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Keywords: Reviews

Garden Tool:

"Emily Dickinson's Herbarium" is a full-size, facsimile of an album of pressed flowers, leaves, and other plant parts created in the 1840s when Dickinson was a student at Amherst Academy. There is no stated purpose or obvious order to this collection, which includes both native plants of western Massachusetts and specimens that could only come from a garden or conservatory. As a traditional herbarium the value is limited, as none of the important collection information (date, exact location, etc.) are recorded.

Over 400 specimens survive, some accurately labeled by the author using botanical guides of the day, others with descriptive if incorrect Latin binomials (for example, Petunia alba for a white petunia). Others have lost their labels. The Harvard University Herbaria staff has identified nearly all despite numerous challenges. A detailed catalog records all this detective work.

But the value of this book is not as a traditional herbarium. I see it as a piece of history, and of an early glimpse of the life of one of our country's most valued poets. And, if you've ever attempted your own collection of pressed plants, you will appreciate the considerable effort taken not only to produce this book, but also to preserve it for over 160 years.

Accompanying essays document the herbarium's conservation, the history of the family battles over Dickinson's legacy, and securing the Dickinson collection for Harvard. Best is the article by Richard B. Sewall, "Science and the Poet: Emily Dickinson's Herbarium and 'The Clue Divine,'" in which he begins, "Take Emily's Herbarium far enough, and you have her." Perhaps. In any case, he argues for the close connection she found between science and art -- an argument that could be equally well applied to William Bartram.

"Emily Dickinson's Herbarium," because of its size, cannot be checked out, but is available to all to study and view in the Miller Library.

Reviewed by Curator of Horticultural Literature, Brian Thompson. Excerpted from the Summer 2008 Arboretum Bulletin.

Season: All Season
Date: 2013-07-24
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Keywords: Reviews

Garden Tool: "The Wild Within" "The Wild Within" is a photo collection highlighting the wetlands -- with a special emphasis on the animals of the Washington Park Arboretum. It is a real page-turner, but pages that you'll return to and savor frequently with an even deeper appreciation of the value of our Arboretum.

Essays provide occasional breaks in the photographs and they are well worth reading. Notables Dale Chihully, Dan Evans, Peter Steinbrueck, William Ruckelshaus and others shed their public faces to give very personal accounts of the importance of the Arboretum.

Reviewed by Curator of Horticultural Literature, Brian Thompson. Excerpted from the Fall 2008 Arboretum Bulletin.

Season: All Season
Date: 2013-07-24
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Keywords: Reviews

Garden Tool: "The Last Oasis," by Seattle Times photographer Tom Reese extends a bit beyond the Arboretum in its scope, including human subjects and their impact, some of it benign but much that's troubling. However the message is much the same -- these urban wetlands are a treasure that is critical to preserve.

Reviewed by Curator of Horticultural Literature, Brian Thompson. Excerpted from the Fall 2008 Arboretum Bulletin.

Season: All Season
Date: 2013-07-24
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Keywords: Reviews

Garden Tool:

For gardeners, the most important new book of the year will be the "Encyclopedia of Northwest Native Plants for Gardens and Landscapes." A trio of southwest Washington writers brings extensive experience in botany, propagating and growing native plants, and photography together in this very comprehensive and extensive book that will be a standard reference for many years to come.

A brief introduction lays the ground rules: only natives -- nothing naturalized since the arrival of "non-indigenous human explorers". Plants that are rare and nearly impossible to grow in cultivation are out, too. An example being the various lovely but sensitive slipper orchids.

There are some seeming exceptions to this last rule, such as Erythronium montanum, the stunning but notoriously difficult-to-cultivate avalanche lily seen at Hurricane Ridge. However, the authors note, it can be grown by gardeners who live at higher elevations.

The heart of the book is a listing of over 500 species that gives a basic description, cultivation requirements, native range and habitat, plus notes about related species, ethnobotany and selected varieties. Propagation tips are included, with a strong emphasis on conservation of plants in situ.

The excellent photographs make this a pretty good identification book, too, and will convince you to add more natives to your home garden, including ferns, shrubs, and trees, both broad leaf and conifers. The appendices include helpful lists of plants to meet various gardening needs (for shade, for wildflower meadows, for hummingbirds, etc.). This book is a must have!

Reviewed by Curator of Horticultural Literature, Brian Thompson. Excerpted from the Fall 2008 Arboretum Bulletin.

