PassagesOur Friends, Remembered

Below we pay tribute to recently deceased alumni, faculty, students and friends. Because we are not always aware of deaths in the larger UW Medicine community, we gratefully accept your notifications. Our sincere condolences to those who have lost loved ones.

Alumni | Faculty and Former Faculty | Friends

Alumni

Lawrence Yates, M.S., Ph.D., Fel. (physiology and biophysics)

Born Dec. 11, 1951, in Dallas, Texas
Died July 15, 2016

Dr. Lawrence Yates received a Ph.D. in meat and animal science from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. After a fellowship at the UW School of Medicine, he became an assistant professor at Oklahoma State University. Dr. Yates held senior leadership positions at the Nebraska Beef Council and Red Oak Farms, Inc. He also worked for the U.S. Department of Agriculture in the Agriculture Marketing Service (AMS). He received several awards, such as the AMS Distinguished Service Award and the American Meat Science Association Special Recognition Award. Known for his work with Table Grace Ministries, Dr. Yates was passionate about helping those less fortunate than himself. He is survived by his wife, Bernice, and other family members and friends.

Jose G. Albernaz, M.D., Res. ’47

Born Januaria, Brazil
Died Oct. 2015

Dr. Jose Albernaz was born in Brazil, where he earned a medical degree at the age of 22. After completing surgical training in the U.S., including a residency in neurosurgery in Chicago, Ill., he returned to Brazil as the first American-trained neurosurgeon. Dr. Albernaz co-founded the Brazilian Society of Neurosurgery, served as chairman at the Federal University of Minas Gerais, president of the State Medical Board and vice president of the World Congress of Neurosurgery. He had more than 40 scientific articles published in journals throughout the world. In 1968, Dr. Albernaz returned to the U.S. with his family and joined the faculty of the Medical College of Ohio. A devoted teacher, Dr. Albernaz was especially proud to have twice been awarded the Golden Apple by his medical students. Dr. Albernaz spent many years in private practice in Marion, Ohio, until he retired. Dr. Albernaz is survived by his wife, Doris, and other family members and friends.

Gilbert G. Eade, M.D. ’51

Born April 8, 1926, in Snoqualmie Falls, Wash.
Died May 21, 2016, in Beaverton, Ore.

Dr. Gilbert Eade, a UW Medicine emeritus faculty member, was a pioneer in the practice of plastic and reconstructive surgery in the Pacific Northwest. After graduating from the UW School of Medicine, he completed training in general surgery and then a residency in plastic and reconstructive surgery at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, Texas. Dr. Eade spent a significant portion of his career at Swedish Medical Center in Seattle. He was a kind and thoughtful man who loved children, nature and life. Dr. Eade is survived by family members and friends.

 

John W. Arnold, M.D., Res. ’52 (internal medicine)

Born Feb. 6, 1928, in Brooklyn, N.Y.
Died May 25, 2016

Dr. John Arnold graduated summa cum laude from New York University before attending Yale School of Medicine. He then completed a medicine internship at Harborview Medical Center and two years of residency in internal medicine at UW Medicine. He also served two years as a lieutenant in the U.S Army. In 1956, he moved to Rochester, Minn., where he completed an internal medicine residency. Then he helped establish Consultants in Internal Medicine, where he practiced for 35 years until retirement. Dr. Arnold was active in the early days of the Cascade Wilderness Club and Bellingham Mountain Rescue. To aid victims of hypothermia, he devised a portable water-circulating “hydraulic sarong” that was manufactured and distributed worldwide, in addition to a precursor for the waist belt for backpacks. He was an active woodworker, a master gardener and a painter (watercolor). Dr. Arnold is survived by his wife, Joan, and other family members and friends.

Theodore Clinton West, Ph.D. ’52 (pharmacology)

Born May 7, 1919
Died Feb. 9, 2015

Dr. Theodore West received a Ph.D. in pharmacology from the University of Washington. He then joined the faculty at the University of California, Davis, where he played an important role in streamlining the medical-school curriculum. Dr. West retired in 1986, with approximately 70 publications to his name. An avid reader, Dr. West’s experiences as a hospital corpsman in World War II are included in War and Sacrifice, a 2010 collection of survivors’ stories.

James C. Caillouette, M.D. ’54

Born June 2, 1927, in Los Angeles, Calif.
Died Dec. 25, 2015, in Pasadena, Calif.

Dr. James Caillouette served as an air crewman for two years in the U.S. Navy before receiving a medical degree from the UW School of Medicine, graduating with honors. He went on to practice obstetrics and gynecology in Pasadena, serving as the president of the Pacific Coast Obstetrical and Gynecological Society. Dr. Caillouette was also an avid inventor and researcher: he secured 33 patents for medical products and devices and published 35 scientific papers throughout his career. Known for his community service, he loved jazz and playing the drums. Dr. Caillouette is survived by his wife, Joan, and other family members and friends.

Clarence E. Rozgay, M.D., Res. ’54 (pediatrics)

Born March 10, 1926, in Omaha, Neb.
Died May 25, 2016, in Medina, Wash.

Dr. Clarence Rozgay served as a medical officer in the U.S. Navy during World War II and the Korean War. After his service, he practiced pediatrics in the Seattle area for almost 40 years, and he helped establish the King County Poison Control Center.

Shirley Cooke Anderson, M.D. ’55, Res. ’58 (pediatrics), MPH

Born March 21, 1928, in Chicago, Ill.
Died June 15, 2016

Dr. Shirley Cooke Anderson, a UW Medicine emeritus faculty member, attended the University of Washington and then the UW School of Medicine, where she was one of four female graduates in her class. She completed an internship at the Los Angeles General Hospital and a residency at Seattle Children’s before returning to the University of Washington to earn a master’s degree in public health. Dr. Anderson began her private practice at the Seahurst Medical Clinic in Burien, Wash., and, in 1974, she became the first medical director of the Center for Sexual Assault at Harborview Medical Center, one of the first hospital-based programs for sexual assault in the country. Dr. Anderson also served on the FBI’s first task force to develop protocols for the collection of evidence in sexual assault cases. Over the course of her career, Dr. Anderson traveled extensively, educating, lecturing, consulting and promoting the establishment of new centers to care for victims of sexual assault. Dr. Anderson is survived by family and friends.

Leo M. Karpeles, M.D. ’55

Born 1920, in Washington, D.C.
Died in Crownsville, Md.

Dr. Leo Karpeles received a medical degree from the UW School of Medicine. His research in cardiovascular physiology led to a teaching position in the Department of Physiology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. After retiring from the university as an associate professor, he did a residency in family medicine and opened a medical practice in Blue Ridge Summit, Pa. Dr. Karpeles was known for his devotion to his patients, often travelling throughout the area to make house calls. He enjoyed reading aloud to elementary school students and taking his dogs to visit residents in nursing homes. He is survived by his wife, Nancy, and other family members and friends.

Walter C. Petersen, M.D. ’55

Born Oct. 3, 1928, in Dallas, Texas
Died April 4, 2016, in Seattle, Wash.

Dr. Walter Petersen served in the U.S. Army, graduated from the University of Washington, then earned a medical degree from the UW School of Medicine. After an internship in Brooklyn, N.Y., and a residency in ophthalmology at the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute, he returned to Seattle, where he practiced ophthalmology for 48 years. Dr. Petersen served as president of the Washington Academy of Eye Physicians and Surgeons and of the American Eye Study Club. He also served as chairman of the Department of Ophthalmology at Swedish Medical Center for six years and as chairman of the Bishop Foundation for several years. The American Academy of Ophthalmology gave him an Honor Award for 15 years of service in education. Dr. Petersen is survived by his wife, Sheila, and other family members and friends.

Joseph Snyder, M.D. ’55

Born March 14, 1930, in Delnice, Croatia
Died June 7, 2016, in Denver, Colo.

Dr. Joseph Snyder received a medical degree from the UW School of Medicine. Following an internship at the University of Minnesota Hospital, he joined the U.S. Air Force, serving as captain and assistant chief of medicine. After he left the service, he cofounded the Denver Cardiology Group, where he saw patients for 33 years. At Presbyterian St. Luke’s Hospital, he was director of the cardiovascular laboratory and served as the chief of cardiology for 20 years. Dr. Snyder was also active in the Colorado Heart Association, receiving the Gold Heart Award in 1982. A lover of the outdoors, he enjoyed hiking, skiing and golfing. Dr. Snyder is survived by his wife, Ann, and other family members and friends.

