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Mental Health

couple talking and sitting close togetherFirst-year students (and their parents!) usually have expectations about college life long before actually leaving home. Some students look forward to college, and are eager to experience more freedom and adventure, while others may feel enthusiastic initially, only to discover that they don't feel happy, comfortable, or secure in their new environment.


couple in breakup modeThe end of a relationship is one of the more painful and stressful things people experience. As a culture, we have no clear-cut rituals for ending relationships or saying goodbye to significant others. We are often unprepared for the feelings we experience in the process. Sometimes, the emotions that come up after a breakup can catch us off-guard and affect our functioning at school, work, and in other relationships. 


christmas holiday candlesSeven steps to a great holiday break

Starting to feel anxious about "going home" or being around family for the holidays? Here are seven tips to help you make the most of the season and enjoy the break from academic pressures.


friends talkingApproaching an individual with a personal health-related issue is a process often involving many elements including engaging in dialogue, educating yourself and your friend, and exploring resources, with the eventual goal of them seeking additional help from a health care professional. 


What is anger?

Anger is a common, normal, healthy emotion felt by most people.  It can range from mild irritation or annoyance to full-blown rage or physical violence.


photo of young man

What is ADD/ADHD?

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, also known as ADHD, is a condition that makes it difficult for people to control their attention and behavior. It usually appears before age seven. ADHD symptoms may create difficulties getting work done. Symptoms may also affect relationships with friends and family.

It is common to have a hard time focusing on schoolwork sometimes, or to occasionally be impulsive in decision making. These symptoms by themselves do not mean that you have ADHD. 

What are the signs and symptoms of ADHD?

Although symptoms of the disorder vary by individual and can range from mild to severe, some of the most common signs are:

  • Difficulty focusing in a variety of situations
  • Problems getting organized
  • Not listening when spoken to
  • Having trouble sitting still or waiting in line
  • Constantly interrupting others

Other behaviors related to ADHD are chronic lateness and forgetfulness, anxiety, difficulty organizing, difficulty controlling anger, impulsiveness, and substance abuse.

People with ADHD are easily distracted by sights and sounds in their environment, cannot concentrate for long periods of time, are often restless, have a tendency to daydream, and may be slow to complete tasks.

Who is affected by ADHD?

Studies show that men are twice as likely as women to be diagnosed with ADHD, and that between 2 and 6% of the adult population has the disorder. At least one student in every classroom in the United States has been diagnosed with ADHD.

How can I tell if I have ADHD?

ADHD should only be diagnosed by an experienced and qualified professional such as an educational psychologist or a psychiatrist. Since the symptoms of ADHD are common to may other conditions, you should never self-diagnose. Instead, seek a comprehensive evaluation from a qualified professional. A comprehensive evaluation may include exploring personal and family medical history, and psychological testing.  Hall Health is unable to perform ADD/ADHD evaluations.  If you are in need of an evaluation, please see our page on ADD/ADHD Testing and Medication Resources.

Additional information

More information about ADHD can be found at:

Authored by: Hall Health Mental Health Clinic

Reviewed by: Hall Health Mental Health Clinic and Hall Health Primary Care Clinic (GLC), April 2014


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