Stories Archive

New Course on American Citizenship Examines the Narrative of “Equal Rights for All” in U.S. History

In Autumn 2014 the Department of History will offer a new course in American history – HSTAA 110 American Citizenship. Designed and taught by Professor John M. Findlay, this course presents a clear, thematic focus on citizenship – an issue that is of enduring interest and importance today -- that supplements the department's introductory survey course in United States history.

Graduate Student Profile: Eleanor Mahoney

History PhD Candidate Eleanor Mahoney

Eleanor Mahoney is a PhD Candidate in the History Department. Her dissertation examines changes in American land use patterns from roughly the Great Society to the election of Ronald Reagan. In particular, Mahoney traces connections between the rise of environmentalism in the 1970’s and the decline of industry – linkages frequently ignored in scholarly and popular histories of the period.

Graduate Student Profile: Antony Adler

History PhD Candidate Antony Adler

Antony Adler is a doctoral candidate in the History of Science. His dissertation project, The Ocean Laboratory: Exploration, Fieldwork, and Science at Sea, presents a comprehensive transnational history of the changing practices of scientific oceanic fieldwork from the late eighteenth century to the early twentieth century using British, French, and American case studies.

Prof. Susan Glenn Explores the Boundaries of Jewish Identity

University of Washington History Professor Susan Glenn presented the annual David Belin Memorial Lecture in Jewish Public Affairs at the University of Michigan in March, where she spoke about “The Jewish Cold War: Anxiety and Identity in the Aftermath of the Holocaust.” Concurrently, a profile of Professor Glenn was featured in the March 2014 issue of the Washtenaw Jewish News  in which she discussed her own Jewish identity.

Reviving the Language and Culture of Sephardic Jews

Professor Devin Naar of the Department of History was recently interviewed for a feature article in the March 2014 edition of Columns: The University of Washington Alumni Magazine. There, he describes his own journey which began when he came into possession of a stack of old letters from relatives who had lived in Greece during the Second World War and were murdered during the Holocaust. It was the process of decyphering these letters--written in Ladino, the centuries-old Judeo-Spanish language of the Sephardic Jews--that set Naar on the path that would later lead him to his present task, leading a project dedicated to keeping the Sephardic language and culture alive.

Research by UW History Students Helps Shape Exhibit on Seattle's Historic Wooden Fishing Boats

Photo credit: Abby Inpanbutr

A new exhibit at the Center for Wooden Boats in Seattle's South Lake Union neighborhood, features research conducted by UW History students. Undergraduate history majors Letha Penhale and Victor Aque and history PhD student Ross Coen all contributed to the exhibit “Highliners: Boats of the Century,” which tells the history of Seattle's century-old fleet of wooden fishing boats. Their research, conducted under the guidance of Department of History Professor Bruce Hevly, who specialized in the history of science and technology, "explored technological changes that have kept the old boats viable, the social history of those who built and operated the vessels and how the fleet and related activities helped shape Northwest coastal communities" (Seattle Times).  Some ships featured in the exhibit were built as long ago as 1913 and continue to participate in the Alaskan fishing season to this day. Thus the work of these history students not only explains the role of these fishing boats in Seattle history, but helps exhibit visitors learn how fishing continues to play a part in Seattle's present.

New Course on the History of Global Health

Using a course development grant from the Department of History, Professor Adam Warren has crafted a new undergraduate course that is of value not only to students of the past, but also to those training to shape the future of global health. Part of the University of Washington’s new Minor in Global Health, this course considers how a historical approach may help experts address complex political and ethical concerns within the global health movement.

The course has proven so popular, with both history and science majors, that Professor Warren plans to teach it again in Autumn 2014.

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