The Department of History

News Spotlight

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Turning from the 2015 Lecture Series’ focus on the First World War, the 2016 History Lecture Series looked to the University’s immediate environs: Seattle. Drs. John Findlay, Quintard Taylor, Linda Nash, and James Gregory examined Seattle’s history through the lens of political, environmental, demographic, and radical history. Ranging from an introduction to the origins of Seattle’s founders to an examination of Seattle’s incredible growth, from its relatively homogenous early years to its increasingly diverse modern makeup, “Excavating Seattle’s Histories: People, Politics, Place” offered new perspectives on Seattle’s history. The Series challenged assumptions on what makes Seattle the city it is today and pointed to the many different possible futures. To watch videos of this year’s lectures, follow the link: History Lecture Series 2016.

Featured Story

Graduate students Eric Johnson and Sarah Zaides have been named 2016 Fellows for the Joff Hanauer Endowment for Excellence in Western Civilization. Eric Johnson is a PhD Candidate in Russian History, specializing in the urban history of nineteenth-century Kazan. Sarah Zaides is a PhD Candidate in Russian and Jewish History, whose work focuses on nineteenth and twentieth-century Jewish refugees in the Ottoman Empire. Fellows participate in a bi-monthly seminar on issues related broadly to Western Civilization along with students from other disciplines. The aim of the program is to facilitate interdisciplinary work in both research and teaching within the humanities. Congratulations to Eric and Sarah!

Faculty Book Corner

Though best known for aircraft and aerospace technology, Boeing has invested significant time and money in the construction and promotion of its corporate culture. Boeing’s leaders, in keeping with the standard of traditional American social norms, began to promote a workplace culture of a white, heterosexual family model in the 1930s in an attempt to provide a sense of stability for their labor force during a series of enormous political, social, and economic disruptions. For both managers and workers, the construction of a masculine culture solved problems that technological innovation and profit could not. For managers it offered a way to govern employees and check the power of unions. For male employees, it offered a sense of stability that higher wages and the uncertainties of the airline market could not.