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Search Results for ' Taxus baccata'

PAL Questions: 3 - Garden Tools:

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Keywords: Berberis, Trachelospermum, Euonymus, Taxus baccata, Screens, Thuja, Nandina domestica, Hydrangea, Ilex, Hedges, Clematis, Buxus, Bamboo

PAL Question:

Could you recommend some plants for a privacy screen that are also narrow? These would be planted in front of a fence in our backyard.

View Answer:

Here is some general information on plants for creating a screen.

Trees for Problem Landscape Sites -- Screening from Virginia Cooperative Extension

Good Hedges Make Good Neighbors from the United States National Arboretum

Bet on Hedges by local garden writer Valerie Easton.

Here is a list of narrow plants for a screen from local garden designer Chris Pfeiffer:

Fastigiate shrubs for naturally narrow hedges. Compiled by Chris Pfeiffer. 2005.

Zones 5-6:

American arborvitae ‘Rheingold’ (Thuja occidentalis ‘Rheingold’) 5’h x 3’w

Barberry ‘Helmond Pillar’ (Berberis thunbergii f. atropurpurea 'Helmond Pillar') 6’h x 2’w

Boxwood ‘Graham Blandy’ (Buxus sempervirens ‘Graham Blandy’) 8’h x 1-1/2’ w

English yew ‘Standishii’ (Taxus baccata ‘Standishii’) 4’h x 1-1/2’ w

Irish yew (Taxus baccata ‘Fastigiata’) 20’ h x 4’ w

Japanese holly Jersey pinnacle (Ilex crenata ‘Jersey Pinnacle’) 6’ h x 4’w

Japanese holly Mariesii (Ilex crenata ‘Mariesii) 3’ h x 1-1/2’ w

Zones 7-9, in addition to the above:

Dwarf yeddo rhaphiolepis (Rhaphiolepis umbellata Gulf GreenTM) 3-4’ h x 2’w

Heavenly bamboo ‘Gulf Stream’ (Nandina domestica ‘Gulf Stream’) 4’h x 2’w

Japanese euonymus ‘Green Spire’ (Euonymus japonicus ‘Green Spire’) 15’h x 6’w

You might also consider installing a trellis to increase the height of the fence, and then growing an evergreen vine such as Clematis armandii, evergreen hydrangea (Hydrangea seemanii), or star jasmine (Trachelospermum jasminoides).

This link is also helpful (scroll down to "Evergreen Vines" and look for appropriate height and light requirements).

You could grow bamboo, but I would recommend growing it in a container, or a series of containers, as you do not want the roots to spread. I have seen an effective bamboo screen between two houses growing in a long rectangular lined wooden trough (lined with bamboo barrier). Some species of bamboo are more tolerant of partial shade than others. Look for a clumping, rather than a running, bamboo (like Fargesia) to be on the safe side.

Growing Bamboo in Georgia

Running and Clumping Bamboos

Bamboos for hedges or tall privacy screens

Season All Season
Date 2008-01-03
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Keywords: Veronicastrum, Thalictrum, Actaea, Filipendula, Baptisia, Eupatorium, Berberis, Euonymus, Digitalis, Taxus baccata, Thuja, Verbascum, Helenium, Anemone, Ilex, Buxus

PAL Question:

I am redoing the narrow planting areas (2-3' wide) on either side of our 20' long entry. Garages from next door townhouses butt up against the outer edge on each side, causing morning sun and afternoon shade on one side, and vice versa on the other side. I have picked out some euphorbias, heucheras, and carexes which should do well. I'm wondering if I should have some taller, more dramatic plants to offset these and if you have any suggestions of ones which might work. Also, any bulb ideas would be appreciated.

View Answer:

Have you considered putting up trellises on one or both sides? Then you could grow vines which require little width, but still have the advantage of height. You could also grow taller plants (maybe some grasses like Miscanthus or even a well-restricted--using root barrier--Bamboo) in containers, and keep them shaped to suit the narrow space. Some shrubs and trees are naturally narrow or fastigiate in growth habit.

