Scholars

Global WACh WHO Scholar Focus – Annie Hoopes

hoopes2Have we mentioned we have amazing students?

Annie Hoopes, MD, is one of our Global WACh Certificate Program students and a World Health Organization (WHO) Scholar.  She is also a pediatrician and is currently completing a fellowship in adolescent medicine at the University of Washington and Seattle Children’s Hospital. Through her collaboration on a systematic review of adolescent sexual and reproductive health services with Dr. Donna Denno, Annie met co-author Dr. Venkatraman Chandra-Mouli, an international expert in adolescent health services with the WHO. Dr. Chandra-Mouli subsequently invited Annie to the WHO in Geneva to work as an intern in the Division of Reproductive Health and Research during summer 2014. This provided a great opportunity for mentorship forher, as she is interested in promoting adolescent sexual and reproductive health in resource-limited settings. At WHO, Annie worked with the Adolescents and At-Risk Populations Team where she gained an understanding of how agencies like WHO, World Bank, UNICEF, and UN work in partnership to promote sexual and reproductive health.

We want to ensure that ever-shrinking resources for adolescent health are being directed toward programs with proven adolescent health and psychosocial benefits.”

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Annie’s passion to ensure adolescents get the resources they need was central to her task at WHO of reviewing the effectiveness of programs in countries implementing adolescent-friendly services. She began with systematic review of adolescent health initiatives in India.  She also studied how adolescents are addressed  in national reproductive  health policies, using South Africa as a case study.

Annie is back in Seattle now for her final year of fellowship and public health training and is looking forward to applying these experiences for the next steps in her career.

When we know 2.1 million adolescents age 10-19 are living with HIV in low- and middle-income countries  and one in five women worldwide has a child before age 18,  it is undeniable that our health systems must ensure that  age- and context-appropriate preventive and treatment interventions reach this vulnerable population”

Keep up the great work, Annie!

Our SCOPE Scholars in Action – Emily Robinson

ethiopia-fb-164One of the truly incredible things about our scholars is that they’re able to get out into the world to experience the joy of helping others while positively contributing to the field of Global Health. Emily Robinson (UW Doctorate of Nursing Practice student), and Kate Pfizenmaier (UW Master of Public Administration student) have been doing just that in Gondar, Ethiopia. They are our 2014 SCOPE fellows, and have been in Gondar for 3 months.

SCOPE (Strengthening Core Opportunities Through Partnership in Ethiopia) helps link medical and religious communities in order to better prevent HIV infection and deliver comprehensive care to those in need, particularly pregnant women and new mothers and babies. “One of the most important things I will take away from this experience is the importance of listening,” says Emily, “not just with my ears, but also with my heart. I have so much to learn from those I have been privileged enough to partner with here in Ethiopia. Inspiring people with inspirational stories will follow me home and will undoubtedly inform the way I practice as a healthcare provider in the future.”

Emily’s experience with SCOPE has inspired a fantastic personal blog called ‘Spilling Emily’ where she shares her experiences and those inspirational stories of the women and children for whom she has come to care a great deal.

You can learn more about our SCOPE program, and the work that we do here.