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School of Public Health

Mary Anne Mercer

faculty photo
Senior Lecturer, Health Services
Senior Lecturer, Global Health (primary appt.)

Education

DrPH   Johns Hopkins University, 1987   (Maternal and Child Health)
MPH   Johns Hopkins University, 1981   (International Health)

Contact Info

email:   mamercer@uw.edu

address:
Health Alliance International
1107 NE 45th Street, Suite 350 OR
PO Box 354809
Seattle, WA 98105

campus box:   354809
voice:   206-543-8382
fax:   206-685-4184

About

Mary Anne Mercer, DrPH, MPH, is a public health practitioner specializing in the delivery of maternal and child health services in developing countries, with a special interest in the effect of globalization on health. Dr. Mercer began her international work in rural Nepal, and since then has provided technical support to a number of health programs in Asia and Africa. Between 1989 and 1994 she directed a technical support program at Johns Hopkins University for NGOs implementing programs for HIV/AIDS prevention in Africa, and subsequently was deputy director of the Johns Hopkins-based PVO Child Survival Support Program. She is co-editor of a 2004 book Sickness and Wealth: The Corporate Assault on Global Health. Dr. Mercer is currently a Senior Technical Advisor at Health Alliance International, where she supports a program for maternal/newborn care and child spacing in Timor-Leste. She is also a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Global Health at the University of Washington.


International health; maternal and child health



Nie J, Unger JA, Thompson S, Hofstee M, Gu J, Mercer MA. Does mobile phone ownership predict better utilization of maternal and newborn health services? a cross-sectional study in Timor-Leste. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2016 Jul 23;16(1):183. doi: 10.1186/s12884-016-0981-1.  PMID: 27448798    PMCID: PMC4958409
   


Meiksin R, Meekers D, Thompson S, Hagopian A, Mercer MA. Domestic Violence, Marital Control, and Family Planning, Maternal, and Birth Outcomes in Timor-Leste. Matern Child Health J. 2014 Dec 6. [Epub ahead of print]  PMID: 25480470
  


Gimbel S, Voss J, Mercer MA, Zierler B, Gloyd S, Coutinho Mde J, Floriano F, Cuembelo Mde F, Einberg J, Sherr K. The prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV cascade analysis tool: supporting health managers to improve facility-level service delivery. BMC Res Notes. 2014 Oct 21;7:743. doi: 10.1186/1756-0500-7-743.  PMID: 25335783    PMCID: PMC4216351
   


Mercer MA, Thompson SM, de Araujo RM. The role of international NGOs in health systems strengthening: the case of timor-leste. Int J Health Serv. 2014;44(2):323-35.  PMID: 24919307
 


Gimbel S, Voss J, Rustagi A, Mercer MA, Zierler B, Gloyd S, Coutinho Mde J, Cuembelo Mde F, Sherr K. What does high and low have to do with it? Performance classification to identify health system factors associated with effective prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV delivery in Mozambique. J Int AIDS Soc. 2014 Mar 24;17(1):18828. doi: 10.7448/IAS.17.1.18828. eCollection 2014.  PMID: 24666594    PMCID: PMC3965711
  


2013
Chair, capstone for Jenna Udren
Quality of maternal care in public facilities for women living with HIV: Perceptions from two districts in Uttar Pradesh, India

2012
Chair, capstone for Paula Kett
Perspectives on preferences for care and barriers in access to maternal health services in Mbita, Kenya

2012
Chair, capstone for Erin Larsen-Cooper
Planning for the worst & hoping for the best: Developing transportation plans for pregnant women in Malawi

Health Alliance International 8 (Moz. Health Comm.)
Health Alliance International (HAI)
PI:   Holmes           Dates:    10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016

Health Alliance International 8 (Moz. Health Comm.)
Health Alliance International (HAI)
PI:   Wasserheit           Dates:    10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015

Health Alliance International 8 (Moz. Health Comm.)
Health Alliance International (HAI)
PI:   Holmes           Dates:    1/1/2014 - 9/30/2014

Health Alliance International 8 (Moz. Health Comm.)
Health Alliance International (HAI)
PI:   Holmes           Dates:    10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013

East Timor Village Health Promotion Project

This project aims to improve basic health understanding and skills, including decision-making regarding the use of health services, in the Venilale subdistrict of Baucau District in the new nation of East Timor. Collaborators are the Salesian Sisters of Venilale, who operate a health clinic, and the local health center of the East Timor Ministry of Health. Villlage Health Promoters (VHPs) from rural areas surrounding Venilale have been trained in home care and indications for referral for diarrheal disease and tuberculosis, and in basic issues surrounding safe pregnancy/delivery and immunizations. The VHPs are supervised monthly and receive regular refresher training. If the project is found to provide significant benefits it may be expanded to other areas of East Timor.


Central Mozambique Child Survival and Maternal Care Project

The goal of this project is to bring about reductions in infant, perinatal and maternal mortality and morbidity in the two central provinces of Mozambique. The project interventions are maternal and newborn care, STD/HIV/AIDS prevention, and malaria control. The program design includes two main strategies: mobilizing communities to adopt better health practices and to use improved services, and strengthening the quality of the health-care delivery system so that services will meet newly-raised community expectations.


Maternal Health Care in Dili, East Timor

This project aims to provide basic maternity services (prenatal, delivery, and postnatal care) to women in Dili, East Timor, and to contribute to the ability of the East Timorese people to provide for their own health care needs. The project supported training and supervision of Timorese midwives and the upgrading of training and maternal care facilities at Bairo Pite Clinic in Dili, East Timor. Trained midwives expanded the prenatal care services to include outreach areas in Dili neighborhoods that were otherwise without access to care.