and rigidities in existing practices that can help us figure out how to do things differently.

This will be a very “hands-on” and interactive course! A lot of our time will be spent in a hybrid lecture/lab where we will be working together. Although there will likely be some quizzes and some individual written reflections and analyses, there won’t be a big final exam. Mainly, we will be looking for what creative and compelling things you will come up with, individually and collaboratively, in labs and projects. And we will be looking to see your thoughtful reflections on the process of your own learning.

 

Of course, this course will probably be of interest to those with technical inclinations. But it should also be of interest (and be accessible!) to budding critical human geographers who have taken GEOG 360 but who really haven’t seen how some types of GIS can work with the things that they have been exploring in their other human geography classes. Either way, if you have any questions please do contact me, Professor Bergmann, at geoglrb@uw.edu. I’m very much looking forward to what we will create in Spring Quarter!

GEOG 520
GIS Representation Research Seminar
Tim Nyerges
M, 2:30-5:20

Geographic information representation is a fundamental aspect of sustainability information when addressing well-being of urban-regional communities.  This seminar focuses on the creation and use of sustainability information from a sustainability information science perspective. Students are introduced to the relationships among sustainability science theory, sustainability information science methods, and sustainability management practice. We will treat sustainability and resilience from several vantage points in published literature to better understand “sustainable resilience”.  Sustainable resilience is the ability of a natural-human (coupled) system to maintain and/or improve system behavior within resilience states of well-being, e.g., avoid, adapt, and/or recover from undesirable states. Using spatial-temporal information to characterize ranges of resilience is a key aspect of sustainable resilience. Participatory geographic information systems (GIS) are fundamental information technologies that can process spatial-temporal data, but clearly need to move beyond the current capabilities.  Directions for spatial-temporal information technology will be considered based on class interests, but we will particularly address the possibilities of online spatial-temporal information technologies.

GEOG 542
Research Seminar: Social & Population Geographies
Mark Ellis
W, 2:30-5:20

Geog 560, Geog 569—see Geog 360 & 469 descriptions.

Geog 575
Research Seminar: Advanced Political Geography
Matt Sparke
Th, 2:30-5:20

Version 2

RR
2/1/13

AUTUMN, 2012 Geography Courses


  • Cities, Citizenship and Migration  (CCM)
  • Environment, Economy and Sustainability  (EES)
  • GIS, Mapping and Society (GMS)
  • Globalization, Health and Development (GHD)
Course # Course Title Instructor Track(s)
123 Intro to Globalization Sparke CCM, EES, GHD
207 Economic Geography Beyers EES
230 Global Inequality Lawson CCM,  GHD
245 US Population Withers CCM, GMS
315 Explanation & Understanding in Geography Brown N/A
335 The Developing World TBA EES, GHD
344 Migration in the Global Economy Newhouse CCM, EES
349 International Trade TBA EES, GHD
360 Principles of GIS Mapping Bergmann GHD, GMS
431 Geography & Gender TBA CCM, GHD
433 Resource Use in Russia ZumBrunnen EES, GHD
478 Social Justice in the City TBA CCM
482 GIS Data Management Nyerges GMS
495/381 Mapping Health Hannah EES, GHD, GMS
500 History of Geographic Thought Mitchell
525 Advanced Qualitative Methods in Geog Jarosz
560 Principles of GIS Mapping Bergmann
572 Research Seminar: Queer Geographies Brown
580 Epidemiologic Geography Mayer
582 GIS Data Management Nyerges

GEOG 123   (5)  Intro to Globalization        CCM, EES, GHD
Matt Sparke

MW, 1:30-3:20
quiz sections throughout the week

Where does your food come from? Who makes your clothes? What does your bank do with your money? Who are you connected to through your work? Why was the ‘Battle in Seattle’ about more than just Seattle? How are people networking and moving around the world in new ways? How do these networks and movements change politics locally and globally? Why does increasing global interconnectedness also seem to lead to greater division and greater inequality? Why is national security said to depend on the defense of free trade and private property? How are we all connected together, and who are “we”? This course aims to help you start answering these sorts of questions by examining globalization in all its diverse forms of worldwide interconnection. Such interconnections include economic ties, political ties, cultural ties, environmental ties and media ties. These ties can be analyzed independently, but they also need to be understood in terms of how they operate in conjunction with one another to produce the overall effect that has been given the single label “globalization”. When it is talked about in this singular way, globalization often seems overpowering and unstoppable. However, by learning about each set of ties in turn you will be able to see globalization as something less monolithic, something that is being contested and reworked, something that ties the world together in a range of both constraining and empowering ways, something that is constantly changing and something that therefore can also be changed.

KEYWORDS:  globalization, neoliberalism, free trade, multinational corporations

 

GEOG 207   (5)      Economic Geography        EES

Bill Beyers

MTWF 10:30-11:20 am, plus Th quiz section

What’s where; how does it affect our lives and why?  Think about this in terms of economic activities, and you’ve got the purpose of Geography 207. This course is an introduction to and overview of economic geography: patterns, trends, and theories of the geographic arrangement and interaction of economic resources, activities, and institutions.  We’ll cover principles used to understand location and interaction at the intra-urban, interregional, and international scales.  Given this broad sweep of material, the course is relevant to students pursuing studies in geography, economics, planning, business, and regional studies. The course format entails lecture and lecture notes, assigned reading, three empirical case studies, weekly review/discussion section, two 50-minute tests and a final examination.  Your writing of the case results makes this into a Writing course.  No prerequisites — we’ll introduce economic and geographic principles as we need them. Keywords:
GEOG 230  (5)    Global Inequality              CCM, GHD

Vicky Lawson
TTh 9:30-11:20 am, plus F quiz

Explores geographies of inequality around the globe.  We will discuss the connections between inequality and international development efforts with a focus on Latin America, Africa and Asia.  Our focus will be on the causes and geographic patterns of social inequality worldwide.  The course begins by reexamining some of the defining themes in debates over development: ‘overpopulation’, migration/immigration, and the production of inequality and poverty.  We discuss the historical legacies of colonialism in Africa, Latin America and Asia, linking these to current debates about ‘development’ – such as state intervention versus free markets.  We will examine global to local forces that shape inequality and will discuss working in the global economy and grassroots networks of political action. Keywords:
Geog 245  US Population (5)      CCM, GMS

Suzanne Withers

TTh 12:30-2:20, plus Wed quiz section
Provides an understanding of the geographic variation of the diversity of America’s population. This course advances a demographic perspective towards understanding social change. Students will gain an understanding of the connections between population processes (temporal and spatial) and societal dynamics and diversity. The course examines such topics as the history of U.S. immigration policy, understanding racial differences in mortality, the concept of ‘race’ and its treatment in the U.S. census over time, political redistricting and affirmative gerrymandering, measures of segregation and variations in the internal migration of populations. Students will come away from the class with: (1) a practical understanding of population processes (fertility, mortality, and migration); (2) knowledge of the geographic variation in population structure and characteristics; (3) knowledge of the sources of data for demographic research; (4) experience using geographic information systems for geodemographic analysis; and (5) an appreciation for the demographic underpinnings of contemporary social issues. As such, this course provides an introduction to the field of population geography.

 


GEOG 315   (5)     Explanation and Understanding in Geography    “W” course

Michael Brown

MWF 9:30-10:20, plus TTh quiz sections
The objectives of this course are fourfold:

1.) to design your own geographic research effectively,

2.) to evaluate critically the research designs of others,

3.) to develop your appreciation of how knowledge is acquired, and

4.) to prepare you for your future courses in geographic data analysis (425 and 426 for example).

By the end of this course, you will come to appreciate the diversity of methods in geography, the appropriateness of different methods for different research questions, and the standards by which each method should be evaluated.

Keywords:  research, geography, social science, logic, reasoning.
Geog 335 (5) The Developing World   EES, GHD
Instructor TBA
TTh 9:30-11:20

Characteristics and causes, external and internal, of Third World development and obstacles to that development, with a critical development focus. Special attention to social processes, disasters and disaster recovery, NGO’s, resource development, and geopolitics, drawing on specific case studies from the Middle East, Africa,  and Latin America and the Caribbean.

 

 

Geog 344 (5)  Migration in the Global Economy   CCM, EES

Leonie Newhouse

MW, 2:30-4:20

In this course we will analyze the relationship between human mobility in the late 20th century and changes in the global economy.  The course will familiarize students with research on international migration from a diversity of approaches and methods.  Topics include the rise of transnational migration patterns, gendered migration, forced migration and refugee flows, networks of ethnicity, and questions of integration, assimilation and citizenship.

Offered jointly with SIS 344

Key Words: migration, political economy, geopolitics, transnationalism.
GEOG 360  (5)  Principles of GIS Mapping      GHD, GMS

Luke Bergmann

MWF 11:30-12:20 am, Labs MW or TTh
Origins, development, and methods of cartography. Principles of data representation and map design for thematic mapping and spatial analysis. Introduction to principles of geographic information systems (GIS).  Keywords:  GIS, cartography, spatial analysis. Offered jointly with Geography 560.

 


Geog 431  Geography and Gender (5)  CCM,  GHD

Instructor TBA

TTh 11:30-1:20

Examines theories and case studies across international, national, and regional scales in order to illustrate the impacts of social and economic processes upon the construction of gender in particular places

GEOG 433  Resource Use In Russia (5)      EES,  GHD

Craig ZumBrunnen

TTh, 1:30-3:20

Geographic and historical background of the natural resource base of Russia and the Newly Independent States. Geographic and historical perspectives on Soviet natural resource use and management in theory and practice. Implications of the breakup of the USSR for natural resource use and management.

 

GEOG 478  (5) Social Justice and The City   CCM
Instructor:  TBA
TTh, 2:30-4:2
0

Designed to help students delve deeper into the social relations that shape cities, both in the US and abroad, in order to develop a greater understanding of the dynamic nature of cities and development. In the course of this class, we will discuss the processes and problems that face cities and their citizens all over the world, and we will do so as geographers, developing an understanding of geographical debates related to cities. This class will focus on debates of the 20th and 21st centuries, looking at the ways in which class, race, gender, wealth, colonialism and resistance all shape the physical and social geographies of cities. Students are expected to already have a working knowledge of the city, and will be expected to challenge themselves as we explore the greatest challenges facing cities today.

Geog 482 (5)  GIS Data Management  GMS
Tim Nyerges
MW, 12:30-2:20, plus T or Th lab

Examines the principles and application of geospatial database management software, including personal and enterprise geodatabase management solutions. Considers enterprise architectures for GIS relative to organizational size. Addresses collaborative uses of  Internet, Intranet and Extranet architectures.  Offers case studies in database management, with a variety of dataset types and sizes.


