UW Japan Studies Program

Japan Program Faculty Campus Wide

MARIE ANCHORDOGUY

Jackson School

Marie Anchordoguy is a professor in the Jackson School of International Studies and specializes in the political economy of Japan. She received her undergraduate, masters and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California, Berkeley. Her research is focused primarily on the key institutions and policies of Japan’s capitalist system.

For more information, visit her page on the Jackson School site.


AraiANDREA GEVURTZ ARAI

Jackson School

Andrea Gevurtz Arai is an affiliate lecturer in the Jackson School of International Studies, and specializes in the anthropology of modern Japan as well as global sustainability movements. She received her Ph.D. in anthropology from Columbia University.

For more information, visit her page on the Jackson School site.


PAUL S. ATKINS

Asian Languages and Literature

Paul Atkins, associate professor of Japanese and chairman of the Department of Asian Languages and Literature, specializes in classical/premodern Japanese literature and drama.

For more information, visit his page on the Asian Languages and Literature site.


DAVINDER L. BHOWMIK 

Asian Languages and Literature

Davinder L. Bhowmik is an associate professor in the Department of Asian Languages and Literature. She received a Ph.D. in modern Japanese literature from the University of Washington in 1997. Her research focuses on questions of history, memory, and representation in atomic bomb fiction as well as issues of language, identity, and culture in Okinawan fiction.

For more information, visit her page on the Asian Languages and Literature site.


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DANIEL FOOTE

School of Law

Daniel H. Foote is Professor of Law and Co-Director of the Asian Law Center. Through a joint professorship, he is also Professor of Law at The University of Tokyo, where he holds the post in Sociology of Law.

For more information, visit his page on the School of Law site.


Hasegawa

KAZUMI HASEGAWA

History

Kazumi Hasegawa is a lecturer within the Department of History. Her research and writing focus on international history between the U.S. and Japan, particularly by examining the life of Oyabe Zen’ichirō (1867-1941), a Christian minister, influential educator of the Ainu people, and best-selling writer, and explores the way transnational discourses about race contributed to the formation of modern Japanese identity.

For more information, visit her page on the Department of History site.


DONALD C. HELLMANN

Jackson School

Donald C. Hellmann is a professor emeritus in the Jackson School of International Studies and the Department of Political Science and director of the Institute for International Policy (IIP). He received his undergraduate education at Princeton University and holds M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in political science from the University of California, Berkeley.

For more information, visit his page on the Jackson School site.


AKIKO IWATA

Asian Languages and Literature

Akiko Iwata is a lecturer of Japanese language in the Department of Asian Languages and Literature. Iwata received her first M.A. in English as Second Language from the University of Minnesota in 2001 and her second M.A. in Japanese language pedagogy from Columbia University in 2002. Her research focuses on language acquisition, especially development of authentic materials for advanced-level learners.

For more information, visit her page on the Asian Languages and Literature site.


Justin Jesty

JUSTIN JESTY

Asian Languages and Literature

Justin Jesty is assistant professor in Asian Languages and Literature at the University of Washington where he researches the relationship between visual arts and social movements in postwar Japan and teaches on Japanese film, modern literature, and post-1945 art.

For more information, visit his page on the Asian Languages and Literature site.


TED MACK

Asian Languages and Literature

Ted Mack is an associate professor of modern Japanese literature in the Department of Asian Languages and Literature. He received his M.A. in modern Japanese literature from Columbia University and his Ph.D. from Harvard University. His areas of interest include modern Japanese language prose, art in capitalist marketplaces, the flow of literary works throughout the larger Japanese linguistic community, the function of power in the literary field, and theories of diaspora and heterogeneity, particularly as they challenge culturalist concepts of national identity.

For more information, visit his page on the Asian Languages and Literature site.


