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Search Results for ' Salvia'

PAL Questions: 2 - Garden Tools: 2

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Keywords: Zinnia, Daisies, Verbena, Coreopsis, Artemisia, Salvia, Lavandula, Achillea, Echinacea, Herb gardens, Xeriscaping, Tagetes, Sedum, Container gardening

PAL Question:

Our neighborhood has a small planter area at its entrance. There is no water supply to this area, but a nearby resident is willing to water occasionally. The soil contains much clay. We would like to plant a few drought-tolerant annuals to add color and supplement the more permanent shrubs--such as boxwood--planted in the area. Can you recommend some plant choices? How could we amend the soil to best hold water during the upcoming dry months? Would a commercial product such as "Quench" be of any value, in addition to organic mulches?

View Answer:

I found the following article by Nikki Phipps on GardeningKnowHow.com about drought-tolerant container planting. Here is an excerpt:

"...many plants not only thrive in containers but will tolerate hot, dry conditions as well. Some of these include annuals like marigolds, zinnias, salvia, verbenas, and a variety of daisies. Numerous perennials can be used in a xeriscape container garden such as Artemisia, sedum, lavender, coreopsis, Shasta daisy, liatris, yarrow, coneflower and more. There is even room for herbs and vegetables in the xeriscape container garden. Try growing oregano, sage, rosemary, and thyme. Vegetables actually do quite well in containers, especially the dwarf or bush varieties. There are also numerous ornamental grasses and succulents that perform nicely in containers as well."

The Brooklyn Botanic Garden's book The Potted Garden (21st Century Gardening Series, 2001) provides a list of drought-tolerant plants for containers.

I had not heard of Quench, but since it is cornstarch-based, it is certainly preferable to the hydrogel and polymer products which are more widely available. I found an article by garden writer Ann Lovejoy in the Seattle P-I (June 3, 2006) about Quench. Here is an excerpt:

With pots and containers, mix dry Quench into the top 12 inches of potting soil in each pot and top off with plain compost. Few roots will penetrate deeper than a foot, so it isn't very useful down in the depths of really big pots unless you are combining shrubs and perennials.

I would not recommend hydrogels or polymers as a soil amendment. Professor Linda Chalker-Scott of Washington State University has written about these products and their potential hazards. Here is a link to a PDF.

You could consider applying a liquid fertilizer (diluted seaweed-fish emulsion would work) to your containers once every week or two during summer. Here is general information on container maintenance, from Ohio State University Extension. Excerpt:

"Once planted, watering will be your most frequent maintenance chore, especially if you are growing plants in clay containers. On hot, sunny days small containers may need watering twice. Water completely so that water drains through the drainage hole and runs off. Water early in the day.

"If you incorporated a slow release fertilizer into the potting mix, you may not need to fertilize the rest of the season; some of these fertilizers last up to nine months. You can also use a water-soluble fertilizer and apply it according to the label directions during the season.

"Mulch can be applied over the container mix to conserve moisture and moderate summer temperatures. Apply about one inch deep.

"Depending on the plants you are growing, you will need to deadhead and prune as needed through the season. Monitor frequently for pests such as spider mites. Pests usually build up rapidly in containers."

Season All Season
Date 2007-04-05
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Keywords: Salvia, Drought-tolerant plants

PAL Question:

I recently planted several purple Salvia plants that have completely faded from beautiful, bright purple to beige. It has been really hot and dry and I've been watering them in clay soil once to twice a day. Is it possible that I'm overwatering them? Or do they need even more water since they were just planted?

View Answer:

I'm not sure what type of Salvia you are growing, but it is possible you are overwatering them. The heavy clay soil combined with watering 1-2 times daily sounds like too much for a plant that is drought-tolerant once established. To learn more about growing ornamental salvias, see this University of California, Davis Arboretum Review, #44, Fall 2003 article, "Salvias for Every Garden" by Ellen Zagory.

I would suggest watering less often, but watering more deeply, and possibly mulching around the plants. Some xeriscaping resources suggest using gravel, and it is mentioned in this document from New Mexico State University Extension, "Landscape Water Conservation: Principles of Xeriscape" by Curtis Smith, with the caution that although "some plants native to very well drained soils grow better in gravel mulches [...] rock mulch becomes very hot in our climate and can injure or limit growth of some plants. Ultimately, the mulch should be shaded by landscape plants that will provide environmental cooling. Using gravel mulch alone as a landscape element may result in increased home cooling bills and require greater weed control efforts."

This article by Seattle-area garden writer Ann Lovejoy on drought-tolerant gardening may also be of interest.

Season All Season
Date 2007-07-09
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Keywords: Salvia, Phygelius, Hummingbirds, Gardening to attract birds

Garden Tool: Encourage hummingbirds to visit your garden by providing food and shelter. While hummingbird feeders bring the tiny birds close to the house for easy viewing, providing nectar from flowers is probably better for the birds. Phygelius, Salvia, and hardy Fuchsias in pink and red shades will make them happy. For winter food try the glorious Mahonia x media 'Charity' which tends to start blooming sweet yellow flowers in December. Everything you ever wanted to know about hummers: www.hummingbirds.net. This site has migration maps, ratings of feeders, and species descriptions with photos.

Season: Summer
Date: 2007-04-03
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Keywords: Sarcococca, Plant cuttings, Salvia, Lavandula, Propagation, Rhododendron, Gaultheria shallon, Penstemon, Holly, Cistus, Ceanothus

Garden Tool:

Make new plants by taking softwood cuttings. Cuttings Through the Year, a booklet published by the Arboretum Foundation(available for sale at the Washington Park Arboretum gift shop) suggests which plants to propagate month by month and how to do it. A few September plants include: Rock Rose, Salal, Lavender, Holly, Penstemon, evergreen azaleas, Sweet box, Salvia, California Lilac and many others.

For a tutorial on taking softwood cuttings go online to a Fine Gardening article complete with clear color photos: www.taunton.com/finegardening/pages/g00002.asp

Season: All Season
Date: 2006-10-23
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June 24 2013 12:55:25