Robert V. Erickson, M.D. ’56, Res. ’62 (internal medicine)

Born July 15, 1930, in Seattle, Wash.
Died March 25, 2016, in Seattle, Wash.

Dr. Robert Erickson graduated first in his class from the UW School of Medicine, earning the Aaron Brown Scholastic Award. He continued his education at Columbia-Presbyterian Hospital and then joined the U.S. Army Medical Research Laboratory in Fort Knox, Ky. Dr. Erickson found his way back to Seattle, serving as the chief resident at UW Medical Center before starting a private internal medicine practice. Specializing in geriatrics, Dr. Erickson served as the medical director for several senior care and retirement facilities and was also an associate faculty member of the UW School of Pharmacy. Known for his sense of humor and bright smile, he enjoyed fishing, gardening and crabbing. He is survived by his wife, Lynne, and family and friends.

Vernon O. Larson, M.D. ’56

Born in 1927, in Rathdrum, Idaho
Died June 6, 2016

Dr. Vernon Larson served in the Merchant Marines in World War II. After his service, he attended Washington State College; he put himself through school by logging in northern Idaho. Dr. Larson received a medical degree from the UW School of Medicine and completed an internship with the U.S. Public Health Service Hospital in New Orleans, followed by service time in Norfolk, Va. Further training in diagnostic and therapeutic radiology followed on the East Coast. Dr. Larson then returned to the Pacific Northwest, where he practiced diagnostic and therapeutic radiology for 31 years and helped form Gross, Larson, Whitney and Associates, which later became Diagnostic Imaging Northwest. He served as chief of staff at Allenmore Hospital and was a board member at Lakewood General Hospital as well as Mary Bridge Children’s Hospital. Dr. Larson was a member of the Pierce County Medical Society, the Washington State Radiological Society and the Pacific Northwest Radiologic Society, and he was a fellow in the American College of Radiology. He was also an avid tennis enthusiast with national rankings in doubles and singles. Dr. Larson is survived by his wife of 67 years, Kit, and other family members and friends.

Duncan T. (Ted) Baer, M.D. ’57

Born March 13, 1931
Died July 4, 2016

Dr. Duncan (Ted) Baer enrolled at the University of Washington and joined the Reserve Officer’s Training Corps. He then earned a medical degree at the UW School of Medicine. Dr. Baer’s military and medical career took him and his family all over the country; each of his five children was born in a different city. After a medical residency in Arlington, Va., Dr. Baer and his family moved to Nellis Air Force Base, where he served as a flight surgeon for the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds for three years. He completed a residency in ophthalmology in San Leandro, Calif., then moved to Tacoma, Wash., where he began a private practice as one of the first ophthalmologists in the city. He also earned a private pilot’s license and maintained his credentials as a flight surgeon. Dr. Baer was one of the founding doctors at Allenmore Medical Center, and he served as president of the Pierce County Medical Society. He was a member of the Saint Charles Borromeo Parish, the Fircrest Planning Commission, the Ski Patrol at White Pass and the Fircrest Golf Club. Dr. Baer spent many days fishing, hunting, and skiing in the Olympic Mountains. He is survived by his wife of 61 years, Maryln, and other family members and friends.

Anna Henderson Chavelle, M.D. ’57

Born Jan. 28, 1933, in Seattle, Wash.
Died Sept. 15, 2016

Dr. Anna Chavelle, a UW Medicine emeritus faculty member, received a medical degree from the UW School of Medicine, where she was one of only three women in her class. She opened her own family medicine practice in 1960 and held leadership positions in a number of organizations throughout her career, such as the Washington Academy of Family Physicians, the Washington State Medical Association, First Choice Health and Northwest Hospital & Medical Center. A UW associate professor of family medicine and a member of the School’s admissions committee, Dr. Chavelle served as the president of the UW School of Medicine Alumni Association and received the Alumni Service Award. She also enjoyed serving on the scholarship selection committee for the Pride Foundation in Seattle. Dr. Chavelle is survived by her wife, Christine Knutson, and other family members and friends.

Donald F. Steiner, M.S., M.D., Res. ’57 (family medicine), Int. ’57, Res. ’60 (internal medicine)

Born July 15, 1930, in Lima, Ohio
Died Nov. 11, 2014, in Chicago, Ill.

Dr. Donald Steiner earned a master’s degree in biochemistry and a medical degree from the University of Chicago. His research on insulin and other hormones, conducted while working as an assistant professor of biochemistry at the University of Chicago, led to a landmark discovery; he showed that insulin started out not as two amino acid chains, but as one long chain, which was later broken into two. Details from Dr. Steiner’s work helped manufacturers produce highly purified cow and pig insulin, which was more tolerable to patients. His findings led to better ways of monitoring insulin production in patients and assessing the body’s sensitivity to the hormone. Dr. Steiner wrote hundreds of articles in scientific journals, which, according to the University of Chicago, were cited more than 10,000 times. He also received many national and international scientific awards. Dr. Steiner’s other passion was the arts — the Chicago Symphony, the opera and the theatre; he was an accomplished pianist. Read more at nytimes.com. Photo: Joe Stafford/University of Chicago Medicine

John Timothy Chapman, M.D., Res. ’58 (pediatrics)

Born July 22, 1928, in Seattle, Wash.
Died July 31, 2016, in Tacoma, Wash.

Dr. John Chapman served in the U.S. Army as an X-ray technician before receiving a medical degree from George Washington University. After completing two fellowships in adult and pediatric neurology, he became the first pediatric neurologist in the Pacific Northwest in 1960. Throughout his career, Dr. Chapman practiced at both Seattle Children’s and Northwest Hospital & Medical Center. He enjoyed being outdoors and going mountain climbing, and he was a voracious reader. Dr. Chapman is survived by his wife, Patti, and other family members and friends.

James T. Dodge, Sr., B.S. ’58 (medical technology), M.D. ’61, Res. ’67 (internal medicine)

Born Oct. 14, 1936, in Seattle, Wash.
Died Jan. 31, 2016, in Yakima, Wash.

Dr. James Dodge attended the University of Washington and then the UW School of Medicine. During medical school, he took a year off to research red blood cells, and he published a manuscript that was recognized as among the 200 most-cited medical research papers published from 1945 to 1988. Dr. Dodge completed an internship and residency at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, followed by a research fellowship at Columbia University. He then returned to the UW School of Medicine for a final year of medical residency before beginning a practice in internal medicine in Yakima, Wash., where he would spend the rest of his career. Dr. Dodge established the nuclear medicine laboratory at Providence Yakima Medical Center and co-founded Internal Medicine Associates of Yakima Inc. At the age of 60, Dr. Dodge decided to work full-time in the nuclear medicine department at Memorial Hospital. Dr. Dodge’s life-long passion was downhill skiing, and he served a total of 64 years with the National Ski Patrol volunteer service; he also greatly enjoyed music. Dr. Dodge is survived by family members and friends.

Melvin B. Meyer, M.D. ’58

Born Sept. 29, 1931, in Moxee, Wash.
Died Jan. 8, 2015, in Brattleboro, Vt.

Dr. Melvin Meyer received a medical degree from the UW School of Medicine, and after his residencies in internal medicine and clinical pharmacology at Grady Memorial Hospital, he joined the U.S. Navy for three years. Following his service, he conducted medical research for Astra Pharmaceuticals. Dr. Meyer and his wife, Betty, served as foreign missionaries, travelling to rural communities in Nepal and the Commonwealth of Dominica. During this time, he oversaw the opening of a hospital that had been destroyed by a hurricane and cared for patients in leprosy and tuberculosis clinics. When Dr. Meyer and his family returned to the United States, he managed a private medical practice in New Hampshire for several years before joining Harvard Vanguard Associates. Dr. Meyer enjoyed fishing, spending time with his grandchildren and travelling to far-off places. He is survived by family and friends.

Robert Burry Pelzel, M.D., Fel. ’58 (cardiology)

Born June 22, 1924
Died July 15, 2016, in Charleston, W. Va.

Dr. Robert Pelzel served in the U.S. Navy for three years as a cryptographer before receiving a medical degree from Harvard University. After his fellowship at the UW School of Medicine, he took a position at Group Health Cooperative. He went on to join the management team and served as vice president until his retirement in 1986. Dr. Pelzel loved listening to chamber music, playing the cello and fishing. He is survived by his wife, Jane, and other family members and friends.

