Current Awardees

“Promoting Healthy Families and Relationships: Exploring Domestic Violence and Tribal Community Culture to Inform Best Practices”

Year Awarded:

2013

Location:

Swinomish Indian Tribal Community, Washington State, USA

Principal Investigators:

Dr. Sandra M. Radin, Dr. Teresa A. Evans-Campbell

Abstract:

Domestic violence is prevalent in many American Indian  communities, yet American Indian domestic violence research and culturally appropriate and effective interventions are lacking. To better understand domestic violence and inform best practices in one American Indian tribal community, our community-university team will utilize quantitative and qualitative data and a Grounded Theory approach to: determine domestic violence prevalence; describe community members’ attitudes, beliefs, and the sociocultural/historical milieu around women and children’s safety; assess existing resources and needs; and identify 1-2 existing evidence based domestic violence interventions that meet local needs and may be appropriately and effectively adapted to local culture and setting.

“Intergenerational Adversity and Epigenetic Markers of Cardiometabolic Risk Among Young Adult Women in the Jerusalem Perinatal Study”

Year Awarded:

2013

Location:

Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel

Principal Investigators:

Dr. Daniel A. Enquobahrie, Dr. Amelia Gavin

Abstract:

The study will provide empirical evidence within a life course framework for associations of early life socio-economic status, epigenetic (more specifically DNA methylation) changes, and Cardiometabolic health in the context of a transitioning industrialized nation.The study takes a unique approach in linking two critical social determinants of health identified by the World Health Organization: women’s social status and early childhood development. While observations suggestive of intergenerational effects of adverse socio-economic status are accumulating, the actual biological pathways that link experiences of early life adversity in women to health during their pregnancies, and the health of their offspring remain understudied and poorly understood. Empirical studies are few and this project would represent one of the first to assess early life adversity-related methylation patterns in genes important to women’s cardiometabolic health. To our knowledge, it would be the first to link early life socio-economic adversity, variation of methylation in specific cardiometabolic genes, and adulthood cardiometabolic risk. Clinically, identifying biomarkers of early life adversity in peripheral blood, an easily accessible tissue, and linking them to adulthood cardiometabolic health has the potential to help target women that may benefit from directed preventative and/or perinatal health care services.