Geog 495  Special Topics: Mapping Health    GHD,  GMS, EES

(will eventually be listed under its new permanent number, Geog 381)
Joe Hannah

MW, 1:30-3:20

Explores global public health mapping through the lens of critical cartography, examining how worldviews and health policies interact to shape maps, intervention targeting and health outcomes.  Gives students the geographical background and contemporary social theory needed to understand and work within the politics of health mapping.

 

GEOG 500  (5) Contemporary Geographic Thought
Katharyne Mitchell

M 2:30-5:20 pm

Historical development of modern geography. Emphasis on various philosophical and methodological debates in geography and the contexts from which they emerged. Investigates geography’s foundational concepts and institutions; how they have responded to — and influenced — the world around them.


Geog 525  Advanced Qualitative Methods in Geography (5)

Lucy Jarosz

W, 2:30-5:20

Examines why and how qualitative methods can be used to pursue research in geography. Includes consideration of theoretical, ethical and political issues that arise with qualitative methods. Offers considerable practice in such methods as ethnography, focus groups, interviewing, discourse & content analyses, narrative analysis, and archival analysis.

 

Geog 560, Principles of GIS Mapping  (5)

Luke Bergmann

MWF, 11:30-12:20, plus either MW or TTh labs

Graduate students only—see Geog 360 for course description

Geog 572  Research Seminar: Queer Geographies (5)

Michael Brown

W, 2:30-5:20

The course this year will be designed as a reading seminar around the work of Michel Foucault.  Through collaborative reading of key books and lectures, we will focus on four elements in Foucault’s influential thinking:  its role in the formation of queer theory and politics; its theorizations of sexualities, desire, and the body; its treatment and neglect of spatialities; and its uptake (or not) in critical human geography.

keywords: sexualities, space, power, identity, geographic thought

 

GEOG 580 (5) Epidemiologic Geography

Jonathan Mayer

W,  2:30-5:20 pm

Offered jointly with HSERV 586A

The purpose of this course is to learn the major theories, methods, and debates of this highly interdisciplinary field. Based upon readings, lectures, and class discussions, students can expect to have a broad acquaintance with the field. This can serve either as a basis for research in medical geography, or as an introduction to a medical social science in light of other traditions of geography, social science, and public health. Medical geography is inherently a field of geography, a health-related field of social science, and a subdiscipline of public health.

Geog 582 (5)    GIS Data Management

Tim Nyerges
MW, 12:30-2:20 plus either T or Th lab

Graduate students only

For description, see Geog 482

 

 

Version 1.1

rroth  4/17/12

Geography, Spring, 2012 course descriptions

  • Cities, Citizenship and Migration  (CCM)
  • Environment, Economy and Sustainability  (EES)
  • GIS, Mapping and Society (GMS)
  • Globalization, Health and Development (GHD)
Geog 208 GHD CCM EES
Geog 271 GHD EES
Geog 277 GHD CCM
Geog 315–required for everyone
Geog 317–meets “additional methods” requirement
Geog 335 GHD CCM
Geog 350 EES
Geog 360 GHD EES GMS
Geog 370 GHD EES
Geog 380 GHD EES
Geog 426-meets “additional methods” requirement
Geog 435 GHD CCM EES
Geog 469 GMS
Geog 474 GHD EES
Geog 479 CCM
Geog 480 GHD EES
Geog 490 GHD CCM EES GMS

GEOG 208   (5) CCM, GHD,  EES

 

Geography of The World Economy
Mark Ellis

 

MWF  9:30-10:20, Quiz sections Th

Examines the relationship between the globalization of economic activity and regional development. Topics include international trade, colonialism, industrial capitalism, advanced  capitalism, and the globalization of labor markets. Keywords: economy, development, globalization, trade, colonialism, history.

GEOG 271      (5)   EES, GHD

Geography of Food & Eating

Lucy Jarosz

MWF 1:30-2:20, plus Th or Fri quiz section

Food is something none of us can live without.  It is essential for life, and it also shapes our environment and our relationships to other people and places.  Where is our food grown and how?  Where and what do we eat?  How does food identify people and places?   These questions are fundamentally geographic.  Exploring how food is grown and consumed leads to a deeper understanding of societies and environments and their complex relationships.This course examines food production, distribution, and consumption issues across geographic scales, spanning the microcosm of the individual body to the national and global scales.  We explore the political, social, cultural and economic dimensions of food and eating in particular spaces, places, environments, contexts and regions in order to introduce key concepts and modes of analysis in human geography. Keywords:  food, agriculture, sustainability, globalization

 

GEOG 277 (5) CCM  GHD

The Geography of Cities

MWF, 12:30-1:20, PLUS QUIZ SECTION

Kim England

Study of 1) systems of cities–their historical development, location, distribution and functions, and 2) their internal structure—the location of activities within cities. Emphasizes explanations of contemporary urban patterns and issues. Keywords: suburbanization, housing, segregation and economic growth.

GEOG 315    (5)  “W” courseExplanation and Understanding in Geography

Joe Hannah

 

 

MWF 9:30-10:20 am, Quiz T Th

The objectives of this course are fourfold:

1.) to design your own geographic research effectively,

2.) to evaluate critically the research designs of others,

3.) to develop your appreciation of how knowledge is acquired, and

4.) to prepare you for your future courses in geographic data analysis (425 and 426 for example).

By the end of this course, you will come to appreciate the diversity of methods in geography, the appropriateness of different methods for different research questions, and the standards by which each method should be evaluated. Keywords: research design, geography, quantitative, qualitative

 

 

 

 

GEOG 317  ( “additional methods” requirement)

GIS and Statistics (5)

 

 

Suzanne Withers

 

Daily, 10:30-11:20

Provides a conceptual and practical introduction to spatial data analysis and geographic information systems in human geography. The goal is to provide a practical understanding of the application of data analysis to geographic problem solving. Emphasis is placed on the appropriate selection of methods to analyze geographic data, procedures for research design, and interpretation of results. The student will gain practical experience via weekly assignments that require the application of spatial data analysis to specific geographic research questions using SPSS and ArcMap software. Topics include descriptive and inferential methods, spatial patterns and statistics, correlation and spatial autocorrelation. Priority is given to the application and interpretation of methods, over the technical nature of these techniques. There are two main objectives to this course: comprehension and application.

Comprehension: By the end of the course students will be able to read and comprehend reports and research in Human Geography.   Students will have a working knowledge of the main techniques and procedures used within the discipline, such that they can interpret and understand the literature, critically.

Application: By the end of the course students will be able to independently integrate data analysis and GIS. Students will have gained experience applying and interpreting various quantitative methods.

As well the course aims to: 1) introduce students to the distinct challenges of spatial data and geocoded information; 2) help students integrate geographic information science and quantitative methods;  3) help students visualize spatial distributions and variations; 4) prepare students for the study of more advanced quantitative methods; and 5) ground students in the theoretical | methodological | substantive trilogy of geographic research.

 

GEOG 335 (5 credits)   EES  GHD

The Developing World

 

 

Joe Hannah

 

TTh 2:30-4:20

Characteristics and causes, external and internal, of Third World development and obstacles to that development, with a critical development focus. Special attention to social processes, disasters and disaster recovery, NGO’s, resource development, and geopolitics, drawing on specific case studies from the Middle East, Africa,  and Latin America and the Caribbean.

 

 

GEOG 350    (5)      “W” course      EES

 

Geographies of Marketing and Retail

Andy Wenzl

 

 

TTh  9:30-11:20

Even in the age of the seemingly “placeless” internet, marketing, distribution, and retailing remain fundamentally geographic activities.  To whom are what services and products marketed?  How do physical products get from producer to consumer?  What demographic and regulatory issues influence the location and layout of retail outlets?  The answers to all these questions rely on geographical differences, analyses, and perceptions.  Students will use readings, discussion, exercises, and small research projects to increase awareness of these differences, analyses, and perceptions. Keywords: consumption, geodemographics, market areas, marketing, retailing, site selection, store location

 

 

GEOG 360  (5)     GHD,  GMS

 

Principles of GIS MappingLuke Bergmann

 

MWF 10:30-12:20  Labs MW or TTh

Introduces students to the methods of making maps using geographic information systems (GIS) and to the basics of cartography that go into making those maps. Using both cartographic theory and practical approaches, this course focuses on principles of data representation and map design for thematic mapping. Students will complete hands-on assignments throughout the quarter to gain experience using GIS, making a number of different kinds of thematic maps.  No prior GIS experience is necessary, but this course assumes students are familiar with using personal computers, particularly with the Microsoft Windows operating system.

Geog 370 (5)   EES  GHD

 

Problems in Resource Management

 

Craig ZumBrunnen

 

MW, 2:30-4:20

Intended  to help students become more effective participants in environmental decision making as citizens and professionals.  Students can expect to learn about: 1) basic economic concepts as applied to natural resource management; 2) a survey history of American resource use controversies and practices; 3) a critical review of the methods/tools of benefit-cost analysis including risk analysis; 4) major ecosystem concepts and processes; 5) natural and human processes associated with water, air usage and pollution; 6) natural (e.g., thermodynamic) and human-economic processes and problems bearing on local, national and global energy use; 7) the strengths and shortcomings of various strategies and policies for environmental and resource protection; and 8) some appreciation for the complexities involved in the controversies surrounding the concept(s) of “sustainable development.” The primary methods of instruction which will be employed include: 1) lecture and class discussions, 2) 3CM and other group experiential learning processes, 3) small group activities and issue debates, 4) introduction to benefit-cost & cost-effective analyses, and 5) possibly some videos and short field trips.  It should be strongly emphasized that the purpose and perspective of this course is as much to develop critical thinking and questioning skills as it is to convey a specific body of information. Accordingly, expect this class to generate more questions than answers.  You should take this course if you are interested in an environmental career, or simply want to be a more informed citizen. Keywords: ecosystems, environment, economics.

 

 

GEOG 380  (“W” Course)  (5)   EES, GHD

Geographic Patterns of Health& Disease

 

Jonathan Mayer

 

TTh 4:30-6:20 pm, plus Th quiz sectionsGeography of infectious and chronic diseases at local, national, and international scales; environmental, biological, cultural, and social explanations of those variations. Special emphasis is given to the social, cultural, epidemiologic and  geographic issues surrounding HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, waterborne diseases, and urban slum health, as well as the issues surrounding the neglected tropical diseases a (NTDs), which have moved to the forefront of public policy, epidemiologic research, and vaccine/medication development. Finally, we will study the coexistence of infectious diseases and chronic diseases in developing countries, leading to a reconsideration of whether there is such a phenomenon of the “epidemiologic transition” in contemporary societies. Much of the reading and discussion is of rapidly developing research that has just recently emerged, and we will read and consider this research, rather than read “about” the research.

