Post-Study Abroad Reflections

By: Travis Rind, Foster Undergraduate

The last few days spent in Manchester were bittersweet and filled with some of the most memorable times of the entire experience. Fortunately, most lectures were cancelled to give students extra time to prepare for examinations in January (or, perhaps to have an earlier Christmas holiday). In any case, the exchange students had the short end of the stick as we were stuck finishing up our final essays. Traditionally classes let out mid-December and students return towards the end of January for final examinations. But, being on exchange and unable to return, our assessments consisted of 2,000 to 3,000 word essays. Just two of mine were due before leaving Manchester, so I was working on my remaining three well into the beginning of Winter Quarter at UW. Results aren’t returned until early March, so there is a long and anxiety-filled waiting period!

Already I miss the sense of spontaneity, adventurousness, and openness to try new experiences. Not only visiting, but truly living in, another country forces you to change your mindset, learn to be more flexible, and adapt to the unexpected. For better or for worse, I have returned to the relative comfort of home. There are no more missed buses, language barriers, or unusual foods here in Seattle. While it was often times frustrating and stressful dealing with such circumstances at the time, I now cannot help but long for the feeling of knowing that there is so much left to explore and experience right in the palm of my hands.

Having met so many people from more than a dozen countries, I am proud to now say that I have forged such strong friendships with these individuals and sincerely cannot wait until I can see them again. I know I will travel again soon, and encourage everyone to grasp that opportunity.

My advice to anyone considering living, working, or studying abroad would be to simply do it. It’s too easy and convenient to make excuses for not doing it – it’s expensive, I don’t speak the language, it’s uncomfortable, I don’t know what I’m doing, what if something goes wrong. I’m sure your experience will be similar to mine, in that you’ll find that the similarities vastly outnumber the differences and that at the core, most people are truly benevolent and overwhelmingly welcoming towards others.

 


Posted by goabroad - March 6th, 2013 - 0 comments - Permalink



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