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Gardening Answers Knowledgebase

Search Results for ' Trees--Pacific Northwest'

PAL Questions: 2 - Garden Tools: - Recommended Websites: 2

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Keywords: Rhamnus purshiana, Pyrus, Nyssa, Hovenia, Oxydendrum arboreum, Cornus nuttallii, Malus, Crataegus, Native plants--Care and maintenance, Trees--Pacific Northwest, Quercus, Multipurpose trees, Prunus, Acer

PAL Question:

Can you recommend some tree species (deciduous) that can have wet feet but will also tolerate dry conditions in the summer? The recommendations should be trees that are not too messy (no cottonwoods or alders, please) and not too big. I would like to plant some trees near a swale in my yard - so they could be sitting in soggy ground during the winter.

View Answer:

Following is a list of possibilities, most of which come from Water Conserving Plants for the Pacific Northwest West of the Cascades (by the N.W. Perennial Alliance, 1993). The list includes only trees that 1) thrive in soils which are waterlogged in the winter, and, 2) grow to less than 40 feet tall.

ACER (maple):
A. buergeranum (trident maple)
A. campestre (field maple)
A. ginnala (Amur maple)
A. circinatum (vine maple)
CORNUS nuttallii (western dogwood)
C. douglasii (black hawthorn)
C. monogyna
C. phaenopyrum (Washington thorn)
C. x lavallei (Carriere hawthorn)
HOVENIA dulcis (Japanese raisin tree)
MALUS fusca (Pacific crab apple)
NYSSA sylvatica (black gum)
OXYDENDRUM arboreum (sourwood)
PRUNUS (prune/plum/cherry):
P. virginiana var. melanocarpa (chokecherry)
P. emarginata (bitter cherry)
PYRUS (pear):
P. communis (common pear)
P. pyrifolia (Chinese pear, sand pear)
QUERCUS (oak):
Q. acutissima (sawtooth oak)
Q. imbricaria (shingle oak)
RHAMNUS purshiana (cascara)

Season Winter
Date 2006-05-23
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Keywords: Magnolia grandiflora, Trees--Pacific Northwest

PAL Question:

I was reading a Seattle Times article and was hoping that you could tell me more about Magnolia grandiflora 'Alta' and its hardiness in the Pacific Northwest and what its mature dimensions would be.

View Answer:

Magnolia grandiflora 'Alta' is a trademarked Monrovia introduction. According to their website, it is "very slow growing to 20 ft. tall, 9 ft. wide in 10 years." Since this is a relatively recent introduction, there is not going to be much information about its hardiness in our area until more gardeners have grown it and shared their experiences. The longevity of the species Magnolia grandiflora and its cultivars can only be estimated (between 50-150 years, according to SelecTree.) Trees grown in urban settings are often affected by root disturbance, pollution, and the like, so their lives may be somewhat toward the short end of the expectancy range.

The local website of Great Plant Picks lists two different cultivars of Magnolia grandiflora, which may give you some idea of how well they do in our area. Here is an excerpt:

"Provide southern magnolias with good drainage and full to partial sun. They thrive in hot spots, where the extra heat encourages better flowering. These flowering evergreens prefer well-drained, sandy soil, but they tolerate average garden soil. Best growth and flowering requires occasional summer watering, but once established, southern magnolias withstand considerable drought. Garden gently under magnolias, for they have fleshy roots that can easily be damaged. The best approach for companions plants is to tuck in natural spreaders and let them flourish untouched."

From my observations, they do not do well in the occasional winters when we have heavy snowfall, as their evergreen leaf-laden branches are prone to breaking under the weight of snow. Otherwise, they seem to survive here.

Season All Season
Date 2008-01-24
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December 12 2014 11:33:49