 

 

GEOG 426/ Geog 526   “W” course

Advanced Quantitative Methods (5)  “additional methods” requirement

 

Suzanne Withers

 

 

MWF 1:30-2:50

Provides a conceptual and practical introduction to elementary spatial statistics and advanced statistical techniques in quantitative human geography. Methods reviewed include geographic applications of multiple regression analysis, elementary spatial statistics and spatial autocorrelation, factor analysis, discriminant analysis, logistic regression and geographically weighted regression techniques. Priority is given to the interpretation and application of methods, rather than the technical nature of these techniques. Students will learn to apply these methods using various statistical and GIS software. The course aims to expose students to the breadth of quantitative methods found in Human Geographic research; help students integrate geographic information science and quantitative methods; prepare students for the study of more advanced quantitative methods; and ground students in the theoretical | methodological | substantive trilogy in geographic research.  Recommended: GEOG 326.

 

 

 

 

 

GEOG 435     CCM, EES, GHD

Industrialization & Urban China (5)

Kam Wing Chan

TTh 11:30-1:20 pm

 

This course examines the relationships between economic development and spatial development in post-1949 China. China was once held up as a model for developing countries. In this course we will examine post-1949 Chinese dual economy and society, industrialization strategy and resulting socioeconomic and spatial impacts. The course focuses on a set of related issues: industrial location, rural industrialization, the hukou system, urbanization policies, rural-urban relations, migration and urban development. Students will gain a deeper understanding the complex issues of industrialization and urbanization in a transitional economy now closely linked to the world. Prerequisite: Geog 236 or 336, or a background course on contemporary China.  Students are expected to have a basic knowledge of China.  Keywords: China, development, economics, industry, cities, migration, labor, globalization

GEOG 469   (5)  GMS

GIS Workshop

 

Tim Nyerges

 

TTh 12;30-2:20

As the capstone experience in our GIS curriculum, the goal of this course is for you to become an independent and effective GIS user who can develop and use GIS databases for spatial analysis and problem solving, meeting the needs of project partners. The course is an intensive workshop that involves hands-on experience in which student teams will develop GIS analysis and applications in collaboration with local partners (who may be from the University, community agencies, or local government). You will be involved in a range of tasks associated with GIS application: working with your team members and project partners to identify project goals, acquiring and preparing spatial data for GIS analysis, communicating with clients to assess progress, managing spatial data, and producing necessary maps and analyses. In lecture and readings, we will examine GIS project management strategies (in a variety of organizational and application contexts), and concepts and skills for data acquisition, data preparation, and database design. Please note: To enroll in this course, Geography 462 or 461 required (or equivalent GIS experience) Qualified non-geography majors should email rroth@u. to get on waiting list.

 

 

GEOG 474 (5)    CCM   “W” course

 

Geography & The Law

Brandon Derman

 

TTh 9:30-11:20

 

Explores the intersections of law, geography, and society. Topics include social and environmental justice, political power and activism, and the construction of legal norms in the international context.  The course is structured as a seminar, emphasizing discussion and written work engaged with a set of key readings.  Keywords: social justice, environmental justice, law, political geography, power, activism, the transnationa

 

GEOG  479  CCM

Ethnicity in US Cities (5)

 

Mark Ellis

MWF, 9:30-10:20

 

Investigates the racial and ethnic geography of US cities.  Topics include residential segregation, immigrant settlement geography, spatial assimilation, geographies of diversity and multiculturalism, geographies of mixed-race couples and multiraciality.  The course is a mixture of lectures and class discussions based on weekly readings.  Keywords: race, ethnicity, immigration, segregation, diversity.

 

 

 

GEOG 480  (W)   (5)  EES, GHD

Environmental Geography, Climate and Health

Jonathan Mayer

 

TTh 1:30-3:20

 

Demonstrates and investigates how human-environment relations are expressed in the context of health and disease. Local and global examples demonstrate the power of systems thinking uniting  at the intersection of the social, physical, and biological sciences. Examines interactions between individual health, public health, and social, biological, and physical phenomena.  Specific examples include global climate change/ climate variability and its actual an anticipated effects on many health conditions. We also consider health; air pollution and respiratory diseases with an emphasis on cancer and asthma; environmental contamination with lead and adverse effects on child health and child development; industrial pollution of the environment and cancers. Reading includes primary research articles, and there is an emphasis on study design and methods of analysis. More broadly, we examine the nature of evidence and causality, and contrast (social) scientific criteria for proving causation with legal considerations in disease causality. Formal study designs, the nature of proof, and ways of testing hypotheses about causal relationships and association are prominent in the course.  Prerequisite: Geog 280 or Geog 380 or epidemiology course.

GEOG 490 (6)  CCM, EES ,GHD,GMS

The Seattle Region

 

Sarah Elwood

MW, 2:30-4:20

 

In this field-based urban geography course, we will study the social, cultural, ecological, political, and economic systems and structures that make up the Greater Seattle region, guided by conceptual frames such as neoliberal urbanism, relational poverty, and critical race theory. Significant class time (and out-of-class time) will be spent on student-directed field research projects involving collection and analysis of quantitative and qualitative data from participant observation, archival and public records, photography, GIS, and other visual methods. Prequisite: Geog 315.

.

Geog 526   “W” course—see Geog 426 description

 

 

GEOG 553 (5)

Seminar: Advanced Topics in Cultural Geog.

Katharyne Mitchell

Thursday,  2:30-5:20 pm

Please email instructor for course description at kmitch@u.washington.edu

 

Geog 560, Geog 569—see Geog 360 & 469 descriptions.

 

 

Geog 571

Research Seminar: Critical Ecologies

Luke Bergmann

W, 2:30-5:20

 

Geog 575

Research Seminar: Advanced Political Geography

Matt Sparke

M, 2:30-5:20

Release 1.0,

rr

2/1//12

 

GEOGRAPHY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, Winter, 2012

 

*******************************************************************

Tracks: Cities, Citizenship & Migration (CCM); Environment, Economics & Sustainability (EES); Globalization, Health & Development (GHD); GIS, Mapping & Society (GMS)

 

 

 

Geog 180 Intro to Global Health Sparke GHD
Geog 236 Develop, & Challenge in Greater China Chan EES, GHD
Geog 245 US Population Withers CCM, GMS
Geog 270 Development & The Environment Bergmann EES, GHD
Geog 302 The Pacific Northwest Beyers CCM, EES
Geog 310 Immigrant America Rivers CCM, GMS
Geog 326 Quantitative Methods Chan Methods
Geog 331 Poverty, Care & Responsibility Lawson CCM, GHD
Geog 342 Geographies of Inequality England CCM, EES, GHD
Geog 349 International Trade Wenzl EES, GHD
Geog 425 Qualitative Methods Hannah Methods
Geog 445 Geography of Housing Withers CCM, EES
Geog 461/561 Urban GIS Elwood CCM, GMS
Geog 464/564 GIS-Based Decision Making Nyerges EES, GMS
Geog 467 Law, Justice & The Environment Herbert EES
Geog 471 Methods of Resource Analysis ZumBrunnen CCM, EES
Geog 495 Critical Cartography & Global Health Hannah GHD, GMS
Geog 521 Research Seminar: Critical Cartographies Elwood Graduate research seminar
Geog 525 Advanced Qualitative Methods in Geog England Graduate methods course
Geog 532 Rural Development Seminar Jarosz Graduate research seminar

 

GEOG 180 (5)Intro to Global Health

 

Matt Sparke

 

TTh 9:30-11:20, plus weekly quiz section

Introduces global health by putting its contemporary definition, determinants, development and direction as a field into a broad global context. The class is divided into four core topics: i) the burden and distribution of disease and mortality; ii) the determinants of global health disparities; iii) the development of global health policies; and, iv) the outcomes of global health interventions. All are examined in relation to wider patterns of global interdependency, highlighting how both global health disparities and global health policy responses are themselves shaped by global ties and tensions. Class assignments and grading: Reading, class participation, research project organized around a modified application to the Global Fund for AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. Midterm, final, and country-based global health research project presented in the form of a modified application to the Global Fund for AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria

 

 

GEOG 236 (5)Development and Challenge in Greater China

Kam Wing Chan

 

TTh 1:30-3:20, Qz sec. Mondays

Broad survey of an important region of the world – the Greater China, consisting of mainland China, Taiwan and Hong Kong. Development in mainland China in the last two decades has brought about one of the biggest improvements in human welfare anywhere at any time; yet the country is also beset by many difficult problems that threaten to disrupt stability and derail economic development. Many China’s issues are of global concern but they are often not well presented in the media. This course helps students gain an understanding of this complex Asian power through studying the geography of development process and its present problems. Mainland China’s economic development and participation in the global economy are also closely linked to Hong Kong and Taiwan. The course first introduces background on China’s physical geography, history, and economic and political systems, and then focuses on major geographical issues in China’s development: agriculture, population, industry and trade, and economic and political relations among the three players. The course helps students develop perspectives for understanding the challenges brought by globalization and internal changes China is facing.  Students will complete a short research paper through using online and library materials. No prior background knowledge of China is required. Keywords: China, physical geography, development, globalization, agriculture, population, industry, Hong Kong, Taiwan

 

GEOG 245   (5 credits)US Population

Suzanne Withers

 

TTh, 1:30-3:20, plus Wed. quiz section

Provides an understanding of the geographic variation of the diversity of America’s population. This course advances a demographic perspective towards understanding social change. Students will gain an understanding of the connections between population processes (temporal and spatial) and societal dynamics and diversity. The course examines such topics as the history of U.S. immigration policy, understanding racial differences in mortality, the concept of ‘race’ and its treatment in the U.S. census over time, political redistricting and affirmative gerrymandering, measures of segregation and variations in the internal migration of populations. Students will come away from the class with: (1) a practical understanding of population processes (fertility, mortality, and migration); (2) knowledge of the geographic variation in population structure and characteristics; (3) knowledge of the sources of data for demographic research; (4) experience using geographic information systems for geodemographic analysis; and (5) an appreciation for the demographic underpinnings of contemporary social issues. As such, this course provides an introduction to the field of population geography.

