Susan Glenn: Areas of Graduate Study

Division: United States History

Students may emphasize the cultural and/or social history of the U.S. in the long twentieth century (since the l870s). Topics of study include immigration and ethnic group life, social and political movements, women and gender, race relations, expressive and popular culture.

Division: Comparative History (Comparative Gender & Comparative Ethnicity & Nationalism)*

A field in comparative gender with Professor Glenn will emphasize the history and historiography of gender and women's history. Areas of study include the relationship between gender and race, ethnicity, nationalism, class, and social movements as well as the significance of gender ideology in the production and consumption of expressive and popular culture. Comparisons will focus on the U.S. and another geographic area (in conjunction with another faculty member).

Students may also work with Professor Glenn on a sub-field of Comparative Ethnicity and Nationalism with a focus on Jewish history/identity/ethnicity; Jews, Blacks, and the racial imaginary in the American and European contexts.

*Students may not offer a field in the Comparative History division as a first field.

 

GRADUATE COURSES TAUGHT

Autumn 2014

HSTAA 532: Research Seminar in Recent US History, Part 1 of 2

This is a two-quarter research seminar for U.S. history graduate students. Each member of the seminar will be expected to produce an original research paper that has the potential to become a publishable article. These papers (in the range from 35-45 double-spaced pages) must be based on primary sources and actively engaged with significant debates in the scholarly literature. For some the paper will provide an entrée into a new area of intellectual inquiry or a new way of understanding and approaching a topic of long-standing interest to the student. More advanced students are encouraged to see this paper as an opportunity to launch a dissertation project. All seminar participants will be required to seek guidance from a faculty member whose own research is closely related to their topic.

Approximately 80 percent of the course grade will be based on the final paper, which is due at the end of the winter quarter. The other 20 percent will be based on seminar participation and short writing assignments. Students will receive a grade of “N” (“no grade now”) at the end of the autumn quarter, provided that their work is of passing quality. After submitting a final paper at the end of winter quarter, a grade will be given for both quarters of work (for a total of 12 units). We will meet most weeks during the autumn quarter, but less frequently during the winter quarter when final drafts are due.