Season: All Season
Date: 2013-07-24
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Keywords: Reviews

Garden Tool: For the serious student of native plants, "The Flora of Mount Adams, Washington" will be an important work. Considered to be the most diverse flora in the state, Mt. Adams hosts several, quite distinct habitats and over 800 distinct species of plants. As there are no photographs and only botanist-oriented descriptions and identifying keys, this is not for the casual seeker of wildflowers. Instead, look for co-author Susan McDougall's "The Wildflowers of Mount Adams, Washington."

Reviewed by Curator of Horticultural Literature, Brian Thompson. Excerpted from the Fall 2008 Arboretum Bulletin.

Season: All Season
Date: 2013-07-24
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Keywords: Reviews

Garden Tool: Excellent photographs are the outstanding quality of "Uncommon Beauty," a new field guide focused on an underexplored part of the Pacific Northwest -- southeastern British Columbia. Written by an enthusiastic outdoorsman and native of the area, Neil L. Jennings provides a very readable description of over 200 plants, many who have ranges that extend southward into eastern Washington.

Reviewed by Curator of Horticultural Literature, Brian Thompson. Excerpted from the Fall 2008 Arboretum Bulletin.

Season: All Season
Date: 2013-07-24
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Keywords: Reviews

Garden Tool: Steve Whysall has been a regular garden writer for the Vancouver Sun for 15 years. "Best Plant Picks" selects trees, shrubs, perennials, bulbs, and ferns from his more recent columns and organizes them in a gardening calendar, including tips on monthly chores and seasonal highlights. While not a major departure for the author's earlier books, there are some interesting juxtapositions here. A good choice for a new gardener who is willing to experiment.

Reviewed by Curator of Horticultural Literature, Brian Thompson. Excerpted from the Fall 2008 Arboretum Bulletin.

Season: All Season
Date: 2013-07-24
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Keywords: Reviews

Garden Tool: Based on his earlier, high-energy books, it is not hard to imagine Des Kennedy as the author of book entitled "The Passionate Gardener." With wicked humor and incredible insight to both gardens and gardeners, he warns of the seven deadly sins of gardening, and extols its ten commandments. Other chapters are more reflective, but he's always ready to see the irony and contradictions in how we conduct our favorite pursuit.

Kennedy also displays a knack for travel writing, making trips to Hawaii, Ireland, and New Zealand entertaining while packing in a lot of names and facts that would be handy for planning your own trip. This is the perfect reading companion for a winter's evening and between the laughs, you just might soak up some good, sound gardening counsel based the author's years of gardening in the British Columbia Gulf Islands.

Reviewed by Curator of Horticultural Literature, Brian Thompson. Excerpted from the Fall 2008 Arboretum Bulletin.

Season: All Season
Date: 2013-07-24
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Keywords: Reviews

Garden Tool: Straddling the US/Canadian border are the publications of Lone Pine, with authors from both sides. Three recent titles -- "Water Garden Plants" , "Container Gardening," and "Herb Gardening" -- are each addressed to Washington and Oregon but certainly are applicable further north, too. These are very useful titles for beginners, with the Lone Pine trademark water-resistant covers and easy, travel guide style presentation. Stock up for the new gardeners you know.

Reviewed by Curator of Horticultural Literature, Brian Thompson. Excerpted from the Fall 2008 Arboretum Bulletin.

Season: All Season
Date: 2013-08-14
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Keywords: Reviews

Garden Tool:

One of the most unique new additions to the Elisabeth C. Miller Library collections is "Holden Village Historic Iris," the accounting of the surviving garden iris from the village of a mining camp that operated near the upper end of Lake Chelan from 1937 - 1957. Now established at a nearby Lutheran ministry known as Holden Village, these irises are a living history. Grown by the wives of the miners, many survived untended for more than 40 years in abandoned gardens.

Newer varieties were added after the village was established in the early 1960's, but like the older varieties, the "real" names are mostly unknown. Instead, authors Roxanne Grinstad and Larry Howard (the latter a garden volunteer at the Center for Urban Horticulture) share the local names that reflect the flowers' place in the community, evocative of both the present day and the history of the area.

Reviewed by Curator of Horticultural Literature, Brian Thompson. Excerpted from the Fall 2008 Arboretum Bulletin.

