Raymond Jonas: Areas of Graduate Study

Division: Europe--Medieval to Modern Times

Europe and the Modern World: This field aims to provide a familiarity with some of the great themes, problems, and events in the history of modern Europe, including but not limited to Europe’s larger global engagements. It offers a foundation for advanced study of a thematic or regional nature, a basis for comparative historical study within Europe and beyond, and preparation for the teaching of entry-level and advanced undergraduate surveys in the field.  

Students preparing Europe and the Modern World as a graduate field  should take the graduate field course (HSTEU 513) and at least one other graduate level course under my supervision.

Modern France: This field aims to provide a serviceable familiarity with the history of France from the Revolution of 1789 to the present.  For much of the period--at least until 1945--France was regarded not only as a great power, but as the hub of global modernity in such diverse domains as architecture, art, political culture, philosophy, science, and fashion.  An understanding of French politics and culture in these years is fundamental to the study of modern Europe and much of the world.

France was home to claims of universal human rights; it was also, paradoxically, the home to a global empire, touching Africa, Asia, and the Americas.  Thus, the French field serves as a foundation for advanced study of one of the great national histories of continental Europe, but it also serves as the basis for comparative historical study within Europe and beyond.

Students preparing Modern France as a graduate field should take the graduate field course (HSTEU 521) and at least one other graduate level course under my supervision.

 

GRADUATE COURSES TAUGHT

Autumn 2015

HSTRY 590 (Special Topics): Wars of Conquest, Wars of Insurgency, Wars of Memory

This course focuses on one of the more dramatic forms of aggression--the war of conquest--and places it within the broader contexts of war, society, race, and nation. We take up case studies drawn from Europe, Africa, the Middle East, and the Americas in order to explore such themes as evangelical war, revolutionary war, wars of pacification, wars of empire, and wars of insurgency. We take particular interest in partisan warfare, the tradition of guerrilla, and the place of the partisan, the collaborator, and the insurgent. We pursue the collapse of the distinction between combatant and non-combatant, a distinction that is often also a gendered boundary. Finally, we look at the aftermaths of war, exploring the deployment and counter-deployment of memory in local and remote contexts. We use a mix of secondary and primary sources to facilitate discussions about research and teaching.

Case studies contemplated include the Vendee (1793-1795), Egypt (1798), Spain (1808-1813), the Confederate Insurgency (1860-1865), Mexico (1840s-1860s), Ethiopia, German Southwest Africa, Algeria, Palestine.

 

Winter 2015

HSTEU 521: Field Course in Modern France (3-6 credits; max. 6)

A reading course in the history of France in the modern period.  Topics vary from year to year according to such considerations as the timeliness of certain topics, expressed student interest, the publication of significant new work, and the visit of specialist scholars to campus.  Prospective students should contact the instructor as soon as possible if the student wishes to see particular topics represented in the syllabus.  Topics for this year include: the historiography of the French Revolution; the Egyptian campaign and French empire; the urban landscape.

HSTEU 521 and field preparation--this course may be taken as preparation for either of the following fields: Modern France, Europe and the Modern World.

Graduate students from related disciplines are encouraged to enroll.

Reading knowledge of French not required.

Class assignments: In addition to completing reading assignments and preparing for discussion, student responsibilities include two or three seminar presentations and three historiographical essays.  Variable credit is available at the student's option; however, only the number of written assignments will be reduced for students enrolling for fewer than five credits.

 

Autumn 2014

HSTEU 513: Europe and the Modern World

This course concerns the history of Europe and its global engagements in the modern period. The field aims to provide a familiarity with some of the great themes, problems, and events in the history of modern Europe including, but not limited to, Europe's larger global engagements. It offers a foundation for advanced study of a thematic or regional nature, a basis for comparative historical study within Europe and beyond, and preparation for the teaching of entry-level and advanced undergraduate surveys in the field.

The syllabus begins with the Revolution of 1789 and the crisis of the European old regime and takes up select topics through the 19th and 20th centuries, incorporating primary and secondary sources. Students interested in taking HSTEU 513 should contact Professor Jonas right away; it is possible to adjust the syllabus to accommodate the interests of seminar participants.