Donald C. Whitenack, M.D. ’58

Born April 5, 1932, in Yakima, Wash.
Died Oct. 31, 2014

Daniel Taylor Hayden, M.D. ’59, Ph.D.

Born Oct. 2, 1918, in Great Falls, Mont.
Died Feb. 4, 2015, in Silverdale, Wash.

Dr. Daniel Hayden graduated from the University of Washington with a bachelor’s degree in chemistry. During World War II, he worked for a chemical plant in Tacoma, Wash., and his contributions were considered vital to the war effort. After the war, Dr. Hayden moved to Peru, where he managed a chemical plant for Grace Lines Shipping Company and assisted with missionary work. When he returned to the United States, he received a medical degree from the UW School of Medicine and a Ph.D. in chemistry. Dr. Hayden practiced family medicine for several years before joining Group Health Cooperative, where he served as medical director until retirement. Known for his service to several Christian organizations, Dr. Hayden was a member of the Christian Medical Society and served as an elder at the Des Moines Gospel Chapel.

Dale Brandt, M.D. ’60

Died Feb. 15, 2016, in Milwaukie, Ore.

Dr. Dale Brandt received a medical degree from the UW School of Medicine, and then went on to complete a residency at Santa Clara Hospital in San Jose, Calif. After serving as a flight surgeon in the U.S. Army for three years, Dr. Brandt moved to Pendleton, Ore., where he practiced internal medicine for 41 years. Dr. Brandt is survived by his wife, Barbara, and other family members and friends.

James H. Mahnke, M.D. ’60, Res. ’66

Born March 26, 1933, in Wenatchee, Wash.
Died Aug. 2, 2016

Dr. James Mahnke received a medical degree from the UW School of Medicine. Specializing in neurosurgery, he went on to teach at the Medical College of Virginia, the Yale University School of Medicine and the University of California, Irvine. While at UC Irvine, he was the recipient of the Golden Apple Award, presented by students for his excellence in teaching, and he served as the dean of students. Dr. Mahnke also spent time in private practice in Colorado and Montana. Known for his warm and compassionate bedside manner, Dr. Mahnke served on numerous church and hospital boards. He is survived by his wife, Diane, and other family members and friends.

Noel L. Morlock, M.D. ’60

Born Oct. 29, 1935
Died May 22, 2016, in Anacortes, Wash.

Dr. Noel Morlock received a medical degree from the UW School of Medicine. He dedicated much of his career to research in neurophysiology. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth, and family and friends.

Solbritt E. Murphy, M.D. ’60, Res. ’65

Born June 20, 1933, in Jonkoping, Sweden
Died May 29, 2015

Dr. Solbritt Elisabet Murphy studied medicine and pediatrics at the UW School of Medicine as an exchange student from Sweden. Following a residency in pediatrics in 1965, she moved to Littleton, Colo., to work at Tri-County Health, and later she served as the associate director of the Tri-County District Health Department. Dr. Murphy’s career took her around the nation and the world. She directed the Bureau of Maternal and Child Health and the Division of Family Health in New York, then the Austin-Travis County Health Department, in Austin, Texas, followed by work in international aid on behalf of abandoned children in Romania. Dr. Murphy worked across the country as a temporary pediatrician wherever she was needed. When her health restricted her travel, she assisted the Arapahoe County Court, working with crisis and counseling phone lines. She was also a volunteer at the Littleton Museum and continued to counsel until her last years. Dr. Murphy is survived by family members and friends.

Sigurd J. Normann, M.D. ’60, Ph.D. ’66 (pathology)

Born Oct. 24, 1935, in Cincinnati, Ohio
Died April 4, 2016

Dr. Sigurd Normann received a medical degree and a Ph.D. from the UW School of Medicine. After serving as the captain of the Walter Reed Army Research and Development Command in Maryland for two years, he joined the faculty at the University of Florida, retiring as an emeritus professor in 2010. Dr. Normann was the recipient of several awards for excellence in teaching, such as the College of Medicine Teacher of the Year Award and the Distinguished Teacher Award. Dr. Normann also had a prolific research career, publishing 86 peer-reviewed papers, three books and 14 chapters. In addition to serving as the president of the Society for Leukocyte Biology, he was the chief of cardiovascular pathology at the Veteran’s Administration Hospital and the University of Florida Health Shands Hospital. Known for his inspirational service to the American Cancer Society, Dr. Normann enjoyed hiking and skiing. He is survived by his wife, LeJene, and other family members and friends.

Paul Sherman Paulson, M.D., Res. ’60 (internal medicine), Fel. ’64 (radiology)

Born Oct. 21, 1928, Turtle Lake, N.D.
Died June 12, 2016, Green Valley, Ariz.

Dr. Paul Paulson received a medical degree from the University of Minnesota. After serving as a captain in the U.S. Army at Fort Lewis, Wash., he moved to Seattle to do a residency in internal medicine and a fellowship in radiology. Dr. Paulson was the chief of radiology at Providence Hospital in Seattle for 25 years. He also served as chief of staff. Dr. Paulson loved spending time outdoors. He is survived by his wife, Denise, and other family members and friends.

Ralph F. Kamm, M.D. ’61

Born 1931 in Illinois
Died March 26, 2016, in Wailea, Maui, Hawaii

Dr. Ralph Kamm graduated with a bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of Washington. He served as class president during his time at the UW School of Medicine, later completing an internship at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. During his residency at the University of Oregon Medical Center in Portland, Ore., he authored two research papers that were published in the Journal of Neurosurgery. Dr. Kamm spent a significant portion of his career in private practice with Northwest Neurological Surgery and many years as chief of neurosurgery at Seattle Children’s. He also served as president of the Western Neurosurgical Society and the Washington Association of Neurosurgeons — as well as president of the UW School of Medicine Alumni Association in 1976. Beyond his love for his family and patients, Dr. Kamm was an ardent sailor, skier, golfer and fly fisherman — and an accomplished musician, who played timpani in the Seattle Symphony for four years. He is survived by his wife, Ann, and by other family members and friends.

John N. Lavallee, M.D., Res. ’61 (psychiatry and behavioral sciences)

Born Dec. 24, 1925, in Morinville, Alberta, Canada
Died July 5, 2016, in Cannon Beach, Ore.

Dr. John Lavallee studied pediatrics and psychiatry, practicing medicine in Seattle for 39 years and completing various assignments for the Medical Doctors Association. He also served in the Canadian Armed Forces during World War II. Dr. Lavallee is survived by his wife, Theresa, and other family members and friends.

Donald G. Kestle, M.D., Res. ’64 (internal medicine)

Born Aug. 22, 1936, in Seattle, Wash.
Died Aug. 21, 2014

Dr. Donald Kestle received a medical degree from Washington University and went on to research tuberculosis for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, Ga. After a residency at the University of California in San Francisco, Dr. Kestle began a fellowship studying infectious diseases at UW Medical Center. He then joined Overlake Internal Medicine Associates in Bellevue, Wash., where he practiced for 30 years. Dr. Kestle enjoyed traveling, gardening and spending time with his family. He is survived by his wife, Mary Ann, and other family members and friends.

Jack D. Bartroff, B.S. ’65 (medical technology), DDS

Born Aug. 18, 1941, in Cashmere, Wash.
Died May 30, 2016

Dr. Jack D. Bartroff attended undergraduate and dental school at the University of Washington. From 1967–1971, he served in the U.S. Navy as a dental officer stationed in Japan. After returning to the U.S., Dr. Bartroff completed orthodontic training at UCLA. Then he began private practice in San Diego, Calif., maintaining orthodontic practices in Mira Mesa and Rancho Bernardo before retiring in 1995. He and his wife then moved to Coronado, Calif., and were active in the Graham Memorial Presbyterian Church. In 2006, he was awarded the Coronado Honorary Citizen Award for coming to the rescue of a neighbor who was being attacked by an intruder. Dr. Bartroff played amateur USTA tennis competitively into his 60s and volunteered as a wheelchair tennis coach in Point Loma and Rancho Bernardo. He is survived by his wife, Barbara, and other family members and friends.

Bernard Owen Rand, M.D., Res. ’65 (neurological surgery)

Died Sept. 11, 2014

Dr. Bernard Rand was a resident in neurosurgery at the UW School of Medicine, and he spent much of his career in private practice. He served as a lieutenant colonel in the U.S Army and was also a professor of neurosurgery at the University of Kentucky. Throughout his life, he enjoyed fishing, golfing and reading. Dr. Rand is survived by his wife, Martha, and other family members and friends.