Season: All Season
Date: 2013-08-14
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Keywords: Reviews

Garden Tool: Arthur Lee Jacobson's "Wild Plants of Greater Seattle" was received with great excitement when published by the author in 2001. In the second edition, the author has added 15 new plants to the illustrated field guide, plus more than 100 to the annotated checklist, and corrected or updated much of the nomenclature throughout.

Reviewed by Curator of Horticultural Literature, Brian Thompson. Excerpted from the Fall 2008 Arboretum Bulletin.

Season: All Season
Date: 2013-08-14
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Keywords: Reviews

Garden Tool: An important contributor to our Pacific Northwest literature has been Steve Solomon, now with his 6th edition of "Growing Vegetables West of the Cascades." Each edition reflects the author's on-going learning in his craft, the major change in this edition concerns the cultivation of asparagus. He now advocates growing these from seed, rather than starting with root crowns.

Reviewed by Curator of Horticultural Literature, Brian Thompson. Excerpted from the Fall 2008 Arboretum Bulletin.

Season: All Season
Date: 2013-08-14
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Keywords: Reviews

Garden Tool: Ann Lovejoy has updated her popular 2004 "Handbook of Northwest Gardening," with a new appendix entitled "What's New in Sustainable Gardening." Here she discusses rain gardens (that capture as much of naturally occurring water as possible), dry gardens (plantings that survive and even thrive with no supplemental watering once established), and the importance of bees and their current peril -- and ways that gardeners can help their cause. All good additions.

Reviewed by Curator of Horticultural Literature, Brian Thompson. Excerpted from the Fall 2008 Arboretum Bulletin.

Season: All Season
Date: 2013-08-14
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Keywords: Reviews

Garden Tool:

John Charles Olmsted made numerous visits to the Pacific Northwest from 1903-1911. This nephew of Frederick Law Olmsted was himself a highly regarded landscape architect and noted for his attention to fine detail. The chronicle of his many projects in the region is written with this same, careful attention to detail by Joan Hockaday in "Greenscapes: Olmsted's Pacific Northwest."

Olmsted was a prolific writer, both in his professional records and in his correspondence (5,000 private letters survive), especially his daily letters to his wife Sophia and their daughters at home in Brookline, Massachusetts. Hockaday uses this wealth of sources to create a book that works on several levels: as a history of a important time in the development of our region, as a biography of a skilled landscape architect working in the shadow of his more famous uncle, and as a glimpse of a by-gone era through garden design.

While his work took him from Vancouver Island to the University of Idaho and south to Corvallis, much the book's focus is on Seattle, where he spent some 300 days during those nine years. Hockaday convincingly argues that Olmsted is responsible for much of what now defines the city, especially with the park system, Lake Washington Boulevard, the University of Washington campus (including Rainier Vista), and many private residences.

Reviewed by Curator of Horticultural Literature, Brian Thompson. Excerpted from the Fall 2009 Arboretum Bulletin.

Season: All Season
Date: 2013-08-14
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Keywords: Reviews

Garden Tool:

Portlander nurseryman Sean Hogan addresses a neglected part of the garden palette in "Trees for All Seasons: Broadleaved Evergreens for Temperate Climates". And he does it with great enthusiasm; being quite candid that one of his goals is increased planting of these excellent but underused plants.

First, he defines his scope. Conifers, or monocots such as palms, are not included. He's also strict about evergreen, subjects must "...keep their leaves year-round, or nearly so, but also remain attractive while doing so." Icons with each entry give size and shape, and emphasize these are trees, not shrubs (he's saving those for his next book).

The typical A-Z encyclopedia -- with some bunching of closely related genera -- is written for horticulturists (not botanists!) in temperate zones, and gives considerable gradation to the cold-hardiness and other exacting, cultural needs. For example, I learned that a favorite tree of mine from trips to the southwest, the Texas mountain laurel (Sophora secundiflora) would "...experience imperceptibly slow growth, or even lose ground..." in my Seattle garden without heroic efforts to match its preferred "swamp-cooler" climate.

Always the nurseryman, Hogan gives detailed notes about propagation and the habits of young nursery stock, always written in an easy to understand manner. Need to propagate your olive? Historically this was done by "chopping the heavily burled bases into pieces, pulling chunks out of the ground, then dragging them to the next area where, eventually, an olive tree would grow." He goes on to say that with less effort similar results can be obtained from well-ripened cuttings with a high...ish level of hormone...along with a steep wound."

