students

Certificate Student Winter Spotlight: Jaclyn Escudero

Second-year MPH in Global Health and Global WACh Certificate Student, Jaclyn Escudero, had an exciting year as a research assistant for Global WACh’s “PrEP Adherence Among AGYW: A Multidimensional Evaluation” study (an extension of the PrIYA and PrIMA studies), which is funded by the NIH and led by Drs. Grace John-Stewart (Global WACh Director) and Pamela Kohler (Associate Professor, Global Health and Psychosocial and Community Health).  Jaclyn assisted Dr. Jillian Pintye (Research Fellow, Global Health) in developing one of two research protocols to evaluate the factors that influence PrEP uptake, continuation, and adherence among adolescent girls and young women (AGYW) in Kenya.

Global WACh Student Researchers Feature Posters at the 2019 Global Healthies

Photo credit: UW School of Public Health

On January 23rd, the University of Washington Department of Global Health held its annual Global Healthies Opportunities Fair and Poster Competition, which seeks to strengthen connections and start new collaborations for better global health impacts.  It was an exciting evening with a large presence of Global WACh faculty, staff, students and colleagues engaging around our Center’s research and training opportunities.

This year, 12 Global WACh research assistants and Certificate students competed in the poster competition across four distinct categories (Discovery and Development, Education and Training, Implementation and Application, and Public Health Service and Direct Care).  Research assistant, Danae Black (PhD Candidate in Epidemiology), had the winning poster in the Public Service and Direct Care category!  Her research unveiled new data in an area not well studied—the burden of tuberculosis (TB) and utilization of TB preventative therapies for HIV-infected adolescents in Kenya.  These therapies entail daily oral medication taken for up to six months without interruption to effectively prevent TB.  Danae’s findings identified frequent medication shortages across 101 HIV care facilities, meaning that a large number of patients exposed to TB have started therapy, but few have completed it.  The gaps leave patients, whose immune systems are weakened by HIV, at higher risk of developing potentially severe forms of TB.  The impact of Danae’s findings can help researchers better understand the current TB prevention efforts in Kenya and find ways to systematically improve health outcomes in this vulnerable population.

We are so proud of all our student researchers and their achievements.  Well done!

Certificate Student Fall Spotlight: Marissa Masidhas and Manahil Siddiqi

Marissa Masihdas, Second-year Doctor of Nursing Practice-Family Nurse Practitioner student
Over the summer, Marissa and fellow UW Nursing students (Morgan Busse, Jane Kim, and Yvette Rodriguez) traveled with their faculty advisor, Dr. Sarah Gimbel (Associate Professor of Global Health, and Family and Child Nursing) to the floating community of Claverito in Iquitos, Peru to support a piloted community-based health education program they developed, in which residents identify the health topics they wanted to learn about—the community chose diarrhea management and early childhood education.

Marissa (far left) with her peers from Academic Familiar de Amazonas.

Spotlight on Global WACh Certificate Students: Elizabeth Karman and Sheldon Halstead

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Second year MPH students, Elizabeth and Sheldon recently returned from a six-month stay in Gondar, Ethiopia as SCOPE Fellows. Both students provided invaluable support on the Faith Leaders Advocating for Maternal Empowerment (FLAME) study, which aims to validate SCOPE’s strategy of integrating local Orthodox Priests into community-level health promotion. Elizabeth visited rural health centers to assess the maternity care services available, and worked with an interdisciplinary team of Ethiopian providers and researchers to analyze and map the data collected. Sheldon assisted a University of Gondar study team with the development and implementation of qualitative baseline data collection, namely focus group discussions with religious leaders, pregnant women, and male partners. Elizabeth’s assessment data and Sheldon’s results from the discussions will be used to inform and optimize the FLAME intervention.

Certificate capstone brings together experts in adolescent health to understand early gender socialization

In fulfillment of her Global WACh Certificate Capstone, Marina Plesons worked with a team of adolescent, sexual, and reproductive health professionals from the WHO, USAID, Gates Foundation, and the David & Lucille Packard Foundation to write a commentary for the Journal of Adolescent Health. The paper considers the implications for action and research of the Global Early Adolescent Study’s formative qualitative research on gender socialization.

