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Search Results for ' Heuchera'

PAL Questions: 2 - Garden Tools:

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Keywords: Helianthemum, Helleborus, Heuchera, Propagation, Euphorbia

PAL Question:

I am wondering if the following plants can be divided or propagated successfully: Heuchera, Donkey Tail Spurge (Euphorbia), Corsican Hellebore, and Helianthemum.

View Answer:

I consulted The American Horticultural Society Plant Propagation book, edited by Alan Toogood (DK Publishing, 1999), and it says the following:

  1. Heuchera: by division or by seed in spring. Since cultivars may not come true from seed, I would recommend dividing your plants. Once spring growth has begun, lift the plant from the ground and remove small sections from around the edge (look for good roots, and 2-3 shoots).
  2. Euphorbia myrsinites: (Just a note: based on the USDA information that this plant is invasive in Oregon and banned in Colorado, I would think twice before propagating it. This species does a fine job of propagating itself, apparently. In general, the genus Euphorbia can be propagated by division in early spring, or from spring to summer, by seeds in fall or spring, and by cuttings in summer or fall, but if you were to propagate by cuttings, you would need to protect your skin from the sap.
  3. Helleborus argutifolius can be propagated by division after flowering, or by seeds in summer. Test seed capsules for readiness by gently squeezing. If the seed capsule splits to reveal dark seeds, it is ready for harvest. Wear gloves! H. argutifolius (Corsican hellebore) often self-seeds. Check around the base of the plant in spring. When each seedling has at least one true leaf, gently lift and transplant to moist, fertile soil in light shade.
  4. Helianthemum can be started from greenwood cuttings rooted in summer and fall, and by seeds sown in spring in a frost-free location.

If you would like further information on the relative ease or difficulty of each of these methods for each of these plants, I recommend coming to the Miller Library and looking at our books and other resources on propagation. Here is a link to a booklist.

Season All Season
Date 2007-04-11
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Keywords: Insect pests--Control, Root weevils, Heuchera, Bergenia

PAL Question:

What is the pest that eats little notches around my Bergenia and Heuchera? What can I do to prevent this?

View Answer:

It is possible your Bergenia and Heuchera are being nibbled by black vine weevils or strawberry root weevils. Usually you would begin to notice the damage in mid-spring. The notches won't kill your plants, but if you have a lot of black vine weevils and plants appear to be wilting, you may want to attempt to control the larvae. Spraying beneficial nematodes (Steinernema) on the surrounding soil may also help.

Below are links to information about weevils:

Black Vine Weevil from UMass Extension

Black Vine Weevils from University of California's Integrated Pest Management site

Strawberry Root Weevils from the University of Maine Cooperative Extension

Black Vine Weevil (and other root weevils) from Ohio State University Extension

Excerpt:

Adults that feed along leaf margins produce typical crescent shaped notches. Careful searches should be made to try and locate specimens since several other weevils and some caterpillars can produce this same type of notching. Moderate to light notching seems to have little effect on plant health.

Black vine weevils are oblong oval in shape, about 1/2-inch long and have a short, broad snout with elbowed antennae. The body is slate grey to blackish brown and the wing covers have numerous small pits and short hairs. This pest is difficult to distinguish from other Otiorhynchus weevils. The strawberry root weevil is usually half the size of the black vine weevil, and more brown in color. The rough strawberry root weevil is only slightly smaller than the black vine weevil but the collar just behind the head, the pronotum, is heavily pitted.

Female weevils emerge from soil pupation chambers late May to early July. These weevils must feed on plant material for 21 to 45 days before they are ready to lay eggs. After the preoviposition period has passed, the females place several eggs each day into the soil or leaf litter nearby suitable host plants. The weevils hide during the daytime at the base of plants or in mulch and leaf litter near food plants. Adults may live 90 to 100 days and usually lay 200 eggs during this time. The eggs hatch in two to three weeks and the small C-shaped, legless larvae feed on plant rootlets. The larvae grow slowly over the summer, molting five to six times. By late fall the larvae have matured and are about 5/8-inch long. The mature larvae enter a quiescent prepupal stage in an earthen cell and pupate the following spring. A single generation occurs each year.

Strategy 1: Habitat Modification - Egg and larval survival is helped when soil moisture is moderate to high in July and August. Heavy mulches also help maintain critical moisture levels. Remove excessive mulch layers and do not water plants unless necessary. Excessively damp soils in the fall also force larvae to move up the base of the plant where girdling can occur. Properly maintain rain down spouts and provide for adequate drainage of soil around plants.

Strategy 2: Biological Control Using Parasitic Nematodes - The entomopathogenic nematodes, Steinernema and Heterorhabditis spp., have been effective for controlling black vine weevil larvae, especially in potted plants. Sufficient water must be used during application to wash the infective nematodes into the soil and root zone. If the nematodes are to be used in landscape plantings, remove a much of the mulch as possible and thoroughly wet the remaining thatch and soil before and after the nematode application. Applications of the nematodes in landscapes has produced variable results.

Season All Season
Date 2007-11-09
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June 24 2013 12:55:25