Lawrence K. Schneider, Ph.D. ’66 (biological structure)

Died July 3, 2014

Dr. Lawrence Schneider passed away after a two-year battle with cancer. He is survived by his wife, Catherine, and family and friends.

Munn W. Chin, M.D. ’67

Born in Seattle, Wash.
Died Jan. 10, 2016, in San Diego, Calif.

Dr. Munn Chin graduated with a bachelor of science from Stanford University and then earned a medical degree from the UW School of Medicine. Specializing in radiology, he spent most of his career practicing medicine in San Diego. He is survived by his wife, Edean, and other family and friends.

Elizabeth A. Clifton, M.D. ’67

Born Sept. 3, 1946
Died June 29, 2016

Dr. Elizabeth Clifton graduated from the University of Washington with a degree in classical Greek. After she earned a medical degree from the UW School of Medicine, she maintained a thriving practice in downtown Seattle for several years. Dr. Clifton loved gardening and collecting rare books and stamps, and she was known for her artistic talents.

Maurice E. Gillespie, M.D., Res. ’67 (anesthesiology)

Born May 2, 1941, in Somerville, Mass.
Died June 23, 2016, in Monterey, Calif.

Dr. Maurice Gillespie received a medical degree from Tufts University. After an internship at Harborview Medical Center, he served as a battalion surgeon in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War. In 1968, he was awarded the Bronze Star for valor and the Vietnam Cross of Gallantry. While volunteering at Memorial Children’s Hospital in Dong Ha, Vietnam, Dr. Gillespie decided to pursue a career in pediatrics. Eventually, he settled in Fresno, Calif., where he practiced pediatric medicine for the next 40 years. In that time, he served as chief of the medical staff for Valley Children’s Hospital and also worked with California Children’s Services of Fresno County. Dr. Gillespie was actively involved with several community organizations, such as the Monterey Bay Aquarium, the San Carlos Cathedral and the Knights of Columbus. He is survived by his wife, Patricia, and other family members and friends.

William M. Kamell, M.D., Res. ’67

Died Oct. 16, 2008

Dr. William Kamell received a medical degree from Cornell University. He then joined the U.S. Air Force, serving as a flight surgeon during the Vietnam War. He completed his residency in orthopaedics at Strong Memorial Hospital and later established Canandaigua Orthopedic Associates and Finger Lakes IME Associates in New York. Dr. Kamell was an active member of the Canandaigua Baptist Church.

Philip Earl Young, M.D., Res. ’68 (general surgery)

Born 1940, in Los Angeles, Calif.
Died Feb. 4, 2015

Dr. Philip Young received a medical degree from Harvard University. After his residencies at the UW School of Medicine and Boston Hospital for Women, he served two years in the U.S. Navy. Following his service, he joined the medical school faculty at the University of California, San Diego, remaining passionate about teaching throughout his career. Dr. Young was a founding member and CEO of IGO Medical Group, one of the first private practice in vitro fertilization labs in the country. IGO’s research led to the first “test-tube” pregnancy in San Diego. Dr. Young loved travelling and held a deep appreciation for animals and the environment. He is survived by his wife and other family members and friends.

Wen Tsuo Chiang, M.S. ’69, M.D.

George Christian Harris, M.D., Res. ’69 (psychiatry)

Born March 29, 1939, in Seattle, Wash.
Died Aug. 24, 2014

Dr. George Harris received a medical degree from St. Louis University. After his internship at Virginia Mason Hospital, he joined the U.S. Army, serving as a surgeon at Fort Wainwright in Fairbanks, Alaska. Following his service, he completed a residency at the UW School of Medicine and the VA. In 1969, he began a private psychiatry practice, specializing in forensic psychiatry. Consulting on a number of high-profile criminal prosecutions throughout his career, Dr. Harris was a diplomate of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology and a founding member of the Seattle Forensic Institute. Known for his musical talents, he played violin and piano in various string quartets and chamber music ensembles. Dr. Harris is survived by his wife, Renae, and other family members and friends.

Allen Boeker, M.D., Res. ’70 (radiology)

Born Jan. 9, 1938, in Jackson, Wis.
Died June 11, 2016, in Issaquah, Wash.

Dr. Allen Boeker worked his way through undergraduate school and medical school at the University of Wisconsin. After serving two years in the U.S. Army, Dr. Boeker completed a residency in radiology at UW Medicine. He remained in Seattle, Wash., practicing medicine for the rest of his career. He loved family, biking, listening to NPR, watching PBS, reading newspapers and magazine and gardening. Dr. Boeker is survived by his wife, Susan, and other family members and friends.

C. Neil Herrick, M.D., Fel. ’70 (obstetrics and gynecology)

Born Jan. 29, 1932, in Ogden, Utah
Died May 21, 2015, in Signal Mountain, Tenn.

Dr. Neil Herrick served for 32 years in the U.S. Army, retiring as a colonel. A member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Dr. Herrick is survived by his wife, Catherine, and other family members and friends.

Richard G. Black, M.D., Res. ’71 (anesthesiology)

Born Aug. 16, 1928, in Walkerville, Ontario, Canada
Died Aug. 30, 2014, in Sugar Land, Texas.

Dr. Richard Black earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the University of Toronto. His interest shifted from machines to humans when he enrolled in the medical school at the University of Toronto, followed by residencies in neurological surgery in Toronto and Vancouver. In 1964, he earned an academic position at UW Medicine, and, a few years later, was recruited for a position at the Pain Clinic. While at UW Medicine, he also completed a residency in anesthesiology. Dr. Black wrote several books and made many innovations in the field of anesthesiology and chronic pain. He left UW Medicine to become co-director of the Pain Treatment Center at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Md., where he also served as chief of regional anesthesiology and pain services in the Department of Anesthesiology. He was then recruited by the University of Texas Medical Center to establish a chronic pain clinic. Until his retirement, Dr. Black helped to relieve the suffering of cancer patients at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Dr. Black is survived by his wife, Mary Ann, and other family members and friends.

James E. Heavner, DVM, M.D., Ph.D., Res. ’71 (anesthesiology)

Died May 18, 2016

Dr. James Heavner was the founding director of the anesthesiology research program at Texas Tech Health Science Center. He traveled globally to consult, teach and lecture on the management of pain and the pharmacology of local anesthetics. He was active in many professional organizations, served on the editorial board of several professional journals, published research articles, contributed to textbooks and helped develop and coordinate an international examination for the credentialing of pain specialists. Dr. Heavner obtained a veterinary medicine degree at the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine and then a doctorate in pharmacology. He held research faculty positions at universities around the world, including the University of Washington, Virginia Tech University, the University of Edinburgh in Scotland and Helsinki Central University in Finland. He also spent several years as branch chief at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in Washington, D.C. Dr. Heavner loved the outdoors and his family; he is survived by his wife, Rev. Betsey Heavner, and other family members and friends.

Gary Schumaker, PA-C (Seattle Class 3)

Born Sept. 7, 1932, in Huron, S.D.
Died May 3, 2016

Mr. Gary Morton Schumaker served many years in the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Marines, including two seven-month tours on the USS Midway and working as a field med tech in Vietnam, where he earned the Bronze Star, the Purple Heart and the Navy Achievement Medal. After retiring from the military, Mr. Schumaker attended school at MEDEX Northwest and became the first licensed PA in the state of Idaho. Mr. Schumaker was beloved by his patients and worked hard to create legislation that guided rules and regulations for PAs in Idaho. The Idaho Academy of Physician Assistants celebrated his accomplishments in 2013 with a Lifetime Achievement Award. Mr. Schumaker is survived by his wife, Donna, and other family members and friends.

Donald E. Simmons, M.D. ’71

Born June 18, 1945, in Wenatchee, Wash.
Died Nov. 22, 2014, in Yucaipa, Calif.

Dr. Donald Simmons received a medical degree from the UW School of Medicine and, after a residency at San Bernardino County Hospital, he served as an officer in the U.S. Air Force. Dr. Simmons spent most of his career practicing medicine in Southern California, serving as chief of staff at Redlands Community Hospital for two years. A fellow of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, he was an active participant in several local and national medical associations. Dr. Simmons is survived by his wife, Barbara, and other family members and friends.