 

Geog 270 (5)

Geographies of International Development & the Environment

Luke Bergmann

 

MWF 9:30-10:20, plus Th quiz section

How is your life linked to lives and environments in distant parts of the world? What might international development mean? This course takes a concrete and introductory approach to exploring large, abstract questions. We will explore some ways in which development in different areas (such as China, Africa, or the US) may be connected—both among themselves and to certain global environmental concerns: water, oil, or carbon, for example. Along the way, other questions might come up: How do ideas differ about development? In practice, who wins and who loses? Can we respond to contemporary economic and ecological crises by rethinking development, environment and their connections? Keywords: Development, Environment, Climate, Global Environmental Change, Globalization

 

GEOG 280 (5 credits)

Geography and Health

 

Jonathan Mayer

TTh 11:30 am-1:20 pm; quiz sec. M & W

Considers the relevance of geography to social issues of health and health care in the United States, other developed countries, and developing countries; the structure of health care system as social and political institutions; geographical concepts of health and disease. The course will include lectures, guest lectures, films and quiz sections. (Optional linked writing course.) Keywords:Global health, infectious disease, medical geography, health services, biopsychosocial influences on health

GEOG 302 (3* credits)

The Pacific Northwest

 

Bill Beyers

MWF 8:30-9:20 am

Settlement patterns in the Pacific Northwest, emphasizing economic and historical factors, including the location of resource-oriented industries, policies regarding the use of public lands, and bases of the development of major urban areas in the region.  * Note: This is a 3-credit course; however, students wishing to write an extra paper can register for an additional 2 credits of Geog 499. See Geog advisers for details. Keywords: public lands, agriculture, forest products, high tech, historical development processes, growth management

 

 

 

GEOG 310  (5)

Immigrant America

Natasha Rivers

TTh, 3:30-5:20

Examines U.S. immigration trends and policies from a geographic perspective. Topics include where immigrants come from, where they settle in the United States. immigrant employment enclaves, the effects of U.S. immigration policy on immigrant settlement and employment patterns, illegal immigration, citizenship, and barriers to immigrant success in the United States keywords: migration, refugees, assimilation, citizenship, settlement geographies

GEOG  326       (5 credits)

Quantitative Methods in Geography

 

Kam Wing Chan

MWF 11:30-22:20 pm, quiz sec. Wed.

Introduction to quantitative methods in geography with a focus on, but not limited to, statistical techniques. Through this course, students will develop an understanding of basic concepts, reasoning and procedures in quantitative methods used in geography. Topics covered include basic descriptive statistics, sampling, inference statistics, and correlation. The course helps develop skills in using and analyzing statistical data in the broader context of geographic applications and research.  Keywords: statistics, methods, analysis, research

GEOG 331

Geographies of Poverty, Care & Responsibility (5)

 

Vicky Lawson

TTh, 11:30-1:20

Explores causes and patterns of global poverty and links this with the urgent need for care and care ethics in our lives and in society broadly.  The course connects academic inquiry on the interconnections between global poverty with the theory and practice of care ethics and caring practices through a research project or through service-learning in the community.  We will examine how care work is being intensified and simultaneously devalued, we will explore the ways in which care is a public rather than a private matter and we will think about our responsibilities to care for those who are near and those who are across the globe.  Students will learn about the possibilities and challenges of caring across distance (geographical and social) and about how to respectfully engage with people in different places.  Finally, we will explore current efforts to construct alternative ways of caring for our society and our world.  Learning Goals: i) understand geographical patterns and causes of global poverty; ii) learn about geographies of care in a global context; iii) conduct either a research project or service-learning/action research to think through concepts of collective responsibility to society. Keywords; Global poverty, care, care ethics, responsibility.

 

GEOG 342 (5)

Geographies of Inequality

 

Kim England

TTh 11:30-1:20

What roles do poverty and social/economic polarization play in capitalist societies such as the USA?  Why are certain groups ‘excluded’ from ‘mainstream’ social life?  Why is there uneven access to jobs? housing? education?  These questions, among others are addressed in this course.  Particular emphasis is placed on the US experience, although examples are drawn from other regions of the world, especially Canada and the UK. Prerequisites: Must be of sophomore standing or higher. Social Science background recommended, some geography background recommended. Keywords: inequality, poverty, wealth, exclusion, social justice, diversity, social/economic restructuring

 

Geog 349  (5)

Geographies of International Trade

 

Andy Wenzl

MW, 3:30-5:20

Increasing international trade of goods and services, the global spatial division of labor, and increasingly mobile financial capital among economies has produced a dynamic geography of international trade.  The manner in which international trade and investment shape, and are shaped by, regions in the global economy are highlighted through a number of perspectives, including the lens of neo-classical trade theory and new critiques.  The course examines the dynamic geography of trade and capital flows, and their impact on regions, economic structure, labor, environment, and health.  Global supply chain and demand dynamics are considered from the perspective of the firm, the region, and the global economy.  Impacts of policy are also highlighted, including an understanding of the basis for and challenges related to non-governmental organizations such as the WTO and World Bank. Keywords: world geography, international trade, economic development, trade policy

GEOG 425 (5 credits)

Qualitative Methods in Geography

 

Joe Hannah

TTh, 1:30-3:20

Qualitative methods are important tools in Geographical research, enabling researchers to explore important issues such as human-environment relationships, the social production of space and place, and the spatial production of the social world. In this course we will introduce students to a variety of qualitative methodologies relevant to human geography based-inquiry.  Fundamental to the broader research process is an understanding of how knowledge is produced, what “counts” as knowledge, and the politics of knowledge production itself. During this course, you will 1) expand and deepen your knowledge of qualitative research methodologies; 2) practice the use of qualitative research techniques; and 3) learn about and discuss current issues in qualitative methodology including research ethics, representation and positionality.  Keywords: qualitative methodologies, feminist theory, ethnography, interviewing

 

GEOG 445 (5)   “W” course

The Geography of Housing

 

Suzanne Withers

WF, 12:30-2:20

Focuses on the geography of housing, especially in the United States. Topics include: the American dream of home ownership; housing affordability and differential access to home ownership; homelessness; public housing; housing demography; residential mobility and neighborhood change, and discrimination in the housing market. Special attention is given to the recent boom and bust of the housing market. Keywords: homelessness, home ownership, discrimination, suburbanization, gated communities, race, United States

 

GEOG 461 (5 credits)

Urban Geographic Information Systems

 

Sarah Elwood

T Th 9:30-11:20 am; labs TTh or MW

Introduces concepts and application skills for GIS-based analysis of urban/regional issues. Includes data sources/acquisition, preparation/coding, analysis, representation, and communication. Prerequisite: 2.0 in GEOG 360; recommended: GEOG 277. Keywords: the city, GIS, spatial analysis, spatial data, urban planning and policy, access, social justice

 

GEOG 464 (5 credits)

GIS-Based  Decision Support

 

Tim Nyerges

MWF  12:30-1:20, plus TTH or MW labs

 

Designed as a learning experience about “GIS methods” in the context of urban and regional planning, programming and implementation-level processes to address land use, transportation and water resource concerns, particularly from a decision support perspective.  The course makes use of concepts from planning, improvement programming, and implementation-level (PPI) work to inform the process of GIS methods. The course makes use of issues in land use, transportation, or water resources (LUTWR) to focus the substantive context of GIS work.  We treat PPI processes and LUTWR substance within the context of GIS methods in an integrative way.  This perspective leads us to issues about urban growth management in connection with community and regional sustainability in connection with approaches to integrative resource management, particularly from a decision support perspective. GIS, as an information technology, and particularly a decision support technology in a broad sense will mature, if we challenge it to address complex and demanding problems.  Furthermore, we will not develop our own expertise unless we challenge ourselves to use GIS technology in complex ways.  Group-based decision support of LUTWR within PPI processes is among the more complex and important topics in the 21st century – because the integration of these ideas can be a practical (as well as theoretical) foundation for addressing growth management and sustainability concerns. This course is taught at an intermediate level. Consequently, students are expected to have taken at least a beginning level course in computer-assisted cartography or GIS, and have some exposure and interest in urban studies topics.

The fundamental learning objectives for students in this course are to:

  • understand the intellectual benefits and costs of integrated data processing strategies with GIS, particularly within the context of urban-regional growth management and sustainability issues. These strategies include (but are not limited to) problem definition, database design, data collection, data structuring, data analysis, and information presentation in a modeling approach.
  • master the use of several GIS data processing strategies as applied through hands-on use of GIS software to complete laboratory assignments as practice in critical enquiry.
  • experience the process of working in groups in order to encourage a broader and deeper understanding about the value of using geographic information to address complex urban-regional geographic issues within a context of a pluralistic society, i.e., a society that mediates multi-valued interests for overall improvement.

Required Reading:

– Nyerges, T. and Jankowski, P. Regional and Urban GIS: A Decision Support Approach (RUGIS), Guilford Publications.

– Selected readings – available through various web sites as indicated by specific URL, and other readings available through UW Library electronic reserves (marked in schedule as ERES):    https://eres.lib.washington.edu/

Grading:

– Two exams containing short answer essay questions (each worth 25% of grade; 50% of total grade)

– Six lab assignments plus a final project with presentation (50% of total grade).

– An extra lab assignment is required for students taking the course for graduate credit as Geog 564.

Software to be used in Geography’s Sherman Lab in Smith 401: ArcGIS 9.3.1 running on Windows XP operating system. Software is also available on workstations in the Smith 411 Commons Room and in Smith 415C Geography Collaboratory.

GEOG 467 (5)

Law, Justice and the Environment

 

Steve Herbert

TTh 9:30-11:20

Examines the role law plays in shaping environmental policy. Challenges student to understand how environmental concerns are translated into legal discourse, and covers typical issues that emerge in environmental law. Centers on active discussions.  Keywords: environment, law, justice

 

GEOG 471 (5)   “W” course

Methods of Resource Analysis

 

Craig ZumBrunnen

MW, 9:30-11:20

Focuses primarily on optimization techniques, especially linear, integer and mixed integer programming using LINGO™ on Window PCs (or LINDO™ software on Windows PCs, or MAC PCs). Explores some mixed-attribute, multiple- attribute, and multiple-objective, techniques.  Assumes that the student has studied neither the calculus nor matrix algebra.   Rather than presenting purely a “cook book” or “canned” approach, students will be exposed to both the theory and mathematics behind the methods prior to using the various computer programs available on both mainframes and micros.  The goal of the course is to impart a good operational knowledge of various analytical tools that can be applied to resource management as well as other geographic problems. In addition to geographic research in general, this class should prove valuable to the individual interested in  professional world with a public or private employer dealing with resource management/ development  issues. As much theory as possible will precede method so that the student gains an appreciation of the appropriate context in which to apply a given technique. Students are expected to attend all classes, do the  assigned reading, and complete all assigned exercises and exams on time.

GRADING: Graded exercises 100%.

REFERENCE Text: Linus Schrage’s (L), Optimization Modeling with LINGO 5th edition.

Chicago: LINDO Systems Inc., 2003.  [DON’T PURCHASE as it is downloadable for free!!]

