Jackson School Journal
of International Studies

Archive for December, 2012

Volume 3 Number 2 – Autumn 2012


Expert Insights

Interview with Professor Cabeiri Robinson


The Expert Insights section proves time and again to be a highlight of our publication, and this issue is no exception. We had the pleasure of listening to the fresh perspectives of Jackson School Professor Cabeiri Robinson who has appointments in International Studies, South Asian Studies and Anthropology. Robinson shares her unconventional arrival as a South Asianist and of her research as a women working in conflict zones. The interview concludes with Robinson’s thoughts on the future of the Jackson School and advice for its students.

Volume 3 Number 2 – Autumn 2012


Brady Begin

Turning A Blind Eye

The Media’s Neglect of Cultural and Historical Intricacies of Violence


“Turning A Blind Eye” was written for an essay assignment in Professor Cabeiri Robinson’s JSIS 202 course. This essay was nominated to be considered for publication as an example of outstanding coursework.

Volume 3 Number 2 – Autumn 2012


Joelle Klein

A Suicide for Justice

The Death of Fakhra Younus


“A Suicide for Justice” was written for an essay assignment in Professor Cabeiri Robinson’s JSIS 202 course. This essay was nominated to be considered for publication as an example of outstanding coursework.

Volume 3 Number 2 – Autumn 2012


Kevin Shaw

Progress and Power

Competing Narratives in the Story of Daniel Zamudio


“Progress and Power” was written for an essay assignment in Professor Cabeiri Robinson’s JSIS 202 course. This essay was nominated to be considered for publication as an example of outstanding coursework.

Volume 3 Number 2 – Autumn 2012


Sherrie Hsu

Navigating the Dialectic of Materialism and Ideology

Emerging Youth Lifestyles in China


China’s rapid economic growth has generated much discussion about its high savings and low consumption rate. However, examining the market segmentation of various industries reveals a youth generation much more willing to consume. By drawing from sociological theories of consumption, this paper argues that Chinese youth are adapting their consumption habits to reflect new values of individuality and innovation and in turn generating a new Chinese culture of consumption. In order to understand the roots of this emerging consumer culture, it is necessary to understand the perceptions of Chinese youth of their own lifestyles. This paper discusses the changes in lifestyle that create new identities among Chinese consumers, the role of retailers in connecting consumer and supplier markets, and the effects of China’s incorporation into the global capitalist economy on consumption habits of Chinese youth, which in turn affects both China and the global market.

Volume 3 Number 2 – Autumn 2012


Ashley Bullock

Coming Out from Nowhere

Indian Same-Sex Desire in the 1980’s


This paper dissects the politics surrounding the emergence of lesbian activists
in India in the 1980s and looks at why homosexual female activists chose to initially reject the term ‘lesbian’. With a focus on groups of women in New Delhi, the paper is limited to looking particularly at how educated, urban activists consciously chose to represent the movement. The author tries to place the emergence of the activists into a political and cultural context by giving a brief background of the political tensions in India in the 1980s as well as the current cultural understanding of terms such as ‘lesbian’. The dissection of terms and labels is rooted in feminist theory which urges us to understand not only the prejudice against homosexuality in India but also the potential prejudice against activists who identify using ‘Western’ terms, such as lesbian. India’s colonial history and the varying forms of ‘acceptable’ masculinity, femininity and sexuality that emerged from this past explain the need for lesbian communities to name themselves in a new way. This discussion allows us to better understand the semantics of emerging identity groups and how feminists and lesbians can better address the varying scope of movements now subsumed under their banners.

Volume 3 Number 2 – Autumn 2012


Christine Woodward

Viva a Revolução

Politics, Culture and the Fora PM Movement


Ocupa Sampa, the São Paulo branch of the Occupy movement, has received
a warm reception from the Brazilian media. At the same time, Fora PM, a student
movement out to end the Universidade de São Paulo’s relationship with the Military Police, has not. Why then, since Fora PM’s grievances appear to be legitimate, has the Fora PM movement failed to control its image in the press while Ocupa Sampa has succeeded? In this paper, I use the work of social movement scholars Doug McAdam; Sonia Alvarez, Evelina Dagnino, and Arturo Escobar; and Marshall Ganz to uncover the mechanisms underlying the failures of the Fora PM. I argue that the members of Fora PM are constantly delegitimized by the cultural associations mapped onto university students in Brazilian society, resulting in a negative reception from Brazil’s media. Furthermore, Fora PM lacks the local network of resources necessary to challenge the cultural politics arrayed against the movement. Ultimately, I contend that Fora PM still exists only because its members engage in the psychological process of cognitive self-deception.