James B. Gaviser, M.D., Res. ’72

Died Feb. 9, 2016

Dr. James Gaviser received a medical degree from the University of Minnesota. After residency at the UW School of Medicine, he completed further training at the Mayo Clinic and settled in Minneapolis, where he practiced medicine as a plastic surgeon. Known for his ability to make connections among people, Dr. Gaviser helped launch the Patient Partners program at Abbott Northwestern Hospital, which matched retired physicians and nurses with patients in need of support and advocacy. He also helped establish an exchange program between physicians and students in Minnesota and physicians and students in Israel. Dr. Gaviser enjoyed travelling, going to the theatre and playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Judy, and other family members and friends.

Lawrence Douglas Grouse, M.D. ’72, Res. ’73, Ph.D.

Born 1946, in Minneapolis, Minn.
Died June 10, 2016, in Seattle, Wash.

Dr. Lawrence Grouse received a medical degree from the UW School of Medicine and went on to become a clinical faculty member in the School’s Department of Neurology. In addition to practicing as a physician, Dr. Grouse was a gifted researcher and innovator in medical communications. In 2012, he became the associate editor-in-chief of the Journal of Thoracic Disease, where he not only started the International COPD Coalition column but also played a significant role in the journal’s development. He is survived by his wife, Jan, and other family members and friends.

Carl W. Hemby, PA-C (Seattle Class 4)

Born April 20, 1931, in Washington, N.C.
Died Nov. 21, 2015, in Yakima, Wash.

Mr. Carl Hemby served in the U.S. Air Force for 20 years. He was a member of Pilgrim Rest Missionary Baptist Church and also belonged to several organizations, such as the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Disabled American Vets and the International Footprint Association. Mr. Hemby is survived by his wife, Deborah, and other family members and friends.

James Robert Philp, M.D., Res. ’72 (internal medicine)

Born July 6, 1933, in Whittier, Calif.
Died March 23, 2016, in Bellevue, Wash.

Dr. James Philp received a medical degree from the University of California, San Francisco, and pursued a career in pathology, working at the Veteran’s Administration and teaching at the University of Oregon and the University of Colorado. He eventually accepted a position as an assistant pathologist at Fresno Community Hospital in California. In 1968, Dr. Philp began a residency at the UW School of Medicine and then went on to open a private dermatology practice in Bellevue, Wash., where he treated patients for more than 40 years. At one time, Dr. Philp was only the second person west of the Mississippi to be triple-board certified in anatomic pathology, clinical pathology and dermatology. Known for his love of cinema, Dr. Philp enjoyed building elaborate model railroad displays, reading Sherlock Holmes mysteries and collecting model cars. He is survived by his wife, Kathryn, and other family members and friends.

John H. TenPas, M.D. ’72

Born 1945, in Oregon
Died May 4, 2016, in Arlington, Mass.

Dr. John TenPas worked as a pharmacist prior to receiving a medical degree from the UW School of Medicine. After a residency at Massachusetts General Hospital and a fellowship in hematology with the National Institutes of Health, he took a position as an emergency room director at a Maryland hospital. Dr. TenPas went on to complete an ophthalmology residency at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, eventually launching a private ophthalmology practice. He finished his career at Lahey Clinic, retiring in 2011. An avid saltwater fly fisherman, he was awarded a world angling record from the International Game Fish Association in the Midway Islands. Dr. TenPas is survived by his wife, Mariclare, and other family members and friends.

Victor A. King, B.S. ’74 (microbiology), MBA

Born Nov. 28, 1946, in Snohomish, Wash.
Died May 19, 2016

Mr. Victor King received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Washington and an MBA from City University. He also served in the U.S Army.

Russell Nelson De Jong, Jr., M.D., Res. ’75 (obstetrics and gynecology)

Born 1945, in Ann Arbor, Mich.
Died Jan, 30, 2016, in Belgrade, Maine

Dr. Russell De Jong received a medical degree from the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. After interning at Los Angeles County Hospital, he did his residency at the UW School of Medicine, where he focused on helping underserved women gain access to healthcare. In 1981, he began teaching obstetrics and gynecology for the Maine-Dartmouth Family Practice Residency program. He also served as the medical director for the Family Planning Association of Maine and collaborated on many projects with the Maine Medical Association to improve safety and justice in healthcare. Dr. De Jong loved spending time outdoors and was an advocate for land conservation. He is survived by his partner, Janetha, and other family and friends.

John D. Fisk, M.D. ’75

Born March 24, 1948, in Flandreau, S.D.
Died Dec. 6, 2014

Dr. John Fisk received a medical degree from the UW School of Medicine and, after his residency, joined the U.S. Army, serving at Fitzsimons Army Medical Center in Colorado. Well-known for his contributions to pain management and spine imaging, Dr. Fisk travelled internationally to educate the medical community about his progressive practices. In addition to his expertise, his patients valued his gentle bedside manner and sense of humor. Dr. Fisk was an outdoor enthusiast, fond of hiking, camping, skiing and boating. He is survived by his wife, Kathleen.

Brian R. Hocum, M.D. ’75

Born June 18, 1949, in Spokane, Wash.
Died July 27, 2014

Dr. Brian Hocum received a medical degree from the UW School of Medicine. Following an internship at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, he began working in the emergency department at St. Joseph Regional Medical Center in Lewiston, Idaho, where he spent the remainder of his career. Known for his love of philosophical conversations and existential books, Dr. Hocum loved to cook, garden and spend time with his family.

Paul D. Johnson, M.D. ’75

Died Jan. 2, 2016

Dr. Johnson received a bachelor’s degree in biology from Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma, Wash., and a medical degree from the UW School of Medicine. In addition to family practice, Dr. Johnson was board certified in sports medicine, and he was among the first group of physicians in the nation to earn board certification in hospice and palliative care. After completing a family practice residency in San Bernardino, Calif., he began his career with Group Health Cooperative in Olympia, Wash., then returned to Skagit County to co-found North Cascade Family Physicians in Mt. Vernon. Dr. Johnson then retired from family practice and took a position as medical director for Hospice of the Northwest. He was a member of the board of trustees for the hospice, a member of the Skagit Valley Hospital Ethics Committee, a preceptor for the UW School of Nursing and MEDEX Northwest and a clinical instructor in family medicine at the UW School of Medicine. He also volunteered at a community clinic in Bolivia. Outside of his medical career, Dr. Johnson loved the outdoors and he had a great appreciation for music, especially the piano. He is survived by his wife, Kim Kusick, and other family members and friends.

David M. Jones, PA-C (Seattle Class 9)

Born Oct. 31, 1945, in Seattle, Wash.
Died Jan. 23, 2015, in Condon, Ore.

David Michael Jones earned bachelor’s degrees in history and zoology from the University of Washington, and he graduated from MEDEX Northwest. He served as a member of the U.S. Army Reserves from 1965–1971, worked as a PA at Pacific Lutheran University and served as a faculty member at MEDEX. When Mr. Jones and his family moved to Condon, Ore., he and another PA were the only medical providers in Gilliam County; in fact, they were the first PAs in the country to receive independent prescription-writing authority. He was named Rural PA of the Year by the American Association of Physician Assistants and received the award for Outstanding Contributions to Rural Health from the Oregon Rural Health Conference. When not caring for patients, Mr. Jones served as a volunteer firefighter and emergency medical technician. He is survived by his wife, Karen, and other family members and friends.

Fredy Edmundo Martinez, M.D., Res. ’76 (neurology)

Born Nov. 17, 1941, in Santa Ana, El Salvador
Died Jan. 1, 2015, in Pullman, Wash.

Dr. Fredy Martinez received a medical degree from the University of El Salvador, where he was awarded a prize for the best research thesis in a five-country region. The Pan-American Health Organization granted him a scholarship to study at the UW School of Medicine. Dr. Martinez eventually returned to the University of El Salvador as a professor of medicine until military conflict caused the university to close. Upon leaving El Salvador, Dr. Martinez settled in Pullman, Wash., where he worked as a physician at Washington State University Health and Wellness Services and taught neurophysiology through the WWAMI program. When he wasn’t caring for patients or teaching, Dr. Martinez enjoyed spending time with his family. He is survived by his wife, Mary, and other family members and friends.

Gilbert Dudley Fish III (formerly Dudley Paul Harrington), B.S. ’77 (microbiology), MHA

Born in Mt. Vernon, N.Y.
Died Aug. 25, 2014, in Baton Rouge, La.