IZUMI MATSUDA-KIAMI

Asian Languages and Literature

Izumi Matsuda-Kiami, senior lecturer of Japanese language, received an M.A. in Japanese linguistics from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Her research focuses on Japanese language and pedagogy, especially in technology-enhanced language learning for intermediate to upper-level courses. Before coming to the University of Washington in 1996, she taught Japanese at Michigan State University and at Connecticut College.

For more information, visit her page on the Asian Languages and Literature site.


ITSUKO NISHIKAWA

Asian Languages and Literature

Itsuko Nishikawa is a senior lecturer in the Department of Asian Languages and Literature. She received an M.A. in Applied Linguistics from Teachers College, Columbia University. Her research focuses on Japanese language pedagogy, particularly in writing and assessment. She has taught beginner to advanced language levels both in the United States and in Japan. She has taught all all language levels at the University of Washington and is currently in charge of fourth-year Japanese.

For more information, visit her page on the Asian Languages and Literature site.


AMY SNYDER OHTA

Asian Languages and Literature

Amy Snyder Ohta is an associate professor in the Department of Asian Languages and Literature. Her research and teaching fields include applied linguistics, acquisition of Japanese as a second language, sociolinguistics, and bilingualism.

For more information, visit her page on the Asian Languages and Literature site.


KAORU OHTA

Asian Languages and Literature

Kaoru Ohta is a senior lecturer in the Department of Asian Languages and Literature. He earned M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in linguistics from the University of California, Los Angeles. His research is on Japanese linguistics, syntax, and morphology.

For more information, visit his page on the Asian Languages and Literature site.


KEN TADASHI OSHIMA

Architecture

Ken Tadashi Oshima is Chair of the UW Japan Studies and Professor in the Department of Architecture at the University of Washington, where he teaches in the areas of trans-national architectural history, theory and design. He earned an A.B. degree, magna cum laude, in East Asian Studies and Visual & Environmental Studies from Harvard College, Masters of Architecture degree from University of California Berkeley, and Ph.D. in architectural history and theory from Columbia University.

For more information, visit his page on the Architecture site.


ROBERT J. PEKKANEN

Jackson School

Robert J. Pekkanen is Professor at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, Adjunct Professor of Political Science, and Adjunct Professor of Sociology at the University of Washington. He received his Ph.D. in political science from Harvard University in 2002. His research interests lie in electoral systems, political parties and civil society. He has published articles in political science journals such as The American Political Science Review, The British Journal of Political Science, and Comparative Political Studies, as well Asian studies journals including The Journal of Asian Studies and The Journal of Japanese Studies.

For more information, visit his personal website or his page on the Jackson School site.


SAADIA M. PEKKANEN

Jackson School

Saadia Pekkanen is the founding Director of the Jackson School Ph.D. Program and the Job and Gertrud Tamaki Professor at the Jackson School of International Studies. She is Adjunct Professor in the Department of Political Science, and Adjunct Professor at the School of Law where she also teaches courses. Her areas of research interest include international political economy, international law, space security and policy, and the international relations of Japan/Asia.

For more information, visit her page on the Jackson School site.


KENNETH B. PYLE

Jackson School

Kenneth B. Pyle is the Henry M. Jackson Professor Emeritus of History and Asian Studies and founding president of the National Bureau of Asian Research. Pyle received a B.A. magna cum laude from Harvard College and his Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University.

Pyle will be retiring after 51 years of teaching at the University of Washington.

For more information, visit his page on the Jackson School Site.


KYOKO TOKUNO

Jackson School

Kyoko Tokuno is a senior lecturer in Comparative Religion at the Jackson School of International Studies. She is a graduate of the University of California, Berkeley, and received a Ph.D. in Buddhist Studies in 1994. Since then she has taught at the University of Oregon and joined the UW faculty in 2001. Her current interests focus on Buddhist texts and culture of medieval China and Japan, their relation to Indian Buddhism, and development of Buddhist canon in East Asia.

For more information, visit her page on the Jackson School site.