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Gardening Answers Knowledgebase

Search Results for ' Timber'

PAL Questions: 1 - Garden Tools:

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Keywords: Cedrus, Timber

PAL Question:

Given that the Atlas cedar is a true cedar (as opposed to the Western red cedar), does the wood have any particular aromatic or bug-resistant qualities?

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I checked The International Book of Wood (edited by Martyn Bramwell; Emblem, 1979), and here is what it says about Cedrus:
"True cedar is a softwood produced by three species. The cedar of antiquity is the cedar of Lebanon, used in the construction of the royal tombs of the early kings of Egypt and by Solomon in the building of the Temple; the deodar of northern India is almost as famous, and the third species is the Atlas cedar [Cedrus atlantica] of the mountains of Algeria and Morocco. [...] The wood of the three species is similar, pale-brown, with a fairly well-defined growth ring, and characterized by a fragrant smell. It is of medium weight for a softwood, a little heavier than European redwood. Cedar dries readily though with a tendency to distort. It is inclined to be brittle and, generally, is not a strong wood; it works easily and takes a fine finish. It is noted for its resistance to both fungi and termites."

This link from Plants for a Future database mentions its fragrance, as well as its fungus- and insect-repelling qualities:
"An essential oil obtained from the distilled branches is a good antiseptic and fungicide that stimulates the circulatory and respiratory systems and also calms the nerves. [...] An essential oil obtained from the distilled branches is used in perfumery, notably in jasmine-scented soaps. The essential oil also repels insects.[...] Wood - fragrant and durable. It is prized for joinery and veneer and is also used in construction. It is also used for making insect-repellent articles for storing textiles."

Season All Season
Date 2010-06-19
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June 24 2013 12:55:25

 
 
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