Mr. Gilbert Fish served in the U.S. Air Force before receiving a degree in microbiology from the University of Washington. He went on to earn a master’s degree in health administration from Tulane University. Mr. Fish’s career spanned a variety of fields, including medical technology and clinical microbiology, before he retired in 2005. Known for his keen interest in World War II history, Mr. Fish was a charter member of the National World War II Museum in New Orleans. He is survived by his wife, Kathleen, and other family members and friends.

Michael Thomas Everitt, M.S. ’78 (biochemistry), Ph.D. ’80 (biochemistry), Fel. ’81 (clinical chemistry-laboratory medicine)

Born Dec. 3, 1949, in South Bend, Wash.
Died Feb. 23, 2016

Dr. Michael Everitt received a Ph.D. from the University of Washington and then began his career at the Wenatchee Valley Clinic. He went on to work at Helena Laboratories and served as a consulting director at Diagnostics, Inc. in Kent, Wash. An avid Huskies fan, Dr. Everitt was involved with several community organizations throughout his life, such as the Exchange Club, the Willapa Harbor Lions, the Raymond Elks Lodge and the University of Washington Alumni Association. He is survived by his wife, Lynn, and other family members and friends.

Russell Roundy, M.D., Res. ’78 (family medicine)

Born April 18, 1949, in La Grande, Ore.
Died Aug. 27, 2014

Dr. Russell Roundy received a medical degree from Oregon Health & Science University. After a residency at the UW School of Medicine, he spent his career working as an emergency room physician at Sacred Heart Medical Center in Spokane. In the early 1980s, Dr. Roundy developed Heart-Flight, the first helicopter-based critical-care transport program at Sacred Heart. He went on to serve as both medical director of Heart-Flight and co-medical director of MedStar. Dr. Roundy was an accomplished outdoorsman who enjoyed fishing, hunting and bird watching. He is survived by his wife, Deborah, and other family members and friends.

Fred Charles Cato, B.S. ’79 (prosthetics and orthotics)

Born Aug. 10, 1952
Died Aug. 14, 2014

Mr. Fred Cato joined the U.S. Army in 1973 before receiving a degree in prosthetics and orthotics from the University of Washington. He then started his own business. Known for his quick wit and vibrant personality, Mr. Cato enjoyed serving others. He spent time getting to know his patients and often challenged them to see life in a new light. Mr. Cato is survived by his wife, Donna, and other family members and friends.

James M. Volkel, M.D. ’84

Born June 16, 1953, in Evanston, Ill.
Died Jan. 24, 2015

Dr. James Volkel received a medical degree from the UW School of Medicine, then practiced emergency medicine at Battle Creek Health Systems in Michigan for 25 years, retiring in 2007. Throughout his career, Dr. Volkel was an advocate for abused women and children and others in need. He is survived by his wife, Tracy, and other family members and friends.

Thomas D. Lindquist, M.D., Res. ’85 (ophthalmology)

Died March 3, 2016, Maui, Hawaii

Dr. Thomas Lindquist helped create the largest cornea transplant program in the world. For nearly 30 years, he served as medical director for SightLife, a nonprofit global health organization that provides 25,000 corneas for transplant worldwide each year. He also served as chief of cornea and external diseases at Group Health Cooperative. With medical and doctoral degrees from the Medical College of New Jersey, Dr. Lindquist published more than 90 papers and 40 book chapters, and he co-authored five editions of the textbook Ophthalmic Surgery. He was awarded the profession’s top honor by the Eye Bank Association of America. The son of missionaries, Dr. Lindquist grew up in what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The diseases and illnesses he saw there inspired him to pursue a career in medicine. Dr. Lindquist is survived by his wife, Joan, and other family members and friends. Read more at seattletimes.com.

Vern Cherewatenko, M.D. ’86

Born June 19, 1958, in Great Falls, Mont.
Died Feb. 26, 2016, in Bellevue, Wash.

Dr. Vern Cherewatenko was an EMT for several years before being awarded a WWAMI scholarship and earning a medical degree from the UW School Medicine. He completed his residency at Valley Medical Center, practicing family medicine in Renton for 22 years. He also spent five years working at the Amen Clinic, where he specialized in brain health. Dr. Cherewatenko wrote two best-selling books, The Diabetes Cure and The Stress Cure. He also cofounded SimpleCare, a program sponsored by the American Association of Patients and Providers that focuses on delivering affordable, patient-driven services. Considered a man ahead of his time, Dr. Cherewatenko was known for his compassion and his enthusiasm. He is survived by his wife, Michelle, and other family members and friends.

Bruce Heald, PA-C (Seattle Class 22)

Born Feb. 22, 1919, in Sultan, Wash.
Died March 1, 2014

Mr. Bruce Heald spent many years in the lumber business, working for Wallace Lumber Mill in Startup, Wash., and Knoll Lumber in Kenmore. In the latter part of his career, he worked for Edmonds Roofing, where his wife, Lois, was a bookkeeper. He is survived by family and friends.

Ross C. Hoffman, Ph.D. ’92 (biochemistry)

Born June 10, 1965, in Norristown, Pa.
Died May 14, 2016, in Norristown, Pa.

Dr. Ross Hoffman received his degree in biochemistry from the University of Washington and went on to work as a biochemist for ZymoGenetics, Inc. and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at the University of California, San Diego. He also taught at Roger Williams University in Bristol, Rhode Island.

Jeffrey D. Ager, M.D., Fel. ’93 (abdominal imaging)

Born in Everett, Wash.
Died Dec. 24, 2013

Dr. Jeffrey Dwight Ager received an undergraduate degree from Stanford University and then a medical degree from Saint Louis University School of Medicine, followed by a radiology residency at Virginia Mason Medical Center and a fellowship in abdominal imaging at UW Medicine. Dr. Ager spent several decades practicing radiology in Spokane, Wash., where he embodied a genuine passion for excellence and professionalism while developing cherished friendships with colleagues and staff. Dr. Ager is survived by his wife, Leanne, and other family members and friends.

Page Moss Fletcher, M.D., Res. ’93 (psychiatry and behavioral sciences)

Born March 6, 1960, in Birmingham, Ala.
Died Jan. 30, 2015, in Hillsboro, Va.

Dr. Page Fletcher received a medical degree from the University of Virginia, and following his residency at the UW School of Medicine, he did a fellowship in geriatric psychiatry at the Seattle Veterans Affairs Medical Center. He eventually settled in Virginia, where he was a geriatric psychiatrist for 19 years. Dr. Fletcher loved music, travel and dancing. He is survived by his wife, Shannon, and other family members and friends.

Albert S. (Steve) Quinn III, PA-C (Seattle Class 21)

Died Aug. 27, 2014

Mr. Albert Quinn III graduated from St. Mary’s College in Moraga, Calif., before returning to his hometown, Seattle, and enrolling in MEDEX Northwest. He was thrilled to work as a cardiovascular perfusionist alongside renowned Seattle heart surgeon Lester Sauvage, M.D., at the Hope Heart Institute at Providence Medical Center. Mr. Quinn also spent many years working as a PA at Harborview Medical Center. In addition, he was awarded two Bronze Star Medals for his service as a medic in the Gulf War. During this time, he saw a desperate need for talent in veterans’ affairs, which led him to earn a master’s degree in business administration and to pursue a career in that field. Mr. Quinn is survived by his fiancée, Danielle, and other family members and friends.

Susan Jensen, M.D. ’96

Born Feb. 6, 1962, in Nashville, Tenn.
Died May 27, 2016, in La Grande, Ore.

Dr. Susan Jensen received a medical degree from the UW School of Medicine and completed training at Montana Family Practice Residency. In 1999, she moved to La Grande, Ore., where she practiced family medicine for 17 years. Dr. Jensen enjoyed cooking, golfing, traveling and spending time with her daughters. She is survived by her husband, Mark, and other family members and friends.

Launa J. Byington, PA-C (Seattle Class 30)

Born Aug. 15, 1957
Died Jan. 1, 2015

Ms. Launa Byington earned a degree in sports medicine and then joined the U.S. Air Force Reserves, where she became an aeromedical evacuation technician. During Desert Storm, she assisted with the evacuation of patients from Saudi Arabia to Germany. Inspired by helping others, Ms. Byington went on to graduate from MEDEX Northwest, becoming a physician’s assistant. Throughout her career, she worked at a variety of organizations, including a county jail, Job Corps, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and University of Utah Health Care.

