Elisabeth C. Miller Library logo Miller Library Home UW Botanic Gardens Home UW Botanic Gardens Home book graphic

3501 NE 41st Street, Seattle, WA 98195 | (206) 543 0415 | Open: | Library Schedule

Gardening Answers Knowledgebase

Plant Answer Line Question

Keywords: Crassula, Insect pests--Identification, Insect pests--Control, House plants

My 100-year-old Jade plant is about 5 feet tall and recently has been producing a sap from its leaves. White and sticky. Is there anything I can do to help this? Is it normal? Or is it endangering the plant? It is in kind of a cool spot; should I move it to a warmer place? It is a succulent, right? I would also like some information about repotting if necessary.

Answer:

The pests most likely to cause a white, sticky substance are aphids, whiteflies, scale or mealybugs. These are known to affect jade plant, or Crassula ovata, which is indeed a succulent. They won't destroy plants, but can weaken them and allow other problems to surface. If none of the pest descriptions below resemble what you are observing, you can take affected plant samples to a local county extension agent. Without knowing the specific pest, we can't suggest specific treatments. Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides has general information on caring for houseplants. Note their description of mealybugs, which do produce a sticky substance:
"These insects look like little bits of cotton that are greasy or waxy. They are oval in shape, have a segmented body, and are about 1/4 inch long. You'll usually find them hidden between leaves and stems or under leaves. They move slowly. They make a sticky liquid called honeydew and also cause leaves to become distorted and spotted."

As for temperature and repotting, The New House Plant Expert (by D. Hessayon, 1991, p. 212), says that succulents like a difference between day and nighttime temperatures. They like to be kept cool in the winter, with 50-55 degrees F ideal, but as low as 40 is alright. Jade plants should only be repotted when essential. Repotting should occur in the spring; shallow pots rather than deep ones are preferable.

Extensive care information can be found on Succulent-plant.com. There is also excellent general information on indoor care of succulents and cacti from Brooklyn Botanic Garden.

Date 2017-02-16
Link to this record only (permalink)


Didn't find an answer to your question? Ask us directly!

Browse keywords

Search Again:

May 16 2018 11:15:37