Returning to the States – Reverse Culture Shock

By: Jasmine Reliford, Foster Undergraudate

As finals came to an end in Australia, I decided to do all the things that I had not yet done but said I would; everything from visiting the Blue Mountains (see photo) to being at the Sydney Opera House at sunrise (see photo).  I spent my last hours with my friends who were from around the world and from around the United States. The perfect end to my trip was spending it with the people I grew so close to at an iconic location of Australia. So I hopped on the plane home that night and 14 hours later I landed at SFO.

I was nervous to see my friends and adjust back to American style living, which was ironic because just a few months before I was complaining about the Australian culture and how NOT American it is. Since Australia’s summer starts in December I had a full month and a half of relaxing before I had to head back to Seattle. It was not until school started and being exposed to the Seattle winter, that I realize that I was not in OZ anymore.

While my Aussie friends have a three month break in 100 degree weather, I am sitting in class bundled up in 30 degree weather. My weekends that were once filled with going to the beach, or traveling to New Zealand or the Great Barrier Reef or Melbourne were not consumed with studying in a heated apartment. I still keep in contact with all of my close friends from abroad and we all complain about being back and having to do American style schooling together. I think that is what has allowed me to get through this tough transition period. It is finding people who are just as shocked to be back as you are. While the adjustment is tough at times, and I feel that everything out of my mouth is “In Australia they do this…” or “When I was abroad…”, I would not change that experience for the world. Being abroad you learn so much about that country you study in, about American culture and world views about America, and most importantly you learn so much about yourself. Your comfort limits are pushed, and you learn who you really are when you are plopped in a country and forced to figure EVERYTHING out. The transition back is worth every moment, every picture, and every memory I had while I was abroad.


Posted by goabroad - January 31st, 2013 - 0 comments - Permalink



Both comments and pings are currently closed.

Comments are closed.