Janice L. Hallows, Ph.D. ’99 (pharmacology)

Born Jan. 25, 1956, in Aurora, Ill.
Died May 17, 2016, in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico

Dr. Janice Hallows graduated from the University of Missouri with a degree in pharmacy. After receiving a Ph.D. in pharmacology from the University of Washington in 1993, she studied Alzheimer’s disease at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, B.C., as well as at several other labs. She and her husband moved to Ajijic, a small Mexican village, in 2013. Dr. Hallows enjoyed reading science fiction and was an avid gardener and accomplished chef. She is survived by her husband, John, and other family members and friends.

Bryan Donald Whitemarsh, M.D. ’01

Born July 21, 1969, in Provo, Utah
Died June 2, 2016, in Spanaway, Wash.

Dr. Bryan Whitemarsh received a medical degree from the UW School of Medicine and went on to practice family medicine at the MultiCare Fredrickson Clinic. Dr. Whitemarsh enjoyed photography, hiking, riding his motorcycle and building rockets.

Yogesh Khanal, M.D. ’12

Born Jan. 3, 1985
Died 2016

Dr. Yogesh Khanal graduated from Northwestern University with a bachelor’s degree in psychology. After graduation from the UW School of Medicine, he attended the Yale School of Medicine for a residency in internal medicine, serving as chief resident. In 2007, Dr. Khanal volunteered for the New Youth Children’s Development Society in Kathmandu, Nepal, which provides care for orphans and underprivileged children, and he joined their advisory board. He also traveled extensively and practiced medicine in the U.S. and internationally. Dr. Khanal had planned to start a pulmonary and critical care medicine fellowship at UCSF in summer 2016, but doctors found a large tumor in his brain, and he passed away shortly thereafter. Dr. Khanal was deeply loved by his communities at Yale and at the UW School of Medicine, and he is survived by family and friends.

Faculty and Former Faculty

Gerald D. (Ged) Allen, M.B., FFARCS

Born Dec. 2, 1924, Middlesbrough, England
Died Jan. 6, 2016

Dr. Gerald Allen earned B.S. and M.B. degrees at King’s College Medical School at the University of Durham. He served with the Royal Air Force from 1949–1951. Trained in surgery, Dr. Allen later sought additional training in anesthesia, which he completed in 1962. He and his family moved to Seattle that year, with Dr. Allen taking his place in the faculty; he served as an instructor in the schools of medicine and dentistry, later becoming an associate professor. In 1972, Dr. Allen joined the faculty at Loma Linda University in California; in 1995, he retired from UCLA as a professor emeritus. An expert in dental anesthesia and pain relief, Dr. Allen was sought after as a visiting professor nationally and internationally, and he was a dedicated researcher and prolific author. He is survived by family and friends.

George H. (Mike) Allison, M.D.

Born May 24, 1921, in Yonkers, N.Y.
Died March 19, 2016, in Seattle, Wash.

Dr. George Allison, an emeritus faculty member at UW Medicine, attended the University of Rochester, and then the Yale School of Medicine — while serving in the U.S. Navy. After a stint at California’s Camp Shoemaker Naval Hospital, Dr. Allison entered psychiatric training at the Menninger School of Psychiatry in Topeka, Kan. During the Korean War, he served as a psychiatrist at Camp Pendleton Naval Hospital in Oceanside, Calif., before moving to Seattle and opening a psychoanalytic practice. He also served as director of the Seattle Psychoanalytic Institute, president of the American Psychoanalytic Association, and an adjunct professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at UW Medicine. Dr. Allison, known for his intellectual curiosity and his kindness, was one of the first credentialed training analysts in the Northwest, and he helped develop national standards for quality of psychoanalytic training and practice. He also enjoyed sports and biking to work and competed with — often beating — family members on the tennis court well into his eighties. He is survived by his wife, Joan, and other family members and friends.

David P. Christie, M.D.

Died Feb. 19, 2016

Dr. David Parker Christie, an emeritus faculty member at UW Medicine, was a longtime radiologist at Harborview Medical Center with a natural bent for teaching and a profound curiosity. Dr. Christie grew up in Omaha, Neb., and, after graduating high school, he became a janitor in a hospital’s surgery department. Later, Dr. Christie became an x-ray technician, a job that inspired him to become a radiologist. He volunteered at sites around the world, including at a hospital in Thailand and in Moshi, Tanzania, where he worked off and on for many years. He was always quick with a story, a passage from Shakespeare or some sage advice. Dr. Christie is survived by family members and friends.

D. Kay Clawson, M.D.

Died March 11, 2016, in Rancho Mirage, Calif.

Dr. D. Kay Clawson joined the U.S. Navy Hospital Corps in 1945; after an honorable discharge, he attended Harvard Medical School on a scholarship, completed an internship in general surgery at Stanford University Hospital, and completed a residency in orthopedic surgery and an international fellowship. For 17 years, Dr. Clawson served as the head of orthopedic surgery at UW Medicine; while here, he helped develop Harborview Medical Center as a trauma center, designed a sliding hip screw that would become the standard treatment for a specific type of hip fracture, and consulted on orthopedic care in Southeastern Alaska. Dr. Clawson then served as the dean of the University of Kentucky College of Medicine and as executive vice chancellor at the University of Kansas Medical Center. He was a founding member of both the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine and of the Association of Orthopedic Chairmen, and he served as president of the Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons, on the executive committee of the Association of American Medical Colleges and as associate editor of the Journal of Clinical Orthopedics, among other honors and commitments. Dr. Clawson loved history and gardening, and he is survived by his wife, Janet, and other family members and friends.

James A. Donaldson, M.D.

Born Jan. 22, 1930, in St. Cloud, Minn.
Died March 20, 2016, in Redmond, Wash.

Dr. James A. Donaldson, an emeritus faculty member at UW Medicine, attended Shattuck Military Academy, MIT, the University of Minnesota and the University of Minnesota Medical School. Following two years in the U.S. Public Health Service, he completed a fellowship at the Otologic Medical Group (now the House Ear Clinic, Los Angeles) and then joined the faculty at the University of Iowa. In 1965, Dr. Donaldson was appointed to chair the newly created UW Medicine Department of Otolaryngology. The following year, he co-published Surgical Anatomy of the Temporal Bone and Ear, still the standard text in its field. Dr. Donaldson enjoyed designing and making things, from furniture to camping equipment, and he designed the Donaldson ear tube, one of the first commercial ear tubes. Dr. Donaldson loved hiking and camping with his family, computer programming and reading history and biographies. He is survived by his wife of more than 65 years, Maylie, and other family members and friends.

Barton Scott Johnson, DDS

Born March 29, 1961, in Burbank, Calif.
Died June 30, 2016, in Seattle, Wash.

Dr. Barton Johnson graduated from the University of Southern California and received a doctorate of dental surgery degree from UCLA, as well as completing a hospital dental residency and earning a master’s of science in oral biology. Dr. Johnson was then recruited to lead the Hospital Dental Residency Program at the University of Washington; he was also a clinical associate professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology. He remained on UW faculty as the residency director and until 2007. Dr. Johnson also co-founded Seattle Special Care Dentistry and concurrently established the Swedish Medical Center Hospital Dental Residency Program, where he spent the remainder of his career as program director. Dr. Johnson was a popular lecturer, and he co-edited the textbook Pharmacology and Therapeutics for Dentistry. He was named Washington State Dental Association’s Citizen of the Year in 2014 for his efforts in caring for the underserved. Dr. Johnson spent his free time biking, kayaking and being outdoors, and he was especially proud to have summited Mount Rainier shortly after his 50th birthday. He is survived by family members and friends.

Paul J. Joyce, Ph.D.

Born Sept. 26, 1958, in Butte, Mt.
Died April 22, 2016

Dr. Paul Joseph Joyce obtained a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in mathematics from Montana State University, followed by a doctorate from the University of Utah. He was an affiliate professor at UW Medicine’s Department of Biomedical Informatics as well as a visiting faculty member at the University of Southern California and a visiting scholar at University College London. In 1991, he took a faculty position at the University of Idaho in Moscow, where he held several positions, including his latest position, dean of the College of Science. Dr. Joyce mentored many young mathematicians, statisticians and biologists who carry on his legacy. He was also the associate editor of Biology Letters and a fellow of the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences at the University of Cambridge in the U.K. Colleagues remember Dr. Joyce for his dedication to his field as well as his humor, charisma and devotion to math jokes. He is survived by his wife, Jana, and other family members and friends.

Seymour J. Klebanoff, Ph.D.