SOFTWARE: free download ofLINGO Version 11.0:

http://www.lindo.com/index.php?option=com_

content&view=article&id=2&Itemid=10

GEOG 495 (5)

Critical Cartography & Global Health

 

Joe Hannah

MW 1:30-3:20

Combines critical cartography and Global Health studies. Through lecture, discussion, and hands-on projects, we will look behind the outward messages of global health and underneath the taken-for-granted authority embodied in the visual message of the map to get a more nuanced understanding of how both work. This is a “theory-based”class: we will be using theory to look “under the hood” at interests, strategies, and worldviews that are employed in both global health and cartographic practice, and how these materially affect different policies and outcomes. The emphasis of this class is less on learning “facts,” and more on learning concepts and ways of looking at claims that help us understand how power and politics are deployed toward specific ends. (Please note: this is NOT a GIS course.)  Keywords: critical cartography, global health, knowledge production, discourse theory

 

GEOG 521 (5)

Research Seminar: Critical Cartographies

 

Sarah Elwood

W, 2:30-5:20

Examines theoretical and methodological foundations and practices of critical GIS research; considers philosophical and practical considerations in mixed methods research that incorporates GIS and other spatial technologies. Prerequisite: graduate status in geography or related field.

GEOG 525 (5)

Advanced Qualitative Methods

 

Kim England

Mon, 2:30-5:20

Examines why and how qualitative methods can be used to pursue research in geography. Includes consideration of theoretical, ethical and political issues that arise with qualitative methods. Offers considerable practice in such methods as ethnography, focus groups, interviewing, discourse & content analyses, narrative analysis, and archival analysis.

GEOG 532 (5)

Rural Development Seminar

 

Lucy Jarosz

W, 2:30-5:20

This year’s seminar focuses upon the intellectual history of political ecology from its roots in rural development in the Global South to its more recent forays into  questions in the Global North in urban environments and questions involving climate change and human rights.   We will examine the intersections of political ecology with critical development studies, postcolonial theory and feminist theory while emphasizing the themes of agriculture and food.

 

Geog 561 (5 credits)

Urban Geographic Information Systems

Sarah Elwood

 

T Th 9:30-11:20 am; labs TTh or MW

Introduces concepts and application skills for GIS-based analysis of urban/regional issues. Includes data sources/acquisition, preparation/coding, analysis, representation, and communication.  Prerequisite: 2.0 in GEOG 560. Convened with Geography 461. Students enrolled for graduate credit will complete additional reading and writing assignments, designed in consultation with the instructor.

 

GEOG 564 (5)

GIS-Based Decision Support

 

Tim Nyerges

MW, 12:30-2:20, plus T labs

See description for Geog 464. Graduate students will be expected to do additional coursework.

 

RR/11/4/11

Autumn 2011 Geography Courses

 

 

Course # Course Title Instructor
123 Intro to Globalization Sparke
205 Intro to Physical Environment ZumBrunnen
207 Economic Geography Harrington
230 Global Inequality Lawson
315 Explanation & Understanding in Geography Ortega
360 Principles of GIS Mapping Elwood
370 Problems in Resource Management ZumBrunnen
371 World Hunger & Agricultural Development Jarosz
431 Geography & Gender Lopez
433 Resource Use in Russia ZumBrunnen
440 Regional Economic Analysis Beyers
462 Coastal GIS Nyerges
476 Women & The City England
478 Social Justice in the City Burnett
500 History of Geographic Thought Mitchell
553 Cultural Geog Research Seminar: Care Ethics Lawson
560 Principles of GIS Mapping Elwood
562 Coastal GIS Nyerges
580 Medical Geography Proseminar Mayer

 

 

 

  • Cities, Citizenship and Migration  (CCM)
  • Environment, Economy and Sustainability  (EES)
  • GIS, Mapping and Society (GMS)
  • Globalization, Health and Development (GHD)

GEOG 123   (5)  Intro to Globalization        CCM, EES, GHD

Matt Sparke

TTh 8:30-9;20; F 10:30-12:20

quiz section on MW or Th

 

(Note: counts towards Geography major, CHID major, Latin American Studies major, and as a requirement for the International Studies major.)

 

Where does your food come from? Who makes your clothes? What does your bank do with your money? Who are you connected to through your work? Why was the ‘Battle in Seattle’ about more than just Seattle? How are people networking and moving around the world in new ways? How do these networks and movements change politics locally and globally? Why does increasing global interconnectedness also seem to lead to greater division and greater inequality? Why is national security said to depend on the defense of free trade and private property? How are we all connected together, and who are “we”? This course aims to help you start answering these sorts of questions by examining globalization in all its diverse forms of worldwide interconnection. Such interconnections include economic ties, political ties, cultural ties, environmental ties and media ties. These ties can be analyzed independently, but they also need to be understood in terms of how they operate in conjunction with one another to produce the overall effect that has been given the single label “globalization”. When it is talked about in this singular way, globalization often seems overpowering and unstoppable. However, by learning about each set of ties in turn you will be able to see globalization as something less monolithic, something that is being contested and reworked, something that ties the world together in a range of both constraining and empowering ways, something that is constantly changing and something that therefore can also be changed.

KEYWORDS:  globalization, neoliberalism, free trade, multinational corporations

 

 

 

GEOG 205       (5 credits)   Intro to the Physical Environment EES

Craig ZumBrunnen

 

MTWTh  lecture,  11:30-12:20, quiz sec F

We live on an extraordinary planet. The activities and conveniences of modern civilization often dull our sensitivity to the miraculous workings of our planet. The majority of us spend most of our time indoors, living in cities, and because of this our dependence on natural processes is not very obvious.  This reduced sensitivity to nature in our everyday lives is a downside of civilization.  On the positive side, over the past couple of decades the application of scientific methods has yielded an explosion of knowledge about the earth.  Accordingly, the objective of this course is to provide you with a broad introduction to a spectrum of dynamic knowledge about the Earth and the impact of humans upon it, such as global warming. We believe that the better you understand the Earth, the more you will be sensitive to it, the more you will appreciate it, and the more you will wonder about it. Renewed appreciation, and particularly a rekindled sense of wonder, can help motivate all of us to live more carefully within the limits of our remarkable planetary home.

I hope to be able to achieve our objective by making use of selected aspects and processes of the physical environment and selected examples of human-environmental interaction.  Emphasis will be placed upon the processes that account for the spatial patterns and geomorphic forms of the various elements that constitute the earth’s physical environment.  In this respect, the first half of the course will focus upon geomorphic materials, agents, processes, landforms and their geographical distribution; while the second half will focus upon atmospheric phenomena, climatic elements, processes and their geographical patterns.  At appropriate times practical lab skill exercises will be used both to reinforce the lecture material and to present new and/or additional material.  Topographic map reading and interpretation will also be introduced at appropriate times in the class. Keywords: systems, tectonics, lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere

 

 

GEOG 207   (5)      Economic Geography        EES

J.W. Harrington

 

MWF 10:30-11:20 am, plus Th quiz section

What’s where; how does it affect our lives and why?  Think about this in terms of economic activities, and you’ve got the purpose of Geography 207. This course is an introduction to and overview of economic geography: patterns, trends, and theories of the geographic arrangement and interaction of economic resources, activities, and institutions.  We’ll cover principles used to understand location and interaction at the intra-urban, interregional, and international scales.  Given this broad sweep of material, the course is relevant to students pursuing studies in geography, economics, planning, business, and regional studies. The course format entails lecture and lecture notes, assigned reading, three empirical case studies, weekly review/discussion section, two 50-minute tests and a final examination.  Your writing of the case results makes this into a Writing course.  No prerequisites — we’ll introduce economic and geographic principles as we need them. Keywords:

GEOG 230  (5)    Global Inequality              CCM, GH

Vicky Lawson

MTWTh 9:30-10:20 am, plus Th or F quiz

Explores geographies of inequality around the globe.  We will discuss the connections between inequality and international development efforts with a focus on Latin America, Africa and Asia.  Our focus will be on the causes and geographic patterns of social inequality worldwide.  The course begins by reexamining some of the defining themes in debates over development: ‘overpopulation’, migration/immigration, and the production of inequality and poverty.  We discuss the historical legacies of colonialism in Africa, Latin America and Asia, linking these to current debates about ‘development’ – such as state intervention versus free markets.  We will examine global to local forces that shape inequality and will discuss working in the global economy and grassroots networks of political action. Keywords:

 

GEOG 315   (5)     Explanation and Understanding in Geography    “W” course

Andre Ortega

MWF 12:30-1:20 pm, plus TTh quiz sections

The objectives of this course are fourfold:

1.) to design your own geographic research effectively,

2.) to evaluate critically the research designs of others,

3.) to develop your appreciation of how knowledge is acquired, and

4.) to prepare you for your future courses in geographic data analysis (425 and 426 for example).

By the end of this course, you will come to appreciate the diversity of methods in geography, the appropriateness of different methods for different research questions, and the standards by which each method should be evaluated.

GEOG 360  (5)  Principles of GIS Mapping      GHD, GMS

Sarah Elwood

MWF 8:30-9:20 am, Labs MW or TTh

Origins, development, and methods of cartography. Principles of data representation and map design for thematic mapping and spatial analysis. Introduction to principles of geographic information systems (GIS).  Keywords:  GIS, cartography, spatial analysis. Offered jointly with Geography 560.

 

 

 

Geog 371     World Hunger and Agricultural Development (5)      EES    GHD

Lucy Jarosz

 

TTh, 12:30-2:20

Addresses the issues of hunger and poverty in their relation to agricultural development and modernization, food security policy, and the globalization of food and agriculture.  The course’s objectives are to understand how hunger has been historically conceptualized and mapped as a pressing problem; to understand how colonialism and international economic development processes contribute to the hunger; to study the changes in international food security policy and the material outcomes of these policies; to understand the relationship of  the development of the global food system to hunger and to recognize organizations and social movements dedicated to eliminating hunger  through movements encompassing social justice, food sovereignty and rights based approaches to food.  Recommended: GEOG 230, GEOG 330, or GEOG 335. Keywords:  development, agriculture, food, globalization

 

Geog 431  Geography and Gender (5)  CCM,  GHD

Patricia Lopez

 

MW 1:30-3:20

Explore the role of geography and gender through the lenses of war and peace. We will engage with liberation and pacifist movements in the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries with an eye to disrupt gendered notions of violence and peace. We will begin by examining the role of women in the Mexican Revolution and end in current movements both here and abroad.

 

GEOG 433  Resource Use In Russia (5)      EES,  GHD

Craig ZumBrunnen

TTh, 1:30-3:20

Geographic and historical background of the natural resource base of Russia and the Newly Independent States. Geographic and historical perspectives on Soviet natural resource use and management in theory and practice. Implications of the breakup of the USSR for natural resource use and management.

