Jackson School Journal
of International Studies

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The Jackson School Journal is gearing up for another publication round, and we want to publish YOU!

We are currently accepting submissions for our Spring 2013 issue. We accept Qualifying Papers, research papers and policy papers, and generally look for submissions about 10-15 double-spaced pages in length, though you’re welcome to submit something shorter or longer. Submissions go through a double-blind peer review process, and if your piece is selected you get the chance to work closely with an editor and faculty members. Plus, you get to see your name in print! Submissions are due October 5, 2012.

For more information, check out the Submissions tab, or email us at jsjis@uw.edu.

The Journal is also looking for new Peer Reviewers and Editors!

The Journal depends on a core group of peer reviewers every quarter to help select pieces for publication. Our editorial board then works with authors and faculty to produce the journal. Reviewers and editors are eligible to receive 1-2 credits of SIS 499 (Independent Study) for working with the Journal. Reviewing is also a great way to get involved with the Journal, especially for those interested in applying for the Editorial Board.

For more information, check out the Reviewing tab. To become a peer reviewer, email us at jsjis@uw.edu.

Our Spring 2012 issue features a policy briefing by author Heather Campbell who addresses the increasingly salient shortcomings of the microfinance institution. Campbell critiques the prevailing microcredit trope that capital alone is capable of generating meaningful social change for impoverished women. Campbell discusses the potential of the SHG model in India as a boon for social programming and structure, which she argues are both essential elements for the successful application of microcredit. In the past year international concern over the failing efficacy of the microfinance institution has heightened due to a significant rise in suicide rates among men and women who are unable to pay off their debts, often incurred by towering interests rates. BBC 4 Radio’s spot “The Bankers and the Bottom Billion” shares an intimate story about women living within the slums of India who are targets of financial services and victims of the “rapid injection of investment capital.” This program notably coincides with Muhammad Yunus’ resignation from Grameen Bank in May 2011 and the resulting criticism of the Grameen banking model. Following Yunus’ dismissal from Grameen, other microfinance CEOs have felt pressure to step down. Further, this May, nearly a year after Yunus’ resignation, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has announced support for Grameen Bank as an independent organization where “poor women themselves are the owners.” What do you think? Is the Grameen model effective or does it do more harm than good?
- Rebekah Kennel, Editor

Related to this issue:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0112fz9 – BBC 4 Radio program on the downfall of Muhammad Yunus and resulting criticism of Grameen Bank.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-15866827 – More microfinance CEOs step down under building pressure.

http://india.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/02/27/yunus-was-right-sks-microfinance-founder-says/ – New York Times post on Indian suicides linked to microfinance debt.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-17973267 – Nearly a year after Yunus’ resignation, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton backs Grameen Bank.

Jonathan Morduch, Professor of Public Policy and Economics at NYU Wagner http://wagner.nyu.edu/morduch

His website features a short clip “Is microlending the solution for global poverty?” which discusses the evolving nature of the microcredit enterprise, specifically the combining of financial services with healthcare services. This holistic approach uses financial services as a platform for a wide range of other services.

Come celebrate the latest issue of the Jackson School Journal!

JSSA and the Jackson School Journal are throwing a party to celebrate the release of the Spring 2012 issue and thank all the peer reviewers and authors involved!

There will be light treats, and Heather Campbell, one of the Spring 2012 issue’s authors, will be speaking briefly about her experiences researching in India.

To RSVP for the reception, visit the Facebook event page here.

To read the Spring 2012 issue of the Jackson School Journal, click here.

To learn more about JSSA, visit their website here.

We hope to see you there!

Drumroll please…

The Jackson School Journal’s fourth issue is now online! Our Spring 2012 features explorations of the gender dimensions of microfinance in India, reasons for the post-independence peace in Tanzania, and business interest groups in Japan, as well as an interview with former election observer Philip Howard! To read on and download your own copy, check it out here: Vol. 3 No. 1 (Spring 2012)

Much gratitude for the production of this issue goes to our authors — Laura Araki, Heather Campbell, and Alicia Erickson — and our Autumn 2011 peer reviewers — Talia Alongi, Annie Banel, Lisa Bergstrom, Natalie Block, Rachel Brown, Rachel Deane, Udai Dhamija, Allie Ferguson, Sherrie Hsu, Sarah Kane, Matthew Little, Kelsey Price, Kaela Reilly, Marcus Sweetser, McKenzie Templeton, and Roger Ying. Many thanks also to our faculty Advisory Board and Professor Philip Howard for sharing his stories with us.