Born Feb. 3, 1927
Died Aug. 31, 2016, in Seattle, Wash.

Dr. Seymour Klebanoff, an emeritus faculty member at UW Medicine, was a world leader in the study of how white blood cells kill bacteria. In 1967, he and his colleague, Dr. Robert Clark, published a seminal work on the topic titled The Neutrophil: Function and Clinical Disorders. Through this discovery and other research, Dr. Klebanoff changed science’s understanding of the body’s natural defense mechanisms in fighting infections. He also advanced knowledge about inflammation and brought about new insights and approaches in the study of cancer, viruses (including HIV) and other infectious diseases. Dr. Klebanoff joined the faculty at UW Medicine in 1962, and he served as the head of the Division of Allergy and Infectious Diseases from 1976 to 1994. He received numerous awards, including the prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association of American Medical Colleges for Distinguished Research in Biomedical Science in 2007. Dr. Klebanoff is survived by his wife of 65 years, Evelyn, and other family members and friends. Read more about his life at newsbeat.uw.edu.

James W.M. Owens, M.D.

Born April 11, 1934, in Syracuse, N.Y.
Died Nov. 1, 2014

Dr. James Owens, an emeritus faculty member at UW Medicine, graduated from Cornell University and then obtained a medical degree from the State University of New York Medical School. He completed a residency and chief residency in pediatrics at New York Hospital before coming to Seattle to serve in the Public Health Service. After working in private practice for a few years, Dr. Owens joined the pediatrics faculty at UW Medicine and soon thereafter became the medical director for Echo Glen Children’s Center in North Bend, Wash., where he worked for 30 years with incarcerated children and youth. Throughout his life, Dr. Owens worked to ensure the quality of basic health care in America’s jails, prisons and juvenile facilities through the National Commission on Correctional Health Care. He also set up health delivery systems in areas experiencing refugee crises around the world. In recognition of his outstanding volunteer work, he received the Jefferson Award from the American Institute of Public Service. Dr. Owens loved all kinds of music and regularly attended the opera, the symphony, musicals, plays and concerts. He is survived by his wife of 49 years, Ann, and other family members and friends.

Friends

Rex J. (Jim) Bates, MBA

Born Nov. 9, 1923, in Seattle, Wash.
Died March 8, 2016

Mr. Rex James (Jim) Bates enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1942 and was recruited into the Army Air Corps Weather Reconnaissance Squadron. He received the Purple Heart and the Air Medal for aiding in the rescue of several of his crewmates after his plane dove into the South Pacific. After his service, he earned an MBA from the University of Chicago School of Business, then joined the investment firm Stein Roe & Farnham. For the next 23 years, he worked as a stock and bond analyst. In 1972, Mr. Bates became financial vice president of State Farm Insurance in Bloomington, Ill., where he worked for 19 years improving the company’s financial sustainability. He was elected to the boards of directors of State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company and all of its affiliates, and he retired in 1991 as mutual company vice chairman. He was a trustee of Illinois Wesleyan University and the Brookings Institution. A lifelong birder, Mr. Bates served as a trustee of the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology for many years; he also enjoyed collecting stamps, playing tennis and salmon fishing. A UW Medicine Benefactor, Mr. Bates was also a generous contributor to scholarship funds and to bioengineering. He is survived by family members and friends.

Irene Curran

Born Aug. 14, 1924, in Preston, Wash.
Died Jan. 9, 2016

Mrs. Irene Winifred (Brick) Curran, a UW Medicine Laureate, was raised in Tacoma, Wash. During World War II, Mrs. Curran worked at Fredrick & Nelson, also serving as a “Rosie the riveter” with her sister, June. She married her husband, Jack, in 1943, when he returned from military service. Mrs. Curran was a strong community advocate and volunteer, active in the Milk Fund and the PTA through her daughters’ schools, and serving on the Cornish College of the Arts board and on the Northwest Hospital & Medical Center’s foundation board. Mrs. Curran established the Jack and Irene Curran Fountain Plaza on the hospital’s grounds, and she and her family also created the Ron Dolan Memorial Endowment at the hospital, which provides defibrillators (and trainings on how to use them) at several local golf courses. She was an avid golfer; she also enjoyed bridge, singing and painting. Mrs. Curran is survived by family members and friends. If you would like to make a gift in her honor, please make a check out to the UW Foundation, indicate “Curran memorial, Northwest Hospital” in the memo line, and send it to UW Medicine Advancement, Box 358045, Seattle, WA 98195.

Jeannette Delimitros

Born in 1942 in Kansas City
Died May 12, 2016, in Dallas, Texas

Mrs. Jeannette Delimitros spent her childhood in Kenai, Alaska, and Burlington, Wash. She eventually called Texas home, having moved with her family to Houston in 1980. She then spent more than30 years in Dallas. Mrs. Delimitros enjoyed travel and had an adventurous, fun-loving spirit. She was also a UW Medicine Benefactor who contributed to prostate cancer research. Mrs. Delimitros is survived by her husband of 50 years, Tom, and other family members and friends.

 

Robert W. Lundeen

Born June 25, 1921, in Astoria, Ore.
Died April 13, 2016, in Lake Oswego, Ore.

Mr. Robert West (Bob) Lundeen, a UW Medicine Laureate, grew up in Westport, Ore., and attended Oregon State University (then Oregon State College), where he met his wife, Betty, and graduated with a degree in chemical engineering. After Pearl Harbor, Mr. Lundeen enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps and was assigned to the 10th Weather Squadron in China. He reached the rank of major and earned a Bronze Star for his service. When he returned to the U.S., he began a 40-year career with Dow Chemical Company, starting as a chemical engineer. He later served in leadership positions for the company’s branches in Asia and Latin America, and, ultimately, as an executive vice president. He was named chairman of the board in 1982 and retired in 1986. Mr. Lundeen was a passionate advocate for medical care, especially in rural areas, and a great supporter of education and UW Medicine, establishing funds to support resident training in urology and neurological surgery, helping create a professorship in rural health, and supporting students with scholarships. He also served for nearly 20 years on a variety of UW Medicine committees. “Bob was generous with all his resources — his finances, his time, his understanding of the needs of rural communities,” says Paul G. Ramsey, CEO of UW Medicine. “We were fortunate to have his friendship, and we and our students will remember him and Betty for many years to come.”

Mr. Lundeen is survived by family members and friends. If you would like to make a gift in his honor, please make a check out to the UW Foundation, indicate “Lundeen memorial” in the memo line, and send it to UW Medicine Advancement, Box 358045, Seattle, WA 98195.

Mary Louise Nugent Thie

Born July 5, 1919
Died Jan. 4, 2016

Mrs. Mary Louise Nugent Thie grew up in southern Indiana, and she was the first person in her family to graduate from college, receiving a degree in education from Butler University in 1942. That same year, she married Lawrence Henry Thie. They moved around the country during World War II as he fulfilled his military service obligation, and they later moved around the world during Mr. Thie’s career in the U.S. Agency for International Development. Mrs. Thie’s career, in elementary education, included serving in schools in Indiana, Nepal, Korea, Virginia and Oak Harbor, Wash. She enjoyed teaching, the outdoors, Hoosier basketball and Husky football, and she kept a daily diary for 80 years. The Thies believed in making a difference in the lives of others, and, as UW Medicine Benefactors, they gave generously to support the Virginia Merrill Bloedel Hearing Research Center in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. Mrs. Thie is survived by family and friends.

Elizabeth M. Welty, M.D.

Born 1915, in Pennsylvania
Died Sept. 6, 2016, in Spokane, Wash.

Dr. Elizabeth Welty received a medical degree from Cornell University. After she graduated, she began an internship in New York City, where she met her husband, Robert, also a physician. Eventually, she and Robert settled in Spokane, Wash., where she practiced medicine, retiring in 1985. Dr. Welty was known for her avid support of the arts, which earned her many community awards over the years, including the Bravo Award and the YMCA Women of Achievement Individual Benefactor Award; in fact, the Spokane Symphony commissioned a piece titled Elizabeth by pianist Thiwangkorn Lilit in her honor. Serving on the boards of several organizations, such as the Visiting Nurses Association and the Spokane Symphony, Dr. Welty was named to the Spokane Citizens Hall of Fame. She was also a UW Medicine Benefactor, and she contributed to the Department of Surgery and to scholarships for M.D. students. Read more at spokesman.com.” Photo: Rick Singer Photography.

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