Current Grad Students                                                    
Yufeng Hou


Ph.D in Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington  ( – present)

My name is Yufeng Hou, a fourth year Ph.D. student in the group. I am interested in
metallic magnetic multilayers and microstructures. Research focused on designing,
fabrications, characterization and simulation of magnetic microstructures. Having
expertise in cleanroom microfabrication, thin film deposition, scanning probe microscope and micromagnetic simulations, I am passionate about technology innovations and their potentials to change our lives.

EMAIL

Zheng Li

Ph.D in Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington  (Sept 2010 – present)

 

Bachelors degree, Peking University (Sept 2006 - July 2010)

I am working on a novel perpendicular magnetic anisotropic (PMA) system— L10 FePd system epitaxially deposited onto MgO(001) substrate. My main goal is to achieve a new recipe for ordered L10 FePd thin film with different kind of additive under low deposition temperature and post-thermal process. Moreover, I am going to study the influence of nanopatterning on the magnetization reversal process of L10 FePd system to see the deep physics inside through a variety of advanced technique.


EMAIL

Hamed Arami

Ph.D in Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington ( – present)

I recieved my BSc and MSc in Materials Science and Engineering from Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran. I have extensive experience in synthesis, characterization and conjugation of different types of nanoparticles and polymers for in-vitro and in-vivo targeting, imaging and intracellular delivery of therapeutic agents. In Prof. Krishnan’s lab, I am using synthetic magnetic nanocarriers, as contrast agents for early diagnosis of cancers using magnetic particles imaging (MPI), which is an ultrasensitive alternative imaging technique for MRI.



EMAIL

hamed
Olivia Lenz

Ph.D in Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington (Sept 2011-present)

BS Chemistry, Seattle Pacific University, Seattle WA.

During my graduate work, I am working towards the design of novel synthesis of FeS2 nanomaterials for use in low-cost, non-toxic photovoltaics. Outside of graduate work, I enjoy sewing, cycling, rock climbing, and am trained in classical ballet.

My research seeks to develop a low-cost, non-toxic material for solar energy generation.

NASA Space Technology Research Fellow
Awarded NSF Graduate Fellowship


EMAIL

olivia
logodentonzheng ryan
Ryan Hufschmid


Ph.D in Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington  (Sept 2012– present)

Bachelor of Science in Physics, minor Mathematics, University of California, Santa Barbara 2011

Ryan was born and raised in Goleta, California. He studied Physics and Mathematics at the nearby University of California, Santa Barbara. As an undergrad he was involved in several research projects, and fell in love with experimental science. He has recently joined the Krishnan group and is beginning the Materials Science and Engineering PhD program in Fall 2012. Outside of his scientific interests, he is an avid musician, primarily a trombonist, and dancer of a variety of social and ballroom dances from swing to tango, and everything in between.

{More Research Information}

Delimitros Fellowship, UW 2012-2013
Academic Honors, UCSB Physics Department June 2011
UCSB Regents Scholar 2007-2011

EMAIL

ryan

Byung Seok Kwon


I was born in Seoul, South Korea. I moved to the Philippines when i was in 6th grade. After graduating from International School Manila, I moved onto Duke University in North Carolina, to major in Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science. I initiated my research career in 2009 in Professor Zauscher's lab, and continued until graduation in 2012.

My research interest lies in Surface and interface engineering of thin films of bio/chemical materials, including surface characterization and lithography. I am joining Professor Krishnan's lab in Fall of 2012 in University of Washington as a graduate student, and possibly further on as a ph.D candidate.

EMAIL

ryan

Ulrich Engelmann


Ulrich is a visiting grad student during the summer of 2013. He is working on a masters thesis on Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia at the Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule (RWTH) Aachen University, Germany. He plans to receive his M.Sc. in Solid State Physics at the end of 2013 and currently holds a Research Fellowship of the Stiftung Industrieforschung. He received his B.Sc. in Physics also at the RWTH Aachen University in 2010.

His research interests includes the theoretical modelling of the physical properties of nanoparticles, their experimental characterization, as well as their application in novel medical diagnostics (imaging) and therapy (hyperthermia)."

Outside the university, he is often found with a backpack on trails exploring nature or sometimes cities. Or on the mat training Ju-Jutsu, a modern selfdefence sports.

EMAIL

ryan

Mark Brunson


Ph.D in Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington  (Sept 2012– present)

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering,  San Francisco State University 2012

Mark earned a B.S. Mechanical Engineering with a focus in controls and robotics. During his undergraduate studies, he also performed materials science research in the areas of third generation photovoltaics, semiconducting thin films, and electronic transport in carbon nanotubes. Now in his second year at UW, his goal is to use his studies in controls and materials science to develop a SERS-based bioMEMS device for quick, portable diagnostics for medical and environmental applications. Outside the lab, he enjoys rock climbing, snowboarding, and brewing beer.


EMAIL

ryan

Eric Teeman


Ph.D in Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington (Sept 2013 - Present)

BS in Chemistry, minor in Materials Science, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology (Aug 2009 - May 2013)

I studied Chemistry and Materials Science at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in Terre Haute, IN. The aim of my undergraduate research was the development of carbon nanotube growth techniques using PECVD for application in microfluidics. I joined the Krishnan Research Group at University of Washington in the Fall of 2013. My research will focus on determining the nanotoxicology and mechanism of toxicity for functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles through the use of high resolution microscopy and spectroscopy techniques.

ARCS Foundation Fellow

EMAIL