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Primary Care

woman reading a nutrition labelUnderstanding the information on a nutrition label can often be a confusing task. This is unfortunate as the provided information can aid you in choosing the right foods needed to live a healthy life.

Nutritional labels are composed of five sections:


photo of young Asian woman selecting produce from a fridgeAlthough ads for products promising rapid weight loss are everywhere, most of these products do not deliver their promises. Any immediate weight loss is often regained in a number of weeks because it was not sustainable weight loss.  Good nutrition and regular exercise are proven ways to stay at a healthy weight. 


diabetes finger testAlmost everyone knows someone who has diabetes. An estimated 26 million people in the United States—8 percent of the population—have diabetes, a serious, lifelong condition. Of those, about 19 million have been diagnosed, and 7 million have not yet been diagnosed. In 2010, about 1.9 million people aged 20 or older were diagnosed with diabetes.


When a baby's on the way, moms-to-be are often overwhelmed by advice and warnings from family, friends and even strangers.  But perhaps the most important advice is to stay as healthy as possible before and during your pregnancy. photo of pregant (belly) woman


Why primary care providers?

Primary care providers (or PCPs) are those physicians and Nurse Practitioners who deliver comprehensive health care in the clinic setting. This means they take care of a wide variety of problems--acute medical illnesses such as common colds, sinus infections, stomach problems, and skin rashes, for example, but also more chronic health problems like acne, depression, asthma, high blood pressure, and allergies.


TB, or tuberculosis, is a disease caused by a bacteria named M. tuberculosis. This bacteria can infect any part of the body, but it most commonly affects the lungs. TB is spread through the air from one infected person to another.

There are two types, or stages, of TB. The first is latent, or inactive, TB. In latent TB, there are live TB bacteria inside a person, but that person is not sick. Someone with latent TB feels fine: no cough, no fever. Someone with latent TB cannot spread this infection.


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