GEASThe Global Early Adolescent Study (GEAS) aims to understand the factors in early adolescence that predispose young people to subsequent sexual health risks, and conversely promote sexual and reproductive health and well-being. In her capstone presentation last week, Marina commented on the fact that ages 10-14 are among the most critical for human development, but are a comparatively poorly understood life stage. This work thus serves to investigate the social processes that shape young people’s health and development, especially as this relates to gender norms informing adolescent sexuality.

Gender inequities are a key underlying determinant of the sex-specific differentials in morbidity and mortality of adults, and adolescents. Gender inequities manifest in different ways, such as discriminatory laws, policies, and socio-cultural practices or unequal power, access, and control over resources. At the root of inequities are gender norms and attitudes, which prescribe different status, power, access, and behaviors (including in relationships) according to culturally appropriate expectations for males and females. If we understand how gender norms for young adolescents are enforced, reinforced, challenged, and accepted, then we can be better address these in programs and interventions to improve adolescent and adult health.

Marina’s contributions to the paper included key themes in which gender norms and attitudes manifest in the lives of young adolescents, their peers, and their families in a number of countries. The team then extrapolated seven key programmatic and policy recommendations for ways that the global community can promote gender equitable norms and attitudes in early adolescence.

We can expect the paper to be included as part of a Journal of Adolescent Health special supplement this year, featuring the results from Marina’s work. We look forward to sharing when it is released!

Throughmarinaout her capstone and internship with the WHO, Marina also worked closely with her faculty advisor, Dr. Donna Denno.

Marina Plesons is an MPH candidate in the department of Global Health, and President and Co-founder of Health Advocacy Innovations, Inc.

Celebrating International Day of Women and Girls in Science

Over the past 15 years, the global community has made concerted efforts to inspire and engage women and girls in science. According to a study conducted in 14 countries, the probability of a female student graduating with a Bachelor’s degree, Master’s degree and Doctor’s degree in a science-related field are 18%, 8% and 2% respectively, while the percentages of male students are 37%, 18% and 6%.

The UN General Assembly recognizes that full and equal access to and participation in science, technology, and innovation is imperative for empowering women and girls of all ages. As a response, one year ago the General Assembly declared February 11th as the International Day of Women and Girls in Science.

This weekend we celebrate the Day in recognition of the critical role women and girls play in science and technology communities—including education, training, and research activities at all levels. To observe International Day of Women and Girls in Science, we are highlighting three members of our Graduate Certificate program. These three students are each making meaningful contributions to their respective scientific fields, and, they are also women.

HFrizzellHannah Frizzell is a third year PhD student in the Department of Bioengineering. She received her Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering and is currently a graduate research fellow working on mucosal immunoengineering, vaccines, drug delivery, and how these relate to women’s and children’s health on a global scale. Hannah is the Vice President of Funding at UW’s Bioengineers without Borders, which develops medical devices for resource-limited areas. She mentors a team focused on a low-cost device for diagnosis of pre-eclampsia in pregnant women. Hannah is also a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow and a Roche/Achievement Awards for College Scientists (ARCS) scholar. As she progresses in her field, she hopes to apply both her technical background and experience from the Global WACh program to create and integrate medical technologies into communities to improve their accessibility and thus ultimate effectiveness in improving health globally.

Ke-Pan-200x300Ke Pan is an MPH student in the Department of Global Health, having received her BA in Public Health with a concentration in Maternal and Child Health from Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST) and Masters Degree in Medicine from Third Military Medical University in China. Prior to coming to UW, she worked as a resident in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology for three years and conducted research about the quality of women’s life after surgery for Pelvic Organ Prolapse. She also conducted a research regarding the prevalence of hypertension and obesity in adolescents. Ke Pan is deeply interested in improving global health disparities of women, adolescents and children through education, awareness, and access to healthcare.

MollyFeder_PhotoMolly Feder is an MPH student in the Department of Epidemiology with a concentration in Maternal and Child Health. She received her BA in International Affairs concentrating in Global Health from the Elliott School of International Affairs at the George Washington University. Prior to attending UW, Molly worked as a Government Relations Associate and Database Administrator at the Council for Responsible Nutrition in Washington, DC where she advocated for enhanced FDA oversight of the vitamin and supplement industry. As an MPH student, Molly is a Maternal and Child Health Trainee and is interested in research pertaining to family planning and reproductive health.

