The Department of History

News Spotlight

UW History alumna Turkiya Lowe was recently named Chief Historian of the National Park Service. Lowe received her Ph.D. from the department in 2010, with particular focus on the fields of African American History, Twentieth-Century US History, and Women’s History. Previously, she served in a variety of roles in the National Park Service, both during and after her graduate studies--most recently as Chief Historian of the service’s Southeast Region, and before that in other positions in the Southeast Region, the Pacific West Region, and the Washington DC Support Office. She has also been a contributor to the award-winning UW-connected website on African American history, BlackPast.org.

Featured Story

At 21 years old, Rayna Mathis, a recent graduate from the Department of History, is off to a fantastic start in her career. She graduated in the Spring of 2016 at just 20 years old, having already launched her career as a museum professional. Rayna currently works as Coordinator for School and Educator Programs at the Seattle Art Museum (SAM), a position she has held since May of 2016.

Faculty Book Corner

For the Makahs, a tribal nation at the most northwestern point of the contiguous United States, a deep relationship with the sea is the locus of personal and group identity. Unlike most other indigenous tribes whose lives are tied to lands, the Makah people have long placed marine space at the center of their culture, finding in their own waters the physical and spiritual resources to support themselves. This book is the first to explore the history and identity of the Makahs from the arrival of maritime fur-traders in the eighteenth century through the intervening centuries and to the present day.