GEOG 440  (“W” Course)  (5)   Regional Analysis  EES

Bill Beyers

MWF 11:30 am – 12:50pm

Covers a number of frequently used methods of regional analysis, including descriptive techniques such as location quotients, coefficients of regional specialization, indices of industrial concentration, and shift-share analysis. Regional economic models are considered in-depth, including economic base models, survey and non-survey regional input-output models, and regional econometric models. Extensions of the accounting systems for these models are considered, including environmental, demographic, and optimization approaches. Descriptive techniques used in regional development studies are also covered. The emphasis is on methods which are frequently used in the “real world” as well as in scholarly research. The course follows up classroom presentations of methods with exercises which provide a learning experience with these techniques. Five exercises will be required, utilizing methods taught in this class.  Students will also form teams to pursue a quarter project, which will be presented to the class during the last week.  There will be a take home final. The exercises will account for 60% of the grade, 20% group project, and 20% take home exam. Keywords:

GEOG 462  (5)   Coastal GIS      EES   GMS

Tim Nyerges

 

MWF 10:30-11:20 am, Labs MW or T Th

Methods of analysis provided by geographic information systems (GIS). Operations on geospatial data, including map overlay, buffers,  neighborhood operations and transformations, and other spatial and attribute data procedures. Exposure to raster and vector software, but  particular emphasis on raster operations. Data sets associated with coastal areas are used in lab assignments, emphasizing land and water  interfaces as the substantive theme. Keywords:

GEOG  476  (5) Women and The City    CCM

Kim England

 

TTh 10:30-12:20

Offered jointly with GWSS476

Explores the reciprocal relations between subjectivities, gender relations, the layout of cities, and the activities of urban residents. Focus on North America and some European examples. The central theme is that the layout of cities and the activities of the people in cities are gendered (and classed, raced, etc). The class provides a critical appreciation of: (1) the breath and depth of feminist urban geography, and why the field emerged and why it should be studied; (2) some of the major topics addressed by feminist urban geographers; and (3) the types of research strategies employed in the study of feminist urban geographies. Keywords: feminism, work, diversity, safety, housing, planning, urban politics, inequality.

 

GEOG 478  (5) Social Justice and The City   CCM

Instructor:  Becky Burnett

TTh, 2:30-4:20

Designed to help students delve deeper into the social relations that shape cities, both in the US and abroad, in order to develop a greater understanding of the dynamic nature of cities and development. In the course of this class, we will discuss the processes and problems that face cities and their citizens all over the world, and we will do so as geographers, developing an understanding of geographical debates related to cities. This class will focus on debates of the 20th and 21st centuries, looking at the ways in which class, race, gender, wealth, colonialism and resistance all shape the physical and social geographies of cities. Students are expected to already have a working knowledge of the city, and will be expected to challenge themselves as we explore the greatest challenges facing cities today.

 

GEOG 500  (5) Contemporary Geographic Thought

Katharyne Mitchell

M 2:30-5:20 pm

Historical development of modern geography. Emphasis on various philosophical and methodological debates in geography and the contexts from which they emerged. Investigates geography’s foundational concepts and institutions; how they have responded to — and influenced — the world around them.

Geog 553  Research Seminar: Cultural Geography (5)    “Care Ethics”

Vicky Lawson

 

Th, 2:30-5:20

This course explores the centrality of care work and care ethics to our lives and to society broadly.  We will look at how shifts in contemporary society (in the U.S. and across the globe) suggest an urgent need for care (in many senses).  Specifically, we will examine the context for care including:  i) the extension of market relations into almost everything (health care, education, environmental protection, elder-care etc.; ii) the systematic devaluation of care-work; iii) pervasive discourses of personal responsibility (for poverty, inner city decline, unemployment, etc.); and iv) withdrawal of state supports in many crucial arenas.  The first part of the course will examine theoretical debates on feminist care ethics.  We will then think about the methodological possibilities and challenges of caring across distance and to respectfully engage with people in distant and different places.  Finally, we will explore the myriad theoretical and practical challenges of care ethics: how do we navigate the research/politics boundary; how do we understand ourselves in a global frame; what approaches to research enable a critical and yet analytical view; what do care ethics mean for our professional practices and involvements?  We will think through the challenges of producing innovative and caring knowledge under ethical and responsible relations to people with whom we work.

 

Geog 560, Principles of GIS Mapping  (5)Sarah Elwood

MWF, 8:30-9:20, plus either MW or TTh labs

Graduate students only—see Geog 360 for course description

 

Geog 562 (5)    Coastal GIS

Tim Nyerges

 

MWF, 10:30-11:20, plus MW or TTh labs

Graduate students only

For description, see Geog 462

 

 

GEOG 580 (5) Medical GeographyJonathan Mayer

W,  2:30-5:20 pm

Offered jointly with HSERV 586A

The purpose of this course is to learn the major theories, methods, and debates of this highly interdisciplinary field. Based upon readings, lectures, and class discussions, students can expect to have a broad acquaintance with the field. This can serve either as a basis for research in medical geography, or as an introduction to a medical social science in light of other traditions of geography, social science, and public health. Medical geography is inherently a field of geography, a health-related field of social science, and a subdiscipline of public health.

 

Geography, Spring, 2011 course descriptions

 

• Cities, Citizenship and Migration (CCM)

• Environment, Economy and Sustainability (EES)

• GIS, Mapping and Society (GMS)

• Globalization, Health and Development (GHD)

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

GEOG 205 (5 credits) EES

Physical Environment

Craig ZumBrunnen

MWF lecture, 11:30-12:20, quiz sec Th

We live on an extraordinary planet. The activities and conveniences of modern civilization often dull our sensitivity to the miraculous workings of our planet. The majority of us spend most of our time indoors, living in cities, and because of this our dependence on natural processes is not very obvious. This reduced sensitivity to nature in our everyday lives is a downside of civilization. On the positive side, over the past couple of decades the application of scientific methods has yielded an explosion of knowledge about the earth. Accordingly, the objective of this course is to provide you with a broad introduction to a spectrum of dynamic knowledge about the Earth and the impact of humans upon it, such as global warming. We believe that the better you understand the Earth, the more you will be sensitive to it, the more you will appreciate it, and the more you will wonder about it. Renewed appreciation, and particularly a rekindled sense of wonder, can help motivate all of us to live more carefully within the limits of our remarkable planetary home.

I hope to be able to achieve our objective by making use of selected aspects and processes of the physical environment and selected examples of human-environmental interaction. Emphasis will be placed upon the processes that account for the spatial patterns and geomorphic forms of the various elements that constitute the earth’s physical environment. In this respect, the first half of the course will focus upon geomorphic materials, agents, processes, landforms and their geographical distribution; while the second half will focus upon atmospheric phenomena, climatic elements, processes and their geographical patterns. At appropriate times practical lab skill exercises will be used both to reinforce the lecture material and to present new and/or additional material. Topographic map reading and interpretation will also be introduced at appropriate times in the class.

Keywords: systems, tectonics, lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere

GEOG 208 (5) CCM, GHD

Geography of The World Economy

Stephen Young

MWF 9:30-10:20, Quiz sections Th

Examines the relationship between the globalization of economic activity and regional development. Topics include international trade, colonialism, industrial capitalism, advanced capitalism, and the globalization of labor markets. Keywords: economy, development, globalization, trade, colonialism, history.

GEOG 270 EES, GHD

Geographies of International Development and Environmental Change

Leonie Newhouse

MTWF 10:30-11:20, Qz sec. on T

Examines theories and practices of international development. Students will trace the historical emergence of contemporary development debates, with particular reference to recent work in development geography and to the environment as an issue of global concern. The class will focus on water issues broadly defined—including access to drinking water; agriculture and irrigation; dams and hydropower; water privatization, drought, floods and climate change; and interstate water conflict—to explore the ways in which nature, poverty and development are understood. The class encourages students to make connections between development issues internationally and their own lives. Examples will be drawn from North and Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America and the Middle East. Keywords: Development, Environment, Water, Africa.

GEOG 271 (5) EES, GHD

Geography of Food & Eating

Lucy Jarosz

MTWTh 1:30-2:20 quiz sec. TH & F

Food is something none of us can live without. It is essential for life, and it also shapes our environment and our relationships to other people and places. Where is our food grown and how? Where and what do we eat? How does food identify people and places? These questions are fundamentally geographic. Exploring how food is grown and consumed leads to a deeper understanding of societies and environments and their complex relationships. This course examines food production, distribution, and consumption issues across geographic scales, spanning the microcosm of the individual body to the national and global scales. We explore the political, social, cultural and economic dimensions of food and eating in particular spaces, places, environments, contexts and regions in order to introduce key concepts and modes of analysis in human geography.

Keywords: food, agriculture, sustainability, globalization

GEOG 315 (5) (required for all Geog majors) “W” course

Explanation and Understanding in Geography

Andre Ortega

MWF 9:30-10:20 am, Quiz T Th

The objectives of this course are fourfold:

1.) to design your own geographic research effectively,

2.) to evaluate critically the research designs of others,

3.) to develop your appreciation of how knowledge is acquired, and

4.) to prepare you for your future courses in geographic data analysis (425 and 426 for example).

By the end of this course, you will come to appreciate the diversity of methods in geography, the appropriateness of different methods for different research questions, and the standards by which each method should be evaluated. Keywords: research design, geography, quantitative, qualitative

GEOG 317 ( “additional methods” requirement)

GIS and Statistics (5)

Suzanne Withers

Daily, 10:30-11:20

Provides a conceptual and practical introduction to spatial data analysis and geographic information systems in human geography. The goal is to provide a practical understanding of the application of data analysis to geographic problem solving. Emphasis is placed on the appropriate selection of methods to analyze geographic data, procedures for research design, and interpretation of results. The student will gain practical experience via weekly assignments that require the application of spatial data analysis to specific geographic research questions using SPSS and ArcMap software. Topics include descriptive and inferential methods, spatial patterns and statistics, correlation and spatial autocorrelation. Priority is given to the application and interpretation of methods, over the technical nature of these techniques.

There are two main objectives to this course: comprehension and application. Comprehension: By the end of the course students will be able to read and comprehend reports and research in Human Geography. Students will have a working knowledge of the main techniques and procedures used within the discipline, such that they can interpret and understand the literature, critically. Application: By the end of the course students will be able to independently integrate data analysis and GIS. Students will have gained experience applying and interpreting various quantitative methods.

As well, the course aims to: 1) introduce students to the distinct challenges of spatial data and geocoded information; 2) help students integrate geographic information science and quantitative methods; 3) help students visualize spatial distributions and variations; 4) prepare students for the study of more advanced quantitative methods; and 5) ground students in the theoretical | methodological | substantive trilogy of geographic research.