We’re proud of the interdisciplinary commitment these three students have made to advance health care globally within the fields of women, adolescent, and child health. Please click here to learn about each of our fantastic certificate students and the impact they are making in their fields.

On the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, we also hear from Chief Information Technology Officer of the United Nations, Atefah “Atti” Riazi, who urges all girls to aspire to be ‘geeks.’ Click here to read.

Introducing the New Class of Global WACh Certificate Students

As we welcome the start of another academic year here at the University of Washington, we also welcome a group of highly motivated graduate students to the Global WACh Certificate Program. These seven new students join the 12 current members of our certificate program, entering a robust interdisciplinary community dedicated to improving the health of women, adolescents, and children.

From refugee resettlement work in Philadelphia, to Peace Corps service in Burkina Faso, these students’ experiences span multiple countries and disciplines, making them among the University of Washington’s most qualified graduate students to impact health around the globe. Read about each of our new students below, and please join us in welcoming them to the Global WACh community!


 

jadeJade Fairbanks is an MPH student in the Department of Health Services, and received her BA in Public Health and Medical Anthropology from the University of Washington. Prior to starting the MPH program, Jade was a Peace Corps volunteer in Burkina Faso, working in the field of reproductive health education, and improving health services and delivery at the village maternity. She spent last summer working as a GO Health Fellow in Merrueshi, Kenya to develop an all-girls mentorship program titled “Yes S.H.E. Can: Sharing Her Empowerment” as well as a training manual for community health workers to educate on childhood malnutrition, and implement mandatory malnutrition screenings.  Within the field of maternal and child health, she is particularly interested in expanding access to family planning services and reducing adolescent and unwanted pregnancies through educational outreach and program implementation.

HFrizzellHannah Frizzell is a third year Ph. D. student in the department of Bioengineering. She received her Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Texas, Austin and completed a minor in Spanish. She is currently a graduate research fellow working with Dr. Kim A. Woodrow, focusing on mucosal immunoengineering, vaccines, drug delivery, and how these relate to women’s and children’s health on a global scale. Her current work is centered around improving oral vaccination through the combination of biotechnology and immunology. Hannah is the Vice President of Funding of University of Washington Bioengineers without Borders, which develops medical devices for resource-limited areas. She mentors a teams focused on a low-cost device for diagnosis of pre-eclampsia in pregnant women. Hannah is also a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow and a Roche/Achievement Awards for College Scientists (ARCS) scholar. As she progresses in her field, she hopes to apply both her technical background and experience from the Global WACh program to create and integrate medical technologies into communities to improve their accessibility and thus ultimate effectiveness in improving health globally.

Isatou Jallow is pursuing a Masters of Law in Sustainable International Development. A lawyer and refugee from Gambia, Isatou is interested in many different human rights and development-related legal issues. She received her BA in Law and Political Science from the University Mohamed V in Rabat, Morocco. More recently at the University of Washington, she completed a year of service at the University of Washington School of Law’s Development Innovation Lab, where she researched conditions of women mining in the DRC and contributed to the formation of an NGO to assist these communities. One focus in particular is on the eradication of Female Genital Mutilation among immigrant communities in the U.S. She has spoken at the invitation of a number of organizations in the Seattle area, including UW Medicine/Harborview, the Northwest Immigrants’ Rights Project, and Somali Maternity Services, providing a perspective for health care workers and others working with immigrants and survivors of Female Genital Mutilation from Sub-Saharan Africa.

CaptureShadae Paul is pursuing a joint Master’s degree in Public Health and Public Administration and is interested in learning methods to increase women’s access to resources and services in their communities. After earning her BA at University of Maryland, College Park, Shadae served as a Peace Corps Community Health Promotion Facilitator in Fiji- an experience which serves as the foundation for her interest in global maternal and child health. She has spent many years working with women, children, and families both locally and internationally, including organizations such as the International Rescue Committee (IRC), March of Dimes, Mary’s Center, and Hagerstown Birth. Shadae looks forward to strengthening interdisciplinary skills needed to address complex global health issues through the Global WACh certificate program.

