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Search Results for ' Noise pollution'

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Keywords: Noise pollution, Bamboo

PAL Question:

Could you recommend some plants that would be effective at screening out noise from a nearby, busy street? Would bamboo be effective? Any other suggestions?

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I have some suggestions for planting and otherwise screening your property from the busy street adjacent to your house. I've started with an article from the Washington Post (linked below) that provides good food for thought about this problem. After providing some related information that you may not have considered (#1), I've given you a list of plants, most of which are native (#2). Since you have a relatively small area, you will have to plan carefully.

Here is the link to the article from the Washington Post.

1. My research indicates that a fence or other solid barrier--massive and thick, such as a brick wall or a berm--provides a more effective barrier to sound than a planting screen.

University of British Columbia Botanical Garden Forums has a discussion on this topic, including this citation:
From the book Arboriculture, third edition, Harris et al., page 138, figure 5-8 caption:
"Thirty meters of trees and shrubs reduce truck noise about as effectively as a similiar area of bare cultivated ground. A berm, slope or solid barrier with woody plants would be more effective in absorbing noise (Cook and Van Haverbeke 1971)."

2. You may decide to mask the sound. In addition to music, chimes, and the sound of water in a fountain, you might consider trees that rustle in the wind. You mentioned bamboo, and given your small space, I would recommend a clumping rather than a running bamboo. The frequently asked questions section of the American Bamboo Society website has information about choosing and growing bamboo. Unfortunately, the clumping types prefer sheltered spots and/or shade. You might consider planting some evergreen trees or shrubs on the edge of the property to shade the bamboo, which could be planted closer to the house (and the rustling sound would be closer to the windows). Or you could plant a running type of bamboo (some can take full sun) in a container or using a barrier.

Evergreen trees and shrubs will provide the most effective barrier. Trees such as members of the Thuja genus in combination with a fence may be a place to start, but for more interesting ideas, try visiting the Great Plant Picks website. You can search with the word 'hedge' and come up with a good list of plants that will do well in the Pacific Northwest.

Season All Season
Date 2006-11-07
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December 12 2014 11:33:49