This book will certainly enhance your appreciation of the Arboretum's collection of broadleaved evergreens.

Reviewed by Curator of Horticultural Literature, Brian Thompson. Excerpted from the Fall 2009 Arboretum Bulletin.

Season: All Season
Date: 2013-08-14
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Keywords: Reviews

Garden Tool:

Lorene Edwards Forkner tackled a huge task. She took the 900 plus pages of the late Carla Emery's "The Encyclopedia of Country Living" and distilled out of this sometimes wandering magnum opus (in 10 editions over 35 years) the essentials of vegetable gardening.

The resulting "Growing Your Own Vegetables" is a well organized and very readable work (at a comparatively slim 179 pages) that still captures the enthusiasm and down-to-earth charm of the original. While the authors both have Pacific Northwest roots, this book is written for a general audience, and so the section on okra is best skipped in planning your Seattle P-patch.

That said, there are still lots of useful and practical cultural tips. But I found it most charming in the somewhat quirky side boxes, such as that on Draft Horses and Power Tools: "Pat the animal and let it know you appreciate it after a good hard pull."

Reviewed by Curator of Horticultural Literature, Brian Thompson. Excerpted from the Fall 2009 Arboretum Bulletin.

Season: All Season
Date: 2013-08-14
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Keywords: Reviews

Garden Tool: Briefly, gardeners should read "The Weather of the Pacific Northwest" by Cliff Mass, as the local weather is our constant companion. While this doesn't specifically address the concerns of gardeners, it will help you make sense of forecasts and appreciate the unpredictability of our weather.

Reviewed by Curator of Horticultural Literature, Brian Thompson. Excerpted from the Fall 2009 Arboretum Bulletin.

Season: All Season
Date: 2013-08-14
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Keywords: Reviews

Garden Tool: In the "Timber Press Guide to Gardening in the Pacific Northwest," Carol and Norman Hall give considerable detail and nuance specific to weather, climate, and other local factors impacting gardens west of the Cascades.

Reviewed by Curator of Horticultural Literature, Brian Thompson. Excerpted from the Fall 2009 Arboretum Bulletin.

Season: All Season
Date: 2013-08-14
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Keywords: Reviews

Garden Tool: "The Northwest Green Home Primer" is a helpful book for planning your garden. While the emphasis is on the home, a chapter entitled "Site Choices" has good advice for the surrounding landscaping, especially how and where to plant trees, and briefly addresses other green practices such as rain gardens to maximize the use of runoff.

Reviewed by Curator of Horticultural Literature, Brian Thompson. Excerpted from the Fall 2009 Arboretum Bulletin.

Season: All Season
Date: 2013-08-14
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Keywords: Reviews

Garden Tool: As a resident of Montreal, Linda Rutenberg does not qualify as a Pacific Northwest author, but the collection of her photographs in the 2007 publication "The Garden at Night: Private Views of Public Eden" includes PNW subjects. The Washington Park Arboretum and the Butchart Gardens are both featured, as are several other west coast gardens. The Italian Garden at Butchart is particularly enchanting at night, and one simply must experience Azalea Way -- after dark!

Reviewed by Curator of Horticultural Literature, Brian Thompson. Excerpted from the Fall 2009 Arboretum Bulletin.

Season: All Season
Date: 2013-08-14
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Keywords: Children's programs, Environmental education

Garden Tool:

book jacket Nature Preschools and Forest Kindergartens: The Handbook for Outdoor Learning by David Sobel et al. (Redleaf Press, 2016)

Reading David Sobel's latest book feels like attending a national conference on outdoor early childhood education. Each chapter draws on the expertise and experience of key decision-makers working with young children in nature programs all over the country. The format also gives a sense of history and progress over time, with Sobel's journal entries from his work in outdoor education in the 1970s and his personal parenting journals from the 1990s presented alongside his contemporary research and observations from visits to today’s outdoor preschools.

Sobel first distinguishes forest kindergartens from nature preschools, explaining how they differ in genesis, mission, philosophy, curriculum, and focus, and how both types of programs in North America differ from the European Waldkindergarten schools which arose in the late 1960s in Germany and have influenced similar programs in Scotland and other European countries.