GEOG 342 (5 credits) CCM,EES, GHD

Geographies of Inequality

Kim England

TTh 11:30-1:20

What roles do poverty and social/economic polarization play in capitalist societies such as the USA? Why are certain groups ‘excluded’ from ‘mainstream’ social life? Why is there uneven access to jobs? housing? education? These questions, among others are addressed in this course. Particular emphasis is placed on the US experience, although examples are drawn from other regions of the world, especially Canada and the UK. Prerequisites: Must be of sophomore standing or higher. Social Science background recommended, some geography background recommended. Keywords: inequality, poverty, wealth, exclusion, social justice, diversity, social/economic restructuring

GEOG 350 (5) “W” course EES

Geographies of Marketing and Retail

JW Harrington

TTh 9:30-11:20

Even in the age of the seemingly “placeless” internet, marketing, distribution, and retailing remain fundamentally geographic activities. To whom are what services and products marketed? How do physical products get from producer to consumer? What demographic and regulatory issues influence the location and layout of retail outlets? The answers to all these questions rely on geographical differences, analyses, and perceptions. Students will use readings, discussion, exercises, and small research projects to increase awareness of these differences, analyses, and perceptions. Keywords: consumption, geodemographics, market areas, marketing, retailing, site selection, store location

GEOG 360 (5) GHD, GMS

Principles of GIS Mapping

Joe Hannah

MWF 11:30-12:20 Labs MW or TTh

This class introduces students to the methods of making maps using geographic information systems (GIS) and to the basics of cartography that go into making those maps. Using both cartographic theory and practical approaches, this course focuses on principles of data representation and map design for thematic mapping. Students will complete hands-on assignments throughout the quarter to gain experience using GIS, making a number of different kinds of thematic maps. No prior GIS experience is necessary, but this course assumes students are familiar with using personal computers, particularly with the Microsoft Windows operating system.

GEOG 380 (“W” Course) (5) EES, GHD

Geographic Patterns of Health

Jonathan Mayer

TTh 4:30-6:20 pm, plus Th quiz sections

Geography of infectious and chronic diseases at local, national, and international scales; environmental, cultural, and social explanations of those variations. Special emphasis is given to the social, cultural, epidemiologic and geographic issues surrounding HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, waterborne diseases, and urban slum health.

GEOG 426/ Geog 526 “W” course

meets “additional methods” requirement

Advanced Quantitative Methods

Suzanne Withers

MW 12:30-2:20

Provides a conceptual and practical introduction to elementary spatial statistics and advanced statistical techniques in quantitative human geography. Methods reviewed include geographic applications of multiple regression analysis, elementary spatial statistics and spatial autocorrelation, factor analysis, discriminant analysis, logistic regression and geographically weighted regression techniques. Priority is given to the interpretation and application of methods, rather than the technical nature of these techniques. Students will learn to apply these methods using various statistical and GIS software. The course aims to expose students to the breadth of quantitative methods found in Human Geographic research; help students integrate geographic information science and quantitative methods; prepare students for the study of more advanced quantitative methods; and ground students in the theoretical | methodological | substantive trilogy in geographic research. Recommended: GEOG 326.

GEOG 431 (5) CCM, GHD

Reading Seminar: Gender, Sexuality and Geography

Michael Brown

F, 9:30-12:20

An advanced reading seminar on the links between gender, sexuality and urban space. We will read 7 urban historical geographies about the emergence of lesbian, gay and queer social movements in several American cities during the 20th Century including: New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Minneapolis, Portland, and especially Seattle. We will explore concepts in urban, political and cultural geography through them. Your assessment will be based on weekly seminar participation, weekly journals, leading at least one seminar and a research paper. Pre-req. Geog. 315 or permission of instructor (michaelb@u.washington.edu). Keywords: urban, political, cultural, gender, sexuality, Seattle.

GEOG 435 CCM, EES, GHD

Industrialization & Urban China (5)

Kam Wing Chan

TTh 11:30-1:20 pm

This course examines the relationships between economic development and spatial development in post-1949 China. China was once held up as a model for developing countries. In this course we will examine post-1949 Chinese dual economy and society, industrialization strategy and resulting socioeconomic and spatial impacts. The course focuses on a set of related issues: industrial location, rural industrialization, the hukou system, urbanization policies, rural-urban relations, migration and urban development. Students will gain a deeper understanding the complex issues of industrialization and urbanization in a transitional economy now closely linked to the world. Prerequisite: Geog 236 or 336, or a background course on contemporary China. Students are expected to have a basic knowledge of China. Keywords: China, development, economics, industry, cities, migration, labor, globalization

GEOG 436/SISA 436 (5) GHD

Social & Political Geographies of South Asia

Amita Baviskar

TTh 1:30-3:20

Introduces the changing social and political geographies of South Asia, tracing how postcolonial state policies have affected social inequalities structured around caste and tribe, religion and religion, class and gender. Analyzes how the historical legacy of colonial rule shaped social identities and national development strategies in independent India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. Looking at the consequences of state policies for urban, agrarian and forest environments and their inhabitants, we will focus on a range of contemporary social movements seeking to transform political life in S. Asia.

GEOG 469 (5) GMS

GIS Workshop

Sarah Elwood

T Th 1:30 – 3:20 pm

As the capstone experience in our GIS curriculum, the goal of this course is for you to become an independent and effective GIS user who can develop and use GIS databases for spatial analysis and problem solving, meeting the needs of project partners. The course is an intensive workshop that involves hands-on experience in which student teams will develop GIS analysis and applications in collaboration with local partners (who may be from the University, community agencies, or local government). You will be involved in a range of tasks associated with GIS application: working with your team members and project partners to identify project goals, acquiring and preparing spatial data for GIS analysis, communicating with clients to assess progress, managing spatial data, and producing necessary maps and analyses. In lecture and readings, we will examine GIS project management strategies (in a variety of organizational and application contexts), and concepts and skills for data acquisition, data preparation, and database design. Please note: To enroll in this course, Geography 462 or 461 required (or equivalent GIS experience) Qualified non-geography majors should email rroth@u. to get on waiting list.

GEOG 480 (W) (5) EES, GHD

Environmental Geography, Climate and Health

Jonathan Mayer

MW 2:30-4:20

Demonstrates and investigates how human-environment relations are expressed in the context of health and disease. Local and global examples emphasize the ways medical geography is situated at the intersection of the social, physical, and biological sciences. Examines interactions between individual health, public health, and social, biological, and physical phenomena. Specific examples include global climate change and health; air pollution and respiratory diseases; environmental contamination with lead and adverse effects on children’s development; industrial pollution of the environment and cancers. Reading includes primary research articles, and there is an emphasis on study design and methods of analysis Prerequisite: geog 280 or Geog 380 or epidemiology course.

GEOG 490 (6) CCM, EES,GHD,GMS

The Seattle Region

Patricia Lopez

MW, 2:30-4:20

We will try to get a handle on the multifaceted and complex concept of “the region,” using the Greater Seattle area as a case study. We will discuss the many systems and structures that make up an urban region – the social, the cultural, the ecological, the political, and the economic. Students will undertake research projects that allow them to gather primary data and to examine change in the landscape. To a considerable degree, the course will be student organized and implemented. The class will divide into small teams, who will on their own explore some aspects of the metropolitan landscape, relate them to principles learned in classes, and report their findings to the larger group. .Significant class time will be spent on student-directed field research projects involving collection and analysis of quantitative and/or qualitative data.

Student learning goals

Articulate and understand the complex set of systems and structures that make up an urban region.

Develop a better understanding of the Greater Seattle region in particular.

Learn about and practice data types and methods of analysis for urban research.

Examine a specific aspect of Seattle’s regional geography through a self-directed field project.

General method of instruction

Lectures, discussions, site visits, fieldwork.

Recommended preparation

This is a senior-level course. Students should have attained upper-division status. Further, they should have preparation for and/or interest in a self-directed research project that will involve 1) defining a problem or question of interest, 2) collecting relevant qualitative and/or quantitative data, 3) describing and analyzing said data in order to produce a research report.

Class assignments and grading

Grades will likely be based on: 1) Weekly ‘lab’ assignments, using skills and data introduced in class. 2) Field research project culminating in a final report 3) participation in class and in group work

GEOG 495 (5) GHD, GMS

Special Topics: Maps and Development

Joe Hannah

TTh, 9:30-11:20

This course brings together two different subtopics in Human Geography: Critical Cartography and Critical Development Studies. In Critical Cartography, we explore how maps are not just neutral representations of our world. Rather, they are tools of rhetoric and discourse, and as such embody particular interests and power relations that are not always obvious. Critical Development Studies looks at how the complex and often contradictory practices of international development embody more than altruism and humanitarianism. These practices contribute to structures of power and interest. This course looks at how maps, map-making, and cartography are used as rhetorical and discursive “texts” and tools in processes of international development, supporting and re-creating powerful interests.

Through lecture, discussion, and hands-on projects, this class will help students look behind the outward messages of international development and underneath the taken-for-granted authority embodied in the visual message of the map. Our purpose is to get a more nuanced understanding of how discourses of authority and international development come together in maps. (Note: This is *not* a GIS course.  No GIS or cartography experience is required.)

GEOG 511 (5 )

Research Design

Michael Brown

T, 12:30-3:20

Intended as a geography foundations course for first-year doctoral students and advanced MA students. The course explores the main debates over the epistemological foundations and theoretical interrogations of geographic description and explanation. It examines such issues as: the ways contemporary geographers use and re-shape theories from outside the discipline; the bases of effective explanation in geography; and, the ethics of abstraction and representation in geographical research. Throughout, the course examines the institutionalization of these debates over epistemology and explanation, both within the discipline and the academy more broadly. Keywords: explanation, abstraction, representation.

Geog 513 (5)

Grant Proposals

Mark Ellis

W 2:30-5:20 (time tentative—may move to mornings)

Students will learn about how to write a compelling proposal. This requires having a good idea with a clearly defined research question or questions that can be understood by researchers not necessarily in your subfield, explaining why the project has intellectual merit and what its broader impacts may be, embedding the research in relevant theory/background literature, having a coherent and manageable research plan that explains as much as possible about how and where you will get your data and how you will analyze it in a manner that will answer your research questions. The process also involves developing a budget, navigating the university and agency maze of forms and approvals, and initiating the process of human subjects approval. Although the course will be geared to writing NSF style proposals the template of content and forms I will use are applicable to many other federal agencies and private foundations. The course is most suitable for geography students who already have a well-developed idea and want to fashion it into a proposal. It is not a course designed to generate or flesh out new ideas. At the end of the term students will have completed a proposal ready to submit to an agency. I will assign grades based on the quality of this proposal.

Geog 526

Advanced Quantitative Methods

meets “methods” requirement for grad students

Suzanne Withers

MW 12:30-2:20

Provides a conceptual and practical introduction to elementary spatial statistics and advanced statistical techniques in quantitative human geography. Methods reviewed include geographic applications of multiple regression analysis, elementary spatial statistics and spatial autocorrelation, factor analysis, discriminant analysis, logistic regression and geographically weighted regression techniques. Priority is given to the interpretation and application of methods, rather than the technical nature of these techniques. Students will learn to apply these methods using various statistical and GIS software. The course aims to expose students to the breadth of quantitative methods found in Human Geographic research; help students integrate geographic information science and quantitative methods; prepare students for the study of more advanced quantitative methods; and ground students in the theoretical | methodological | substantive trilogy in geographic research. Recommended: GEOG 326.

