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Immunization

What is shingles (herpes zoster)?

Shingles, also known as herpes zoster, is a painful skin rash caused by the varicella zoster virus, the same virus that causes chickenpox.  Shingles is an illness most commonly found in persons over age 60, but can occur at any age. 


TB, or tuberculosis, is a disease caused by a bacteria named M. tuberculosis. This bacteria can infect any part of the body, but it most commonly affects the lungs. TB is spread through the air from one infected person to another.

There are two types, or stages, of TB. The first is latent, or inactive, TB. In latent TB, there are live TB bacteria inside a person, but that person is not sick. Someone with latent TB feels fine: no cough, no fever. Someone with latent TB cannot spread this infection.


NOTE: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides thorough, up-to-date information on vaccines. The Immunization Action Coalition is also a reliable resource.

Immunization No. of injections Protection period Exposure More information

Hemophilus influenza type B (HIB)

Variable Lifetime Respiratory

CDC information

Hepatitis A

2 injections 20+ years Contaminated food and water CDC information

Hepatitis B

3 injections Lifelong Blood and bodily fluids What You Need to Know About Hepatitis B (Hall Health Center)

Hepatitis A/B combination

3 injections 20+ years to lifelong Blood and bodily fluids

CDC information (A)

CDC information (B)

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) 3 injections Lifelong Skin to skin

HPV Vaccine FAQs (Hall Health Center)

All About HPV     (Hall Health Center)

Influenza 1 injection or nasal spray 1 year Respiratory virus CDC information
Japanese encephalitis 2 injections 1-2 years Mosquito CDC information
Meningococcal 1 injections 3-5 years Respiratory CDC information
Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR) combination 2 injections Lifelong Respiratory

CDC information

Polio (IPV) Childhood series + 1 injection as an adult Lifelong Contaminated food and water CDC information
Pneumococcal 1 injection or childhood series 10+ years Respiratory CDC information
Rabies 3 injections Partial protection Mammal exposure: bite, scratch CDC information
Tetanus, Diphtheria, and Pertussus combination TD or TDaP
Dtap (children)
Approximately 10 years Infected wound, respiratory CDC information
Typhoid 1 injection OR oral pills

2 years for injection;
5 years for oral tablets

Contaminated food and water CDC information
Varicella (chicken pox) 2 injections Lifelong Respiratory CDC information
Yellow Fever 1 injection 10 years Mosquito CDC information
Herpes Zoster (shingles) 1 injections Lifelong Previous chicken pox CDC information

 


Get your flu vaccine at Hall Health

flu_0.jpgThe flu vaccine is currently available in the Immunization Clinic at Hall Health Center

What is the HPV vaccine?

Two HPV vaccines (Gardasil and Cervarix) are approved to prevent cervical and other cancers.  Hall Health carries Gardasil, which prevents against the types of HPV that cause most cervical cancers.  It also protects you from the HPV strains that lead to mos


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