A central theme is the developmental case for a style of outdoor education where instructors act as mentors and guides as children experiment, choose activities and learn to work together, not only solving their own problems but deciding for themselves what questions they will ask and what games and projects to invent on the spot. These experiences, he argues, lead young children to develop initiative, perseverance and creativity as well as a richer vocabulary, a love of nature, and social skills that will serve them (and their communities) well in later life. Sobel's reasoning is persuasive and the examples he gives are diverse and fascinating.

The chapter entitled "The Dollars and Sense of Business Planning and Budgeting," contributed by Ken Finch, covers factors to consider when starting or expanding such a school. This detailed information seems particularly useful in a field that is growing quickly and likely attracts idealistic people who aren’t predisposed to draw up balance sheets and strategic plans. Whether a school is a non-profit organization or a for-profit business, it will be essential for founders to understand how to budget, how to attract staff, donors, families, and investors, and what rules and regulations affect such schools.

Sobel and his coauthors use stories, photos, and dialogue gathered from fledgling and more established nature preschools and forest kindergartens around the United States to highlight best practices in curriculum, focus, staffing, administration and funding. The book closes with a chapter by Erin K. Kenny, the cofounder and director of Cedarsong Forest Kindergarten on Vashon Island. Kenny details the events of a fall day there to illustrate some of the ways the school supports scientific inquiry, language learning, and emotional development for the children who attend. This book will intrigue anyone with an interest in outdoor education for young children.

Reviewed by Laura Blumhagen.

Season: All Season
Date: 2016-05-04
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Keywords: Reviews

Garden Tool: For an encyclopedic approach to vegetable gardening, consider the "Sunset Western Garden Book of Edibles." Like most Sunset books, this encompasses the entire west in its scope, so ignore the entry on macadamia nuts, but with the fine tuning that the Sunset zones allow, you can zero in on what will grow for you, including fruits, nuts, berries, and herbs.

Reviewed by Curator of Horticultural Literature, Brian Thompson. Excerpted from the Fall 2010 Arboretum Bulletin.

Season: All Season
Date: 2013-08-14
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Keywords: Reviews

Garden Tool:

I have long enjoyed the folksy but information packed annual catalogs from Gossler Farms Nursery in Springfield, Oregon. It is a great pleasure to now have the first book by the family (mom Marjory and sons Roger and Eric Gossler), "The Gossler Guide to the Best Hardy Shrubs." Here the very practical, learned-by-experience descriptions of the catalog are expanded to 350 of their favorites, and all would make a good choice for local gardens.

The highlight of the introductory chapters is "How Not to Kill Your Plants" with lots of advice on how to select, buy, plant, and nurture your new shrubby children. "Consider it an open adoption: you want to know about the birth parents, what neighborhood the plant came from, whether drugs were involved, and so on." This same professional insiders advice continues in the A-Z listings, where I learned that a favorite of mine, Enkianthus perulatus, is rarely found in nurseries "...because it grows too slowly to be profitable."

Reviewed by Curator of Horticultural Literature, Brian Thompson. Excerpted from the Fall 2010 Arboretum Bulletin.

Season: All Season
Date: 2013-08-14
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Keywords: Reviews

Garden Tool: Bill Terry, from the Sunshine coast of British Columbia, has filled a small book ("Blue Heaven") with an ode of praise to Meconopsis grandis, the Himalayan Blue Poppy. His cultural advice will encourage the favored few living in a climate that will nurture this hard-to-please jewel (along with some more easily managed companions like candelabra primulas and other poppies), but anyone can enjoy this display of plant passion at its highest level.

Reviewed by Curator of Horticultural Literature, Brian Thompson. Excerpted from the Fall 2010 Arboretum Bulletin.

Season: All Season
Date: 2013-08-14
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Keywords: Reviews

Garden Tool: From Oregon, Timber Press editor-in-chief Tom Fischer has created his own book, "Perennial Companions," that demonstrates 100 design combinations using herbaceous perennials and ornamental grasses. I found it best to look at the right hand, full page photographs first (almost like a flip book), then stopping at my favorites to read the interpretive material on the matching left hand page.

Reviewed by Curator of Horticultural Literature, Brian Thompson. Excerpted from the Fall 2010 Arboretum Bulletin.

Season: All Season
Date: 2013-08-14
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Keywords: Reviews

Garden Tool:

Enjoy it. These final two words of the sub-title to Valerie Easton's new book, "The NEW Low-Maintenance Garden" are the key to her message. Other low maintenance manuals treat the garden as a bothersome necessity to having a house; here the emphasis in on the joy of the garden, without it taking over your life.