Geog 536/SISSA 536 (5)

Research Seminar: S. Asian Geographies

Amita Baviskar

F, 1:30-4:20

The rapid rise of urbanization in South Asia raises new social, economic, political and ecological challenges. How are increasing demands for rights and resources, changing aspirations and lifestyles, and shifting demographics, negotiated and accommodated? What forms of governance and sociality are being devised to deal with the complex heterogeneity of urban populations? Each city is experienced in multiple, widely-divergent ways by different social groups; what happens when these cities-within-cities converge or collide? How are the categories of caste, class, ethnicity and religion refracted through urban landscapes and lives? This course examines how the politics of urban spaces, resources, and identities are mutually produced in contemporary South Asian cities. It analyzes contentions around creating spatial and social order through ethnographic works that deal with governmentality and globalization; geographies of violence and injustice; informal economies and migration; and urban ecologies. It traces how cities in South Asia act as sites for citizenship and other political claims.

GEOG 553 (5)

Seminar: Advanced Topics in Cultural Geog.

Katharyne Mitchell

Monday, 2:30-5:20 pm

Please email instructor for course description at kmitch@u.washington.edu

Release 2.1,

rr

2/3/11

GEOGRAPHY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, Winter, 2011  release 1.1

GEOG 236 (5 credits)

Development and Challenge in Greater China

Kam Wing Chan

TTh 1:30-3:20, Qz sec. Mondays.

Broad survey course of an important region of the world – the Greater China, consisting of mainland China, Taiwan and Hong Kong. Development in mainland China in the last two decades has brought about one of the biggest improvements in human welfare anywhere at any time; yet the country is also beset by many difficult problems that threaten to disrupt stability and derail economic development. Many China’s issues are of global concern but they are often not well presented in the media. This course helps students gain an understanding of this complex Asian power through studying the geography of development process and its present problems. Mainland China’s economic development and participation in the global economy are also closely linked to Hong Kong and Taiwan. The course first introduces background on China’s physical geography, history, and economic and political systems, and then focuses on major geographical issues in China’s development: agriculture, population, industry and trade, and economic and political relations among the three players. The course helps students develop perspectives for understanding the challenges brought by globalization and internal changes China is facing.  Students will complete a short research paper through using online and library materials. No prior background knowledge of China is required. Keywords: China, physical geography, development, globalizaton, agriculture, population, industry, Hong Kong, Taiwan

 

GEOG 276   (5 credits)

Intro. to Political Geog.    “W course”

Michael Brown

MWF  9:30-10:20, plus Th quiz section

Geopolitics, territoriality, and the state are mainstays of political  geography.  And so we’ll cover them in Geography 276.  But we’ll also Introduce you to recent research on environment, cultural politics, embodiment and care that political geographers are also doing.  So  this course will provide you with a broad survey of a range of topics in the field. It will be organized around the conceptual tools political geographers use to study the world.  Geography 276 will prepare you  for upper-level geography courses, it will allow you to hone your own geographical imagination, and it will stretch your thinking about politics. Keywords: Geopolitics, nationalism, environment, urban politics, social movements, identity, the body.

 

Geog 277 (5)

Intro To Cities

Kim England

MWF 10:30-11:20, plus Th quiz section

Study of 1) systems of cities–their historical development, location, distribution and functions, and 2) their internal structure—the location of activities within cities. Emphasizes explanations of contemporary urban patterns and issues. Keywords: suburbanization, housing, segregation and economic growth.

 

GEOG 280 (5 credits)

Geography and Health

Jonathan Mayer

TTh 11:30 am-1:20 pm; quiz sec. M & W

Considers the relevance of geography to social issues of health and health care in the United States, other developed countries, and developing countries; the structure of health care system as social and political institutions; geographical concepts of health and disease. The course will include lectures, guest lectures, films and quiz sections. (Optional linked writing course.) Keywords: Global health, infectious disease, medical geography, health services, biopsychosocial influences on health

GEOG 302 (3* credits)

The Pacific Northwest

Bill Beyers

MWF 8:30-9:20 am

Settlement patterns in the Pacific Northwest, emphasizing economic and historical factors, including the location of resource-oriented industries, policies regarding the use of public lands, and bases of the development of major urban areas in the region.  * Note: This is a 3-credit course; however, students wishing to write an extra paper can register for an additional 2 credits of Geog 499. See Geog advisers for details. Keywords: public lands, agriculture, forest products, high tech, historical development processes, growth management

GEOG  326 (5 credits)

Quantitative Methods in Geography

 

Kam Wing Chan

MWF 1:00-2:20 pm, quiz sec. Wed.

Introduction to quantitative methods in geography with a focus on, but not limited to, statistical techniques. Through this course, students will develop an understanding of basic concepts, reasoning and procedures in quantitative methods used in geography. Topics covered include basic descriptive statistics, sampling, inference statistics, and correlation. The course helps develop skills in using and analyzing statistical data in the broader context of geographic applications and research.  Keywords: statistics, methods, analysis, research

 

GEOG 331

Geographies of Poverty, Care & Responsibility (5)

Vicky Lawson

TTh, 9:30-11:20

This new course explores causes and patterns of global poverty and links this with the urgent need for care and care ethics in our lives and in society broadly.  The course connects academic inquiry on the interconnections between global poverty with the theory and practice of care ethics and caring practices through a research project or through service-learning in the community.  We will examine how care work is being intensified and simultaneously devalued, we will explore the ways in which care is a public rather than a private matter and we will think about our responsibilities to care for those who are near and those who are across the globe.  Students will learn about the possibilities and challenges of caring across distance (geographical and social) and about how to respectfully engage with people in different places.  Finally, we will explore current efforts to construct alternative ways of caring for our society and our world.  Learning Goals: i) understand geographical patterns and causes of global poverty; ii) learn about geographies of care in a global context; iii) conduct either a research project or service-learning/action research to think through concepts of collective responsibility to society. Keywords: Global poverty, care, care ethics, responsibility.

 

 

GEOG 335 (5)

THE DEVELOPING WORLD

Joe Hannah

MW, 2:30-4:20

Characteristics and causes, external and internal, of Third World development and obstacles to that development, with a critical development focus. Special attention to social processes, disasters and disaster recovery, NGO’s, resource development, and geopolitics, drawing on specific case studies from the Middle East, Africa,  and Latin America and the Caribbean.

 

GEOG 425 (5 credits)

Qualitative Methods in Geography

Joe Hannah

TTh, 11:30-1:20

The purpose of this course is:  1) to expand and deepen your knowledge about qualitative research methodology and method; 2) to practice the use of qualitative research techniques such as participant observation, textual and discourse analysis and interviewing; 3) to examine current issues in qualitative methodology such as research ethics and research politics.  The learning objectives of this course are threefold.  First, we learn how social theory and philosophy continually and reciprocally shape methodology as well as research design and strategies.  I will emphasize the contributions of feminist theory to qualitative methodology.   Second, we study and practice various techniques such as interviewing, participant observation and life history collection that include writing field notes and interview transcription. And finally, we examine modes of analysis such as textual interpretation, discourse analysis and ethnography and engage and interrogate the process of writing up and representing the results of our research. We also grapple with the issues of ethics, representation and authority as part of the research process. Keywords:

 

 

 

GEOG 445 (5)   “W” course

The Geography of Housing

Suzanne Withers

MW, 12:30-2:20

Focuses on the geography of housing, especially in the United States. Topics include: the American dream of home ownership; housing affordability and differential access to home ownership; homelessness; public housing; housing demography; residential mobility and neighborhood change, and discrimination in the housing market. Special attention is given to the recent boom and bust of the housing market. Keywords: homelessness, home ownership, discrimination, suburbanization, gated communities, race, United States

Geog 451 (5) “W” course

Cultural Landscapes of Latin America

 

Ron Smith

MWF  2:30-4:20

Examines cultural geographies of the Américas. Course themes will include development and environmental exploitation, Globalization, colonialism and rebellion, immigration, war, indigeneity, and solidarity. These ideas will be examined through a cultural lens, examining new media, film, popular art and literature to illustrate cultural phenomena, and their appropriation in the global north. special emphasis on in-class participation, and students will write response papers in addition to a larger, end of the quarter essay.

 

GEOG 461 (5 credits)

Urban Geographic Information Systems

Sarah Elwood

T Th 9:30-11:20 am; labs TTh or MW

Introduces concepts and application skills for GIS-based analysis of urban/regional issues. Includes data sources/acquisition, preparation/coding, analysis, representation, and communication. Prerequisite: 2.0 in GEOG 360; recommended: GEOG 277. Keywords: the city, GIS, spatial analysis, spatial data, urban planning and policy, access, social justice

 

GEOG 471 (5)   “W” course

Methods of Resource Analysis

Craig ZumBrunnen

MW, 2:30-4:20

Focuses primarily on optimization techniques, especially linear, integer and mixed integer programming using LINGO™ on Window PCs (or LINDO™ software on Windows PCs, or MAC PCs). Explores some mixed-attribute, multiple- attribute, and multiple-objective, techniques.  Assumes that the student has studied neither the calculus nor matrix algebra.   Rather than presenting purely a “cook book” or “canned” approach, students will be exposed to both the theory and mathematics behind the methods prior to using the various computer programs available on both mainframes and micros.  The goal of the course is to impart a good operational knowledge of various analytical tools that can be applied to resource management as well as other geographic problems. In addition to geographic research in general, this class should prove valuable to the individual interested in  professional world with a public or private employer dealing with resource management/ development  issues. As much theory as possible will precede method so that the student gains an appreciation of the appropriate context in which to apply a given technique. Students are expected to attend all classes, do the  assigned reading, and complete all assigned exercises and exams on time. Keywords: systems analysis, optimization, resource analysis, sustainability, ecological economic analysis.

GRADING: Graded exercises 100%.

REFERENCE Text: Linus Schrage’s (L), Optimization Modeling with LINGO 5th edition.

Chicago: LINDO Systems Inc., 2003.  [DON’T PURCHASE as it is downloadable for free!!]

SOFTWARE: free download ofLINGO Version 11.0:

http://www.lindo.com/index.php?option=com_

content&view=article&id=2&Itemid=10

GEOG 474 (5)

GEOGRAPHY AND THE LAW

Brandon Derman

TTh, 11:30-1:20

Explores the intersections of law, geography, and society. Topics include social and environmental justice, political power and activism, and the construction of legal norms in the international context.  The course is structured as a seminar, emphasizing discussion and written work engaged with a set of key readings.  Keywords: social justice, environmental justice, law, political geography, power, activism, the transnational