The Jackson School Journal is gearing up for another publication round, and we want to publish YOU!

We are currently accepting submissions for our Fall 2012 issue. We accept Qualifying Papers, research papers and policy papers, and generally look for submissions about 10-15 double-spaced pages in length, though you’re welcome to submit something shorter or longer. Submissions go through a double-blind peer review process, and if your piece is selected you get the chance to work closely with an editor and faculty members. Plus, you get to see your name in print! Submissions are due April 6, 2012.

For more information, check out the Submissions tab, or email us at jsjis@uw.edu.

The Journal is also looking for Peer Reviewers!

The Journal depends on a core group of peer reviewers every quarter to help select pieces for publication. Reviewers are eligible to receive 1 credit of SIS 499 (Independent Study) for working with the Journal. Reviewing is also a great way to get involved with the Journal, especially for those interested in applying for the Editorial Board.

For more information, check out the Reviewing tab. To become a peer reviewer, email us at jsjis@uw.edu.

JSIS senior and Daily reporter Sandi Halimuddin shares her experience traveling to Indonesia with one of this year’s traveling task forces in today’s Daily! Here’s a snippet:

For the first two weeks of winter quarter, my academic studies occurred in government buildings and NGO offices, my homework involved trekking through rice paddies and mountainous forests, and my teacher was the beautiful country of Indonesia.

As part of the Jackson School of International Studies’ task force program on climate change in Indonesia, I traveled with UW associate professor Celia Lowe and seven undergraduates to Indonesia with the goal of researching carbon emissions from deforestation and land-use changes.

Yet the scholarly endeavors were only a piece of the full learning experience I had in broadening my understanding of the history, politics, and culture of my father’s home country, Indonesia.

We traveled 8,386 miles to Indonesia, where we researched and created policy recommendations for the United Nations’ program on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD+) in developing countries. REDD+ is a global attempt to create financial incentives for forest conservation in Indonesia.

Equipped with nothing but a few weeks worth of knowledge about forestry rights in Indonesia and elementary Bahasa Indonesian skills, I felt underqualified to produce non-trivial recommendations to a United Nations representative about how REDD+ can be implemented in an efficient, effective, and equitable manner. We worked in collaboration with a University of Indonesia research team led by Dr. Suraya Afiff, a professor of political ecology in the university’s anthropology graduate program. Our Indonesian counterparts were invaluable as academic partners, translators, cultural brokers, and friends.


To read more, check out the rest of the article here!

The Jackson School Journal wants to publish YOU!

We are currently accepting submissions for our Spring 2012 issue. We accept Qualifying Papers, research papers and policy papers, and generally look for submissions about 10-15 double-spaced pages in length, though you’re welcome to submit something shorter or longer. Submissions go through a double-blind peer review process, and if your piece is selected you get the chance to work closely with an editor and faculty members. Plus, you get to see your name in print! Submissions are due October 14th, 2011.

For more information, check out the Submissions tab, or email us at jsjis@uw.edu.

The Journal is also looking for Peer Reviewers!

The Journal depends on a core group of peer reviewers every quarter to help select pieces for publication. Beginning Autumn 2011, reviewers are eligible to receive 1 credit of SIS 499 (Independent Study) for working with the Journal. Reviewing is also a great way to get involved with the Journal, especially for those interested in applying for the Editorial Board.

For more information, check out the Reviewing tab. To become a peer reviewer, email us at jsjis@uw.edu.

Drumroll please…


The Jackson School Journal’s third issue is now online! Our Autumn 2011 issue features timely examinations of NATO policy in Libya and Kenya’s new constitution, fascinating looks at modern French politics, the role of folk music clubs in Argentina and the complex interrelations of Cote d’Ivoire’s cocoa sector, and an interview with the Jackson School’s very own Professor Don Hellmann. To read on and download your own copy, check it out here: Vol. 2 No. 2 (Autumn 2011)

Much gratitude for the production of this issue goes to our authors — Talia Alongi, Gabrielle Gurian, David LaBoon, Christan Leonard, and Peter Muller — and our Spring 2011 peer reviewers — Henry Apfel, Natalie Block, Igor Cherny, Allie Ferguson, Charissa Ford, Scott Halliday, Sherrie Hsu, Naomi Joswiak, Mariah Noel Louie, Geoffrey Morgan, Kristen Reigle, Alyson Singh, Nikki Thompson, and Katherine Walton. Many thanks also to our faculty Advisory Board and, of course, Professor Don Hellmann, who shared with us some unforgettable stories. And a special shout-out to Russ Hugo for making such a gorgeous website!