Organized by broad themes, including "Design with Maintenance in Mind" and "Nature's Rhythms", Easton augments her points with interviews of an impressive list of designers, gardeners, and home owners who have created a successful outdoor space. She completes each chapter with a list of books and other resources (once a librarian...) and throughout there are oodles of tips for simplification. Best of all, she gives the type A gardener permission to relax, and to find the pleasure of it all again.

Reviewed by Curator of Horticultural Literature, Brian Thompson. Excerpted from the Fall 2010 Arboretum Bulletin.

Season: All Season
Date: 2013-08-14
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Keywords: Reviews

Garden Tool:

Linda Chalker-Scott debunks many gardening practices that don't work in "The Informed Gardener Blooms Again," a sequel to her excellent "The Informed Gardener" from 2008. The format is very similar to the first book, built around a series of short chapters with Sherlock Holmesian titles ("The Myth of the Magic Bullet", "The Myth of Nitrogen-nabbing Wood Chips") that analyze horticultural fads and home remedies from an applied, scientific perspective. After a thorough discussion of the research, a helpful summary ("The Bottom Line") follows, along with references to support her conclusions.

Chalker-Scott clearly has a passion for bringing science based, best practices to both home gardens and professional landscapes, as she has also edited and published "Sustainable Landscapes & Gardens: Good Science-Practical Application." Divided into five, separately bound units--all housed in a three-ring binder--this work has contributors from major universities throughout the Pacific Northwest.

The audience here could be either the home gardener or the professional who designs, installs, or maintains landscape plantings. The writing, while technical, is well-edited for readability for the non-academic reader and teaches not only better horticulture, but also about the research process that generates this advice. The format is designed for easily added updates and additions, so this is likely to be an important reference for our region for a long time.

Reviewed by Curator of Horticultural Literature, Brian Thompson. Excerpted from the Fall 2010 Arboretum Bulletin.

Season: All Season
Date: 2013-08-14
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Keywords: Reviews

Garden Tool: "The Climate Conscious Gardener" is the latest in the Brooklyn Botanic Garden Guides for a Greener Planet. While most of the contributing authors live in the Northeast, one of the five chapters, "Turning Your Landscape into a Carbon Sink," was written by Arboretum Foundation staff member Niall Dunne. To give an objective perspective, I'll quote from a review in HortIdeas (published by Greg and Pat Williams in Gravel Switch, Kentucky -- so no regional bias here): "Dunne's chapter alone is worth getting the book...with valuable information on numerous techniques for sequestering carbon in backyard gardens. Wouldn't it be great if amateurs throughout the U.S. could keep a really huge amount of carbon out of the atmosphere?"

Reviewed by Curator of Horticultural Literature, Brian Thompson. Excerpted from the Fall 2010 Arboretum Bulletin.

Season: All Season
Date: 2013-08-14
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Keywords: Reviews

Garden Tool: "Greening Cities, Growing Communities" is a case study of community gardens in Seattle. Written by landscape architects, this book is an excellent tool for supporters of community gardens in making their case in language understandable to urban planners and policy makers. For those of us already convinced, the breadth of activities at the profiled gardens will be surprising, and you could use this book as a unique travel guide to the Emerald City.

Reviewed by Curator of Horticultural Literature, Brian Thompson. Excerpted from the Fall 2010 Arboretum Bulletin.

Season: All Season
Date: 2013-08-14
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Keywords: Reviews

Garden Tool: "Mushrooms of the Pacific Northwest" is another in the fine series of Timber Press Field Guide. Like earlier works on wildflowers and insects, it's well designed to be a good field companion with a coated cover, a ruler on the back, and frequently needed facts easily found on the inside covers.

Particularly good is the long introduction which addresses subjects from the ecology of mushroom-fungi, the hazards of hunting in the Pacific Northwest, to "How to avoid becoming a poisoning statistic." Unlike many field guides, the text in the descriptive encyclopedia is in narrative form, rather than having set descriptive elements for each species. Not being a mushroom hunter, I can't vouch for the effectiveness at identification by this approach, but I found it enjoyable reading.

Reviewed by Curator of Horticultural Literature, Brian Thompson. Excerpted from the Fall 2010 Arboretum Bulletin.

Season: All Season
Date: 2013-08-14
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December 12 2014 11:33:49