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Immunization

Location, contact information and hours

Phone: (206) 685-1018

General questions about immunization: hhimmune@uw.edu

Location:

Hall Health Center, Ground Floor Room G03 (west end of building)

All patients must check in at Patient Service Center on main floor.

Hours:

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday: 8AM-5PM

Tuesdays: 9AM-5PM

Directions and parking

Contact the Patient Service Center first to arrange for immunizations

While no appointment is necessary for UW students and established patients to receive immunizations from our clinic, some vaccines require an order from a doctor or a nurse. Contact the Patient Service Center by phone or in person to determine the best course of action, or you can get in touch with your Hall Health Center provider through eCare.

UW Measles Requirement

If you have questions about the UW Measles Requirement, visit this page or email measles@uw.edu.

Health Sciences Immunization Program

Health Sciences Students requiring an annual PPD and/or flu vaccine should contact myshots@uw.edu or call (206) 616-9074. The Immunization Clinic at Hall Health does not administer this program.

If you are a Health Sciences student needing a review of your immunization history to meet your program's requirements, you may contact the Patient Service Center or use your eCare account to schedule an appointment with a provider. There may be a fee for form completion. The visit is subsidized through the Student Activity Fee.

More information

Health Sciences Immunization Program

UW Measles Requirement

Travel Clinic
A Hall Health Travel Clinic consult required for travel immunizations.

Privacy Notice
UW Hall Health Center recognizes the responsibility for safeguarding private health information.
Please follow link above for information regarding use and disclosure of protected health information.


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Clinic hours

The Immunization Clinic is open:

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday: 8AM-5PM

Tuesdays: 9AM-5PM

Please check in at the Patient Service Center for any visit to the Immunization Clinic and then proceed to the waiting room on the ground floor of Hall Health.


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Immunizations

The Immunization Clinic offers:


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What's the big deal about meningitis?

Meningitis can be deadly, and young adults are especially vulnerable. Learn more about the disease here and visit Hall Health Center to be vaccinated.


What is shingles (herpes zoster)?

Shingles, also known as herpes zoster, is a painful skin rash caused by the varicella zoster virus, the same virus that causes chickenpox.  Shingles is an illness most commonly found in persons over age 60, but can occur at any age. 


TB, or tuberculosis, is a disease caused by a bacteria named M. tuberculosis. This bacteria can infect any part of the body, but it most commonly affects the lungs. TB is spread through the air from one infected person to another.

There are two types, or stages, of TB. The first is latent, or inactive, TB. In latent TB, there are live TB bacteria inside a person, but that person is not sick. Someone with latent TB feels fine: no cough, no fever. Someone with latent TB cannot spread this infection.


NOTE: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provides thorough, up-to-date information on vaccines. The Immunization Action Coalition is also a reliable resource.

Immunization No. of injections Protection period Exposure More information

Hemophilus influenza type B (HIB)

Variable Lifetime Respiratory

CDC information

Hepatitis A

2 injections 20+ years Contaminated food and water CDC information

Hepatitis B

3 injections Lifelong Blood and bodily fluids What You Need to Know About Hepatitis B (Hall Health Center)

Hepatitis A/B combination

3 injections 20+ years to lifelong Blood and bodily fluids

CDC information (A)

CDC information (B)

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) 3 injections Lifelong Skin to skin

HPV Vaccine FAQs (Hall Health Center)

All About HPV     (Hall Health Center)

Influenza 1 injection or nasal spray 1 year Respiratory virus CDC information
Japanese encephalitis 2 injections 1-2 years Mosquito CDC information
Meningococcal 1 injections 3-5 years Respiratory CDC information
Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR) combination 2 injections Lifelong Respiratory

CDC information

Polio (IPV) Childhood series + 1 injection as an adult Lifelong Contaminated food and water CDC information
Pneumococcal 1 injection or childhood series 10+ years Respiratory CDC information
Rabies 3 injections Partial protection Mammal exposure: bite, scratch CDC information
Tetanus, Diphtheria, and Pertussus combination TD or TDaP
Dtap (children)
Approximately 10 years Infected wound, respiratory CDC information
Typhoid 1 injection OR oral pills

2 years for injection;
5 years for oral tablets

Contaminated food and water CDC information
Varicella (chicken pox) 2 injections Lifelong Respiratory CDC information
Yellow Fever 1 injection 10 years Mosquito CDC information
Herpes Zoster (shingles) 1 injections Lifelong Previous chicken pox CDC information

 


Get your flu vaccine at Hall Health

flu_0.jpgThe flu vaccine will be available as of 9/30/2013 in the Immunization Clinic at Hall Health Center.

Hall Health Center Immunization Clinic hours:

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday: 8AM-12:30PM and 1:30PM-5PM

Tuesdays: 9AM-12:30PM and 1:30PM-5PM

No appointment is needed, but check in is required at the Patient Service Center on the first floor.

Payment options

Health insurance will be billed directly. To determine if services at Hall Health Center are covered under your insurance plan, visit our insurance information page.

Flu vaccine information

  • The flu vaccine is recommended for anyone 6 months and older
  • 2013-2014 flu vaccine strains include H1N1 and H3N2
  • Patients 2–49 years of age may get nasal mist (Flumist™) if all criteria are met;
    Refer to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website for more information
  • Patients 6 months and older may get injectable flu vaccine
  • Pregnant women should get a preservative-free dose, if available

Additional resources

CDC's influenza page

Washington State Department of Health influenza information

CDC's information on self-care when you have the flu


What is the HPV vaccine?

Two HPV vaccines (Gardasil and Cervarix) are approved to prevent cervical and other cancers.  Hall Health carries Gardasil, which prevents against the types of HPV that cause most cervical cancers.  It also protects you from the HPV strains that lead to mos


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