The Department of History

News Spotlight

The department is pleased to announce that Professor Linda Nash recently received a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities for research on her new project, "American Engineers and Hydroelectric Development Projects in the US and Afghanistan." With the help of this funding, Nash seeks to examine how Americans’ approach to postwar development was shaped by the nation’s abundant resources and its history of settler colonialism in the American West.

More details are available at the Simpson Center.

Congratulations Linda!

 

Featured Story

So just what is the point in getting a history degree? Amanda Morse faced this question for herself in 2009. Following a lifelong interest in Latin and the classical era, Morse had entered UW in 2005 seeking a history degree, with an emphasis on ancient Greece and Rome. Now, four years later, she was only a few credits short of graduation, but found herself dismayed at the challenging prospect of building a career as a historian of antiquity. Wondering whether it had all been for nothing, Morse dropped out of school to take stock of her talents and contemplate her future.

Faculty Book Corner

Serious and silly, unifying and polarizing, presidential elections have become events that Americans love and hate. Today's elections cost billions of dollars and consume the nation's attention for months, filling television airwaves and online media with endless advertising and political punditry, often heated, vitriolic, and petty. Yet presidential elections also provoke and inspire mass engagement of ordinary citizens in the political system. No matter how frustrated or disinterested voters might be about politics and government, every four years, on the first Tuesday in November, the attention of the nation—and the world—focuses on the candidates, the contest, and the issues. The partisan election process has been a way for a messy, jumbled, raucous nation to come together as a slightly-more-perfect union.