Lauren Rotkis is a candidate in the Pediatric Doctorate of Nursing Practice program. She completed a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the University of Washington, a Master of Science in Complementary and Alternative Medicine from Georgetown University, and a Bachelor of Arts in Neuroscience from Washington University in St. Louis. Within the global health field, she is particularly drawn to working with adolescent populations who are at a unique stage of self-discovery and self-determination. Having grown up in Seattle, Lauren has observed societal and political shifts that have led to an increasingly vulnerable marginalized population of teens. She currently volunteers at the Country Doctor Free Teen clinic, which is an evening health clinic for homeless teens. It is this experience that has had a defining role in shaping Lauren’s career goals. She plans to continue working with vulnerable teens as a Nurse Practitioner, either in a school-based health clinic, Juvenile Detention or a primary care clinic with a specific focus on nutrition and stress-related health effects.

Face3Gladys Salgado is a MPA candidate in the Evans School of Public Policy. As a native of Colombia, South America, Gladys grew up in a large family who taught her valuable lessons on what it means to be rich without having money, the importance of family above all, and the difference between poverty and despair. After a long career in Information Technology, Gladys is embarking on a new career in public service. Following her move to Seattle, she became restless by the abundance of social ills surrounding her such as homelessness, obesity, and untreated mental health disorders, and has decided to put her skills and experience toward helping make systemic changes from within on a full-time basis. 

Manahil Siddiqi PhotoManahil Siddiqi is an MPH student in the Community-Oriented Public Health Practice program. Her primary interest is in global health, particularly health politics and health systems strengthening with a focus on women and children. Manahil graduated with distinction in her self-designed major in Global Health from Bryn Mawr College in 2015, where she was the recipient of several honors commending her public health achievements in Philadelphia, England, and Nicaragua. Prior to joining the University of Washington, Manahil conducted research on refugee mothering, resettlement and mental health among conflict-affected populations, including refugee families resettling in Philadelphia. The principles of social justice, human rights and collective action fuel Manahil’s scholarship and advocacy.

The Next Big thing: Adolescent Health

You’re invited to our end of year celebration showcasing the achievements of Global WACh students, faculty, grantees, and scholars around the world.

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Keynote Speaker: Dr. Bruder Stapleton, Chair of the Department of Pediatrics

Other Speakers include Drs. Minnie Kibore, Meghan Moreno, Pamela Kohler and Anthony Roche.

Event Details:

Thursday, June 2nd 2016
Foege Auditorium, University of Washington
3720 15th Avenue NE
Seattle, WA 98105

Global WACh WHO Scholar Focus – Annie Hoopes

hoopes2Have we mentioned we have amazing students?

Annie Hoopes, MD, is one of our Global WACh Certificate Program students and a World Health Organization (WHO) Scholar.  She is also a pediatrician and is currently completing a fellowship in adolescent medicine at the University of Washington and Seattle Children’s Hospital. Through her collaboration on a systematic review of adolescent sexual and reproductive health services with Dr. Donna Denno, Annie met co-author Dr. Venkatraman Chandra-Mouli, an international expert in adolescent health services with the WHO. Dr. Chandra-Mouli subsequently invited Annie to the WHO in Geneva to work as an intern in the Division of Reproductive Health and Research during summer 2014. This provided a great opportunity for mentorship forher, as she is interested in promoting adolescent sexual and reproductive health in resource-limited settings. At WHO, Annie worked with the Adolescents and At-Risk Populations Team where she gained an understanding of how agencies like WHO, World Bank, UNICEF, and UN work in partnership to promote sexual and reproductive health.

We want to ensure that ever-shrinking resources for adolescent health are being directed toward programs with proven adolescent health and psychosocial benefits.”

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Annie’s passion to ensure adolescents get the resources they need was central to her task at WHO of reviewing the effectiveness of programs in countries implementing adolescent-friendly services. She began with systematic review of adolescent health initiatives in India.  She also studied how adolescents are addressed  in national reproductive  health policies, using South Africa as a case study.

Annie is back in Seattle now for her final year of fellowship and public health training and is looking forward to applying these experiences for the next steps in her career.

When we know 2.1 million adolescents age 10-19 are living with HIV in low- and middle-income countries  and one in five women worldwide has a child before age 18,  it is undeniable that our health systems must ensure that  age- and context-appropriate preventive and treatment interventions reach this vulnerable population”

Keep up the great work, Annie!