Here is a list of narrow plants compiled by local garden designer Chris Pfeiffer,c2005. Some will be too wide for your planting area, but you might want to research those that fit the site.

American arborvitae 'Rheingold' (Thuja occidentalis 'Rheingold') 5'h x 3' w

Barberry 'Helmond Pillar' (Berberis thunbergii f. atropurpurea 'Helmond Pillar') 6'h x 2'w

Boxwood 'Graham Blandy' (Buxus sempervirens 'Graham Blandy') 8'h x 1-1/2'w

English yew 'Standishii' (Taxus baccata 'Standishii') 4'h x 1-1/2'w

Irish yew (Taxus baccata 'Fastigiata') 20'h x 4'w

Japanese holly Jersey pinnacle (Ilex crenata 'Jersey Pinnacle') 6'h x 4'w

Japanese holly Mariesii (Ilex crenata 'Mariesii) 3'h x 1-1/2'w

Dwarf yeddo rhaphiolepis (Rhaphiolepis umbellata 'Gulf Green') 3-4'h x 2'w

Heavenly bamboo 'Gulf Stream' (Nandina domestica 'Gulf Stream') 4'h x 2'w

Japanese euonymus 'Green Spire' (Euonymus japonicus 'Green Spire') 15'h x 6'w

There are also a good number of tall perennials you might try, such as (for your afternoon sunny side) Helenium, Verbascum, Baptisia, Eupatorium, and bulbous plants like Allium and Eremurus, and for your shadier morning sun side, Macleaya, Digitalis, Filipendula ulmaria, Anemone hybrida, Actaea (formerly called Cimicifuga), Lilium martagon, Thalictrum, and Veronicastrum.

There are many excellent gardening books you could consult for ideas. Since you have a small, narrow space, I highly recommend local garden writer Marty Wingate's book, Big Ideas for Northwest Small Gardens (Sasquatch Books, 2003). You are welcome to visit the Miller Library, where you can do further research and also borrow books.

Season All Season
Date 2007-10-03
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Keywords: Taxus baccata, Vegetative propagation, Conifers--Propagation

PAL Question:

I planted a Taxus baccata fastigiata roughly 10 years ago and it grew to about 1.5m. Unfortunately it was cut down by mistake. Is there any way I could take a cutting from the tree or some way to preserve any part of it, as it holds great sentimental value.

View Answer:

According to The Complete Book of Plant Propagation, edited by Charles Heuser (Newtown, CT: Taunton Press, 1997), your yew can be propagated by cuttings, but it is recommended that the cuttings be taken in fall. It's worth a try to take some now, though, since the tree is already cut. You want upward-growing, semi-ripe cuttings (that is, there should be some bark at the base and some green stem at the tip), and they should be pulled off with a downward motion so that you get a "heel" of bark from the main shoot. Treat them with rooting hormone and place in a pot somewhere where it can remain cool and moist for several months. Take plenty of cuttings to increase your chance that at least one will survive.

American Horticultural Society's Plant Propagation, edited by Alan Toogood (New York: DK Publishing, 1999), has more specific suggestions. They suggest a 4-6 inch cutting from 1-3 year old wood that is still green at the base.

If your yew made seeds, you might try planting them, but it takes a long time for them to germinate and grow from seed. To grow from seed, the AHS Plant Propagation recommends mixing the seeds with damp peat or sand and keeping them at about 68 degrees for 4-6 months, then at 34 degrees for 1 month before planting. If the seeds germinate in late summer, though, they won't be ready to winter outdoors that year. For this reason, the AHS also suggests simply sowing the seeds outdoors and waiting for germination in 1-2 years. If you do this, be careful not to lose your sown seeds while waiting for them to grow!

Season All Season
Date 2008-06-11
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December 12 2014 11:33:49