The Department of History

News Spotlight

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Turning from the 2015 Lecture Series’ focus on the First World War, the 2016 History Lecture Series looked to the University’s immediate environs: Seattle. Drs. John Findlay, Quintard Taylor, Linda Nash, and James Gregory examined Seattle’s history through the lens of political, environmental, demographic, and radical history. Ranging from an introduction to the origins of Seattle’s founders to an examination of Seattle’s incredible growth, from its relatively homogenous early years to its increasingly diverse modern makeup, “Excavating Seattle’s Histories: People, Politics, Place” offered new perspectives on Seattle’s history. The Series challenged assumptions on what makes Seattle the city it is today and pointed to the many different possible futures. To watch videos of this year’s lectures, follow the link: History Lecture Series 2016.

Featured Story

The History Community was saddened to hear of the passing of former Graduate student Chris Grorud, who passed away January 24, 2016 in Jakarta, Indonesia. Chris studied Indonesian history and politics and was passionate about working with the people of Indonesia, doing field research in history and with the Jackson School of International Studies’ Southeast Asia Center. Chris’ family has established an endowed memorial fund in Chris’ name to support students of Southeast Asian history. To donate to the fund, please follow the link Christian Grorud Endowed Memorial Fund. To read Chris’ obituary, follow the link Chris Grorud Obituary.

Faculty Book Corner

Touted as the "Jerusalem of the Balkans," the Mediterranean port city of Salonica (Thessaloniki) was once home to the largest Sephardic Jewish community in the world. The collapse of the Ottoman Empire and the city's incorporation into Greece in 1912 provoked a major upheaval that compelled Salonica's Jews to reimagine their community and status as citizens of a nation-state. Jewish Salonica is the first book to tell the story of this tumultuous transition through the voices and perspectives of Salonican Jews